CCDP: Cisco Internetwork Design Exam Notes by Patrick Ciccarelli, Todd Lammle, Robert Padjen |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
CCDP: Cisco Internetwork Design Exam Notes

CCDP: Cisco Internetwork Design Exam Notes

by Patrick Ciccarelli, Todd Lammle, Robert Padjen
     
 
CCDP Exam Notes: Cisco Internetwork Design provides the quick way to review your knowledge and make sure you grasp the material. Objective-by-objective treatment covers all the material you need to know for the exam, singling out critical information, outlining necessary procedures, identifying exam essentials, explaining key terms and concepts, and providing

Overview

CCDP Exam Notes: Cisco Internetwork Design provides the quick way to review your knowledge and make sure you grasp the material. Objective-by-objective treatment covers all the material you need to know for the exam, singling out critical information, outlining necessary procedures, identifying exam essentials, explaining key terms and concepts, and providing sample questions. It's the perfect companion book to the CCDP: Cisco Internetwork Design Study Guide.

Editorial Reviews

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Fast, handy, concise review for Cisco's CCDP internetwork design exam! In just 280 pages, a team of Cisco experts cover every exam objective, hitting all the highlights, walking you step-by-step through the most important procedures and explaining every concept and definition you'll need to know. The perfect complement to whatever CCDP training tools, courses, or "life experience" you're already involved with.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780782126402
Publisher:
Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/01/2000
Series:
Ccdp Exam Notes Series
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.91(w) x 8.22(h) x 0.64(d)

Read an Excerpt

Objective 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the steps for designing internetwork solutions.

One of the key skills CCDP: Cisco Internetwork Design (CID) assesses is your ability to solve an internetworking design problem by following a clear, logical set of steps. You may need to apply these steps as part of an overall solution or case study. Or, you may be asked to identify a problem as it pertains to a particular step in the design process.


Critical Information

Cisco recognizes and expects you to follow several steps in internetworking design. Each step is part of a methodology for building and maintaining a network that will support a business as far into the future as is feasible.

Figure 1.1 shows the flow of the six basic steps of Cisco's design methodology. Although the design methodology does not include all the steps or tasks involved in a real-world implementation, Cisco will expect you to apply this model to scenarios presented to you in the CID exam.

Step 1: Analyze the Network Requirements

The process of analyzing requirements should include a review of the technical components (both technological and administrative), along with an assessment of the business needs.

Step 2: Develop an Internetwork Structure

During this second step in the design process, you apply the Cisco threetier hierarchical model to building your internetwork. The three-tier model, shown in Figure 1.2, includes the core, distribution, and access layers. The core layer is the backbone of your network, while the distribution layer provides the intermediate access points for different sites. The access layer is the point where end devices gain access to the network at each site.

Step 3: Configure the Standards

The third step of the design process involves standardizing the addressing scheme and naming conventions. Standardizing the addressing scheme requires that you logically organize groups of addresses, like IP subnets, and assign them to the appropriate networks. If the internetwork supports variable-length subnet masks, it is possible to create a hierarchical addressing scheme that will simplify address management as the network grows. The naming convention you select should be hierarchical and intuitive, and it should make managing and growing the network easier. Incorporate a naming syntax that identifies the organization, group, and user that the device belongs to, for exampleserver 1.marketing.sybex.com.

Step 4: Select and Configure Components

This step includes identifying and selecting the appropriate hardware from different vendors. Hardware includes cabling infrastructure, routers, switches, remote access services, ISPs, and telecommunication providers.

Step 5: Add New Features

In the fifth step, any additional services like a new protocol, management support, or security are added to the network.

Step 6: Implement, Monitor, and Maintain the Network

The final step is to review the initial design requirements, assess the health of both the existing network and the new one once it is in place, and provide for management of the network. Cisco recommends that designs be prototyped for the client and that the network be implemented in phases to reduce the impact to users.


Exam Essentials

As you will learn in later objectives, the CID exam emphasizes the application of design methodology to a real-life example. That means you will be given a specific scenario where you will have to identify the critical criteria and determine the appropriate design step.

Understand the six-step network design methodology. The six steps to follow in order are: analyze the requirements for the network; develop the internetwork structure; configure the standards, including addresses, names, and equipment types; configure the components; add new features; and implement, monitor, and maintain the network. Each step is considered critical and should not be overlooked.

Be able to describe the details of each step of network design methodology. You need to be able to describe each step in the proper sequence and apply each step to the context of network design.


Key Terms and Concepts

Hierarchical model: A series of tiers, each with distinct features, that are dependent on one another.

Methodology: A set of steps used to systematically design, construct, or solve a problem.

Standards: A set of rules or criteria that outline the operation of a task or process....

Meet the Author

Patrick Ciccarelli, CCDP, CCNP, and MCSE, is the founder and CEO of Nethos, Inc., a San Francisco-based network management services consulting company.

Robert Padjen's eight years of industry experience includes network design, data security, and business/technology modeling, as well as the development and presentation of network training programs.

Todd Lammle has over fifteen years experience with LANs and WANs. He is president of GlobalNet Systems, a network integration firm based in Colorado.

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