CBT for Schizophrenia: Evidence-Based Interventions and Future Directions

CBT for Schizophrenia: Evidence-Based Interventions and Future Directions

by Craig Steel
     
 

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This is the first publication to collate evidence-based protocols for the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in treating a variety of presentations associated with schizophrenia.

The past two decades has seen rapid growth in the number of clinical trials aimed at evaluating psychological interventions for this disorder, resulting in the recommendation

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Overview

This is the first publication to collate evidence-based protocols for the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in treating a variety of presentations associated with schizophrenia.

The past two decades has seen rapid growth in the number of clinical trials aimed at evaluating psychological interventions for this disorder, resulting in the recommendation of CBT as a treatment for schizophrenia in both the UK and US. However, until recently a generic form of CBT was proposed for use with the wide range of symptoms that result in a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Here, results from the latest clinical trials, show how therapists are now able to target specific presentations with specialized CBT protocols. For the first time, this powerful form of therapy can be tailored to the treatment of discrete symptoms such as command hallucinations, violent behaviour or co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder.

Each chapter reviews the current evidence base for a specific presentation before moving on to describe the relevant treatment protocol and deploying case material to bring the methodology to life. This book will prove an invaluable resource for any clinician wanting to engage in evidence-based practice with this group.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Steven T. Herron, MD (Assurance Health and Wellness)
Description: This book addresses the previously held notion that various forms of therapy had little benefit for those with schizophrenia by discussing the approach used in patients, as well as the symptoms targeted, while incorporating it with other well-known, beneficial treatments (such as social skills training).
Purpose: After decades of thought that suggested limited benefits of therapy for patients with psychosis, researchers in the mid-l990s began to find scientific evidence indicating short-term and long-term benefits for psychotic patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This work summarizes these findings and provides a framework for treatment of these patients.
Audience: Though potentially useful for anyone providing services or caring for patients with psychotic symptoms, the main beneficiaries of this book are likely to be those experienced with providing therapy (CBT or otherwise) to psychiatric patients, including students, social workers, therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists.
Features: Chapters are written by various authors and attempt to address the many symptomatic and behavioral aspects of psychotic presentations. Case examples illustrate specific challenges in working with this population, and charts and tables are arranged to highlight important points in the text. Each chapter ends with a list of current and relevant references.
Assessment: Although I am familiar with the literature about the advantages of CBT, as well as its practice in clinical scenarios, I have had limited experience with the use of CBT for patients with psychosis. Fortunately, this book enables readers to get up to speed reasonably quickly without overwhelming them with unnecessary detail. Chapters flow well despite having multiple authors, and address many of the most common and frequently encountered symptoms noted by those with psychosis, including sleep difficulties. While not a workbook that readers can use to guide CBT sessions with patients, it provides a nice overview of the evidence supporting the use of CBT and could be helpful for any clinicians working with these challenging patients.
From the Publisher
“All over, this book is very practical and to be recommended to therapists that want to get an insight into how problems associated with psychotic experiences can be efficiently treated psychologically.”  (Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy, 1 January 2014)

“While not a workbook that readers can use to guide CBT sessions with patients, it provides a nice overview of the evidence supporting the use of CBT and could be helpful for any clinicians working with these challenging patients.”  (Doody’s, 12 July 2013)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470712054
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/04/2013
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
761,937
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
This is an excellent and timely book. It reflects the recent developments in the Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) literature, which have focused on specific approaches for different presentations within the heterogeneous category of psychosis. Each chapter is based on a recent randomised controlled trial, carried out by the leaders in the field. As such the book provides state-of-the-art information about the latest trial findings, coupled with detailed and helpful protocols on how to deliver these interventions. It will prove indispensable to researchers and clinicians who are interested in finding out and applying the latest developments in CBTp.—Dr Emmanuelle Peters, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Director of PICuP (Psychological Interventions Clinic for outpatients with Psychosis), South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation

Meet the Author

Craig Steel is a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK. With a doctorate from the University of London, he has been an active clinician and researcher for 15 years, specializing in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and its use as a tool of intervention in schizophrenia and other severe mental health conditions.

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