Catriona

Catriona

3.6 7
by R. L. Stevenson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Catriona is a stirring tale of love, danger, and political intrigue set amidst the stately grandeur of old Edinburgh. David Balfour is an orphaned young gentleman who has recently managed to claim his inheritance from a miserly (and murderous) uncle. Now he and his friends James Stewart and Alan Breck are implicated in a sensational killing, and David must fight to…  See more details below

Overview

Catriona is a stirring tale of love, danger, and political intrigue set amidst the stately grandeur of old Edinburgh. David Balfour is an orphaned young gentleman who has recently managed to claim his inheritance from a miserly (and murderous) uncle. Now he and his friends James Stewart and Alan Breck are implicated in a sensational killing, and David must fight to clear their names. In the process he meets the beautiful and daring Catriona MacGregor Drummond, and finds that nothing will ever be the same again. Interwoven with real-life people and events, this sequel to the immensely popular Kidnapped was considered by Robert Louis Stevenson to be one of his best works.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781605124834
Publisher:
Akasha Publishing
Publication date:
04/12/2009
Pages:
316
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.71(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Catriona (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
InTheBookcase 20 days ago
This book was superb. I absolutely loved the enthralling plots taking place right along with the memorable characters. The storyline picks up exactly where the prequel, Kidnapped, leaves off. (So I recommend reading Catriona immediately after you finish the first book). David Balfour, orphaned, is a young man with his mind made up to do something. He's going to help a couple of friends clear the black mark off their names before they are wrongfully sent to the gallows. Being mixed in with such a horrible crime also puts David in a risky place even though he wants to help his friends. While in the midst of all the trials with lawyers, judges, and so many questions, David also makes a new friend, Catriona. She's a great person and wants to help David and do anything he asks – there's just one problem. Her father, James Monroe, is somehow mixed into the same crime that David is trying to get his friends out of. James Monroe might be a terrible enemy to David. Just like in Kidnapped, Alan Breck is in on the adventure too, with his strange, peculiar ways – always making him a thrilling character when he appears. I thought this book was just as entertaining as the first. For me, it was a lot of fun to read, but sometimes the reading is a little harder than other books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robert Louis Stevenson's novel 'Catriona' continues the run of bad luck that befell the young narrator, David Balfour, in 'Kidnapped.' I am glad the book has won new life in the Barnes and Noble Library of Essential Reading, but I do take issue with the feminist interpretation given in the introduction by Caroline McCracken-Flesher, professor of English at the University of Wyoming. While it is easy enough to understand how turn-of-the-century post-modernists view women characters primarily from a pro-feminist, anti-Victorian mindset, Catriona just will not fit into that construct. Catriona is far more like a manipulative Zelda Fitzgerald than a reasoned Eleanor Roosevelt. She snivels behind a closed door to make herself appear a misunderstood lady of good breeding, exhibits unwarranted jealousy toward Barbara Grant, and switches from love to hatred of David from chapter to chapter and even page to page. She deliberately jumps from a ship which is taking her to a place of safety into a small boat taking her to a place where she does not know the language and has no money. This shows her not to be a risk-taking woman, but a she-cat at the mercy of her busy emotions. She has all the earmarks of a Borderline Disorder Personality. A strong feminist character would be more sublime. It would be better to read 'Catriona' as the continuation of the journey of a naive narrator who is not a good judge of those whom he must trust whether it be family, clan, king, friend, or the entire judicial system of Scotland. 'Catriona' simply continues his education in the ways of the world by extending to beauty what Stevenson had already proven to be true of the clans and factions of the eighteenth-century Scottish male. Davie simply cannot trust his naive view of life, loyalty, and love. McCracken-Flesher comments specifically on a passage near the end of the book where Davie invites Catriona to accompany him to visit her just-as-treacherous father, to which she coyly agrees, 'If it be your pleasure.' To this, Davie, in an aside to the reader, remarks, 'These were early days.' McCracken-Flesher believes this passage proves that 'narrating from a distance of years, [David] has grown into a fuller understanding of gender relationships and married roles.' Possibly. But I think it just as likely to indicate that it will take the naive Davie many years to understand what the sympathetic reader was aware of by the end of Part I: alas, Catriona's words do not match her agenda. That Davie falls for her shows not that women can be just as strong as men, but that they can be just as treacherous.
Guest More than 1 year ago
True Stevenson fans will relish this continuation of the story began in Kidnapped. I loved the innocent interplay of the passion developing between David and Catronia. Alan Breck has a few interesting pages as well. Drenched in old Scot vernacular, you will not be disappointed.