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Caught in the Middle: America's Heartland in the Age of Globalism
     

Caught in the Middle: America's Heartland in the Age of Globalism

4.3 3
by Richard C. Longworth
 

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A sharp, brilliantly reported look at how globalization is changing America from the inside out.

The Midwest has always been the heart of America—both its economic bellwether and the repository of its national identity. Now, in a new, globalized age, the Midwest is challenged as never before. With an influx of immigrant workers and

Overview

A sharp, brilliantly reported look at how globalization is changing America from the inside out.

The Midwest has always been the heart of America—both its economic bellwether and the repository of its national identity. Now, in a new, globalized age, the Midwest is challenged as never before. With an influx of immigrant workers and an outpouring of manufacturing jobs, the region that defines the American self— the Lake Wobegon image of solid, hardworking farmers and factory hands—is changing at breakneck speed. As factory farms and global forces displace old ways of life, the United States is being transformed literally from the inside out.

In Caught in the Middle, longtime Chicago Tribune reporter Richard C. Longworth explores the new reality of life in today's heartland and reveals what these changes mean for the region—and the country. Ranging from the manufacturing collapse that has crippled the Midwest to the biofuels revolution that may save it, and from the school districts struggling with new immigrants to the Iowa meatpacking town that can't survive without them, Longworth addresses what's right and what's wrong in the region, and offers a prescription for how it must change—politically as well as economically—if it is to survive and prosper.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“One place in America that nobody can accuse of being unaware of China's economic ascent is the heartland--the industrial region that formed the center of the 20th century's most dynamic and innovative economy, but now is synonymous with unemployed workers and foreclosed houses. Former foreign correspondent Longworth's gloomy assessment of the prospects of a region that has been one of globalization's clear losers is harsh. But while his tale of the failures of complacent workers, inept managers and clueless politicians to confront global competition takes place firmly in the nation's interior, he offers little reason for those living elsewhere to feel insulated from similar threats.” —John Sparks, Newsweek

“A passionate, probing and painfully honest book.” —Jonathan Eig, Wall Street Journal

“A superb analysis of the crisis in the Midwest and sober advice on how to alleviate, if not eliminate, the region's pain. Moreover, he captures the flavor of the Midwest today, the nuevo Midwest -- replete with immigrants, urban/suburban/rural ghettos, hollowed-out cities, abandoned small towns, failing schools and feckless politicians. But it is still breathing and not without assets -- rich farmland, a plethora of fresh water, agricultural and industrial expertise and excellent research universities -- and a few success stories, a reborn Chicago, most notably....Caught in the Middle provides a brilliant battle plan.” —Peter A. Coclanis, Chicago Tribune

“But Longworth's book should be of interest even to those who have never come closer to America's heartland than to change planes at O'Hare. Almost any chapter of "Caught in the Middle" could generate a book's worth of debate anywhere in this country: What's to become of higher ed - or K-12 ed for that matter. The structure of state and local government as an impediment to remaking the economy. The role of immigration. The future of agriculture. The future of small towns not close enough to a metropolitan area to serve as bedroom communities.” —Bill Virgin, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

“The author has performed a public service by detailing the problem areas - farming, ethanol production, the loss of manufacturing, immigration and so on - that are challenging the citizens and their offspring in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. We who think we've got it so good out here, far from the craziness of the East and West coasts, need to be shaken from our indifferent state of mind. Longworth makes a valiant stab at that.” —Repps Hudson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Publishers Weekly

Ex-Chicago Tribunecorrespondent Longworth (Global Squeeze) paints a bleak, evocative portrait of the Midwest's losing struggle with foreign competition and capitalist gigantism. It's a landscape of shuttered factories, desperate laid-off workers, family farms gobbled up by agribusiness, once great cities like Detroit and Cleveland now in ruins, small towns devolved into depopulated "rural slums" haunted by pensioners and meth-heads. But the harshest element of the book is Longworth's own pitiless ideology of globalism. In his telling, Midwesterners are sluggish, unskilled, risk-averse mediocrities, clinging to obsolete industrial-age dreams of job security, allergic to "change," indifferent to education and "totally unfit for the global age." They are doomed because global competition is unstoppable, says Longworth, who dismisses the idea of trade barriers as simplistic nonsense purveyed by conspiracy theorists. The silver linings Longworth floats-biotechnology, proposals for regional cooperation-are meager and iffy. The Midwest's real hope, he insists, lies in a massive influx of mostly low-wage immigrant workers and in enclaves of "the rich and brainy," like Chicago and Ann Arbor, where the "creative class" sells nebulous "information solutions" to "dropouts and Ph.D.s." It's not the Middle West that's under siege in Longworth's telling; it's the now apparently quaint notion of a middle class. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
Nearly three years after Thomas L. Friedman famously declared the world "flat," a former Chicago Tribune foreign correspondent and native Iowan examines the Midwest's struggle with the new world economy. If the global age belongs to the spry and imaginative, then the American Heartland, sclerotic and dull, needs to beware. Once liberally dotted with neatly prosperous, iconic small towns-including Freeport, Minn., the model for much of Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon, and Eldon, Iowa, backdrop for Grant Wood's American Gothic-the region has suffered a four-decade decline from the shocks of the Japanese invasion of the 1980s, the deleterious effects of NAFTA and, now, the white-collar phase of globalization, where even service jobs evaporate. Urban centers like Detroit and Cleveland are all but dead, and St. Louis and Milwaukee are on life support. Relying on agricultural, industrial and census statistics, a variety of professional analyses and, most of all, on his lively reporting, Longworth (Global Squeeze: The Coming Crisis for First-World Nations, 1998) examines a region once dominant in manufacturing products and growing food, now grown tired and shabby, caught flat-footed in a flat world where money, jobs and ideas have no regard for borders. Having convincingly diagnosed the problem, even as much of the Midwest remains in denial, Longworth rejects "solutions" handed down from the national government (too clumsy) or up from city and state governments (too small). Instead, he argues that only the region itself, drawing on its acknowledged heritage and resources, can be both nimble and powerful enough to marshal the necessary financial and intellectual forces to compete successfully inthe global age. He calls for the creation of a Global Midwest Forum, the establishment of a high-speed train and a first-class digital-communication system, the founding of a regional journal with global coverage and the rethinking of the area's education system. He stresses the need for the Midwest to speak with one voice from its trade and investment offices and to open the door as widely as possible to immigration. A well-reported take on the Midwest's precarious economic, political and social condition, with a provocative prescription for its survival in the global world. Agent: Gary Morris/David Black Literary Agency

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596914131
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
12/26/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.73(w) x 9.23(h) x 1.35(d)

Meet the Author

Now a fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Richard C. Longworth was formerly an award-winning foreign correspondent and senior writer at the Chicago Tribune. His previous book, Global Squeeze, was lauded by Foreign Affairs as "an engrossing study of how advanced societies grapple with the disruptive forces of global markets." Twice a Pulitzer Prize finalist, Longworth lives in Chicago.

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Caught in the Middle: America's Heartland in the Age of Globalism 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
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