Celandine (Touchstone Trilogy Series #2)

Celandine (Touchstone Trilogy Series #2)

4.7 17
by Steve Augarde
     
 

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Now available in paperback with gorgeous new cover art!

Set seventy years before The Various, the second book in the trilogy follows the adventures of young Celandine at the onset of the First World War. Having run away from her detested boarding school, Celandine is too afraid to go home in case she is sent back. As she seeks shelter in the Wild

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Overview

Now available in paperback with gorgeous new cover art!

Set seventy years before The Various, the second book in the trilogy follows the adventures of young Celandine at the onset of the First World War. Having run away from her detested boarding school, Celandine is too afraid to go home in case she is sent back. As she seeks shelter in the Wild Wood near her home, little does she think she will encounter a world where loyalty and independence is fiercely guarded, and where danger lurks in the most unlikely of places. Celandine's troubled character finds both refuge and purpose among the secret tribes of little people that she alone believes in.

The novels of the Various trilogy are full of mystery, beauty and adventure; this second novel is both page-turning and life-affirming.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for the Various:
"A marvelous blend of old-fashioned storytelling, the book has a freshness and immediacy that will intrigue fantasy lovers of all ages."—VOYA
"A rousing addition to the durable genre of British fairy lit."—The New York Times Book Review
"Augarde unfolds the events gradually, allowing readers to luxuriate in the near-idyllic setting he has created and beckoning them back for future installments."—Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly
PW called The Various a "rich and atmospheric fairy tale" set on Mill Farm, home to a panoply of magical beings. Celandine by Steve Augarde, its prequel set in WWI England, introduces the title heroine, who discovers fairies living on a hill near her family's farm. At the same time, she uncovers her own gifts of healing. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Judy Crowder
This beautifully written book is magical in so many ways! Celendine, thirteen, is creative, compassionate, and resilient despite the odds: misguided parents, a hateful and strict governess, plus a World War II—era British boarding school that one hopes can only be found in fiction, complete with horrid, bullying girls. Then there are the Various, the little people—the Ickri and Naiad, Wisp, Tinklers and Troggles, who live on Howard's Hill. The hill is part of Celandine's family farm, but is too steep and stony to plow, so it is left to grow wild. Celendine's chance meeting with Fin, an innocent, childlike Ickri, introduces her to a magical world, so unlike her everyday life. It is the knowledge of this secret world that sustains Celendine through the ugly life of Mount Pleasant School: the tedious routine, the constant threat of corporal punishment, and losing her one friend. When Celendine learns that Freddie, her beloved brother who enlisted at age sixteen, is killed in the war, Celendine leaves the Gorgi (human) world for that of the Faerie, where she is grudgingly, then lovingly accepted. But when another Ickri clan, dark, warlike, and winged, arrive with the Touchstone, a magical sphere stolen long ago from the little people on Howard's Hill, even the peaceful world of the Various is shattered. Celendine, forced to flee, wonders if she has exchanged one world at war for another. Celendine is the second of a trilogy about the little people. The first book, The Various, winner of the British Smarties Medal, has a different human character. This second in the trilogy stands alone well. Beautifully illustrated with Augarde's black-and-white drawings, this bookis a treasure, right up there with Narnia and Middle Earth!
VOYA - Mary Arnold
The second entry in a planned trilogy, following Various (David Fickling Books/Random House, 2004/VOYA October 2004) moves the action back seventy years to the eve of World War I, as thirteen-year-old Celandine struggles to make the best of her lonely days on the family farm. Under the thumb of a cruel governess, she runs to the woods where the wee folk show this young "Gorgi" (giant) their secret places, and Celandine finds true friends. When her beloved brother is killed in France, Celandine is shipped off to a strict boarding school. She escapes from the brutal bullying there and hides out back in the Somerset woods, where the wee folk help her develop her own special magic. In a parallel story to Celandine's tribulations, readers learn more of the tumultuous history of the Various, as the Northern, warlike Ickri descend on Celandine's peaceful friends, seeking the power that reuniting two magical relics, the Touchstone and Orbis, will bring. An inventive fairy adventure story, this sequel also paints a compelling picture of school life and the discrimination that Celandine's family faces for their German heritage. It is a treat for all ages.
School Library Journal
Gr 7-10-A prequel to The Various (Random, 2004). Celandine is the odd student at her new boarding school, the one who doesn't fit in. World War I has just begun and her brother has enlisted, leaving her feeling even more alone. She hatches a plan to escape the institution's cruelty and ridiculous rules and regulations, returning to familiar ground and the friends she left behind-the Various, who inhabit Howard's Hill near her home. But all is not well with the little people, and a tribal war breaks out. The intrigue begins early in the story, but some readers might find that the flashback takes up too much of the novel; it travels back three years in time and doesn't return to 1915 until 200 pages later. However, those who stick with it will be rewarded, as, in the end, they find out why Celandine acted as she did and learn more about the Various.-Dylan Thomarie, Johnstown High School, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Set in 1915, 70 years before The Various (2004), this second of a trilogy continues the story of an ancient tribe of little people hidden from the human world. When 13-year-old Celandine encounters Fin, one of the little people living on a wooded hill on her father's farm in Somerset, she is initially incredulous, but also enchanted. Lonely and unhappy, Celandine moves easily between the real and the imaginary, accepting the little people as the friends she lacks. Sent away to boarding school, Celandine is bullied and then heartbroken when her brother dies in the war. Overwhelmed, she flees, hiding in the woods with the little people, who provide needed refuge and comfort. When the Ickri, a hostile tribe of little people, storm the woods, Celandine's presence is a danger to all. She must return to her own world and learn to survive. Intertwining elements from the English fairy-fantasy and boarding-school genres, Augarde creates a familiar yet entirely original world, a very sympathetic heroine and an absolutely riveting adventure that isn't over yet. Stay tuned. (Fiction. 10-14)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440422167
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
04/14/2009
Series:
Touchstone Trilogy Series, #2
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
496
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile:
890L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Steve Augarde has worked as an illustrator, a paper engineer, and a semipro jazz musician. He has written and illustrated more than seventy picture books for younger children, and has produced the paper engineering for many pop-up books—including those by other artists—as well as providing the artwork and music for two animated BBC television series. He lives in Yorkshire, England.

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Celandine (Touchstone Trilogy Series #2) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Firebird, please go to last result. Meadowleaf
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She wasnt sure who she wanted as a mate. - Creeksplash
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Purred relieved she wasnt angrey. -Onetail
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
In book two of THE TOUCHSTONE TRILOGY, we are introduced to Celandine and her life in 1915. Her governess is horrible and enjoys making her life miserable. When she's sent off to boarding school, she hopes things will be better. Instead, she discovers things can and do get worse. She's bullied and accused of being a witch, and to make matters worse, her country is at war with Germany. When Celandine has the chance, she runs away from school and goes to the only place she thinks she'll be safe - the secret world of the little people. Unfortunately, her existence among the Various doesn't stay safe. A new tribe, the Ickri, descend upon the forest. They bear the Touchstone and are seeking the Orbis. Unbeknownst to the tribe, their king has gained his power through deceit and murder. Now he's willing to do anything to obtain the Orbis, even if it means killing Celandine and the other tribes. Like THE VARIOUS, CELANDINE is a thrilling book told from several different points of view as we are taken back in time before Midge's adventure to learn how the Various and Celandine became acquainted and come to a better understanding of the events mentioned in THE VARIOUS. I enjoyed being introduced to CELANDINE, though I missed Midge and the characters in THE VARIOUS. I am looking forward to seeing how Midge and Celandine's stories wind up in WINTER WOOD, Augarde's final book in the trilogy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once again, Augarde has woven a fascinating blend of adventure, tragedy, terror, beauty, and magic, this time adding a thread of historical color. It is interesting, and at times agonizing, to experience the fear, anger, hatred, and anxiety of a country at war, a page in history that has been overshadowed by more recent events. But whether the setting is a rigidly regulated girls' dormitory or a wild forest full of otherworldly creatures, this book delivers more than just social criticism. It is full of magical marvels, unsettling weirdness, and nerve-wracking suspense. It is peppered with luscious vistas, gruesome shocks, snicker-inducing pranks, and mysteries that linger even at the end of the tale, so that you're glad there's a third book coming. Plus, Celandine is full of rich, lively characters, memorable dialogue, and even a bit of romance tinted with a touch of sepia-tone melancholy. If you were to read this as the first book in the series, you would find it full of intriguing foreshadowings of 'things to come' in the latter-day adventures of The Various. And it is also charged with enough storytelling energy to send the trilogy's third book into orbit! (Robbie Fischer - Mugglenet)
Guest More than 1 year ago
(From Robbie Fischer, reviewer for Mugglenet.) The second book in the trilogy that began with The Various is an unusual sort of sequel. Instead of picking up where the first book left off, Celandine goes back several decades, to the early 20th century, when Europe was on the brink of the First World War. But in a really weird way, it does connect with the events of The Various, particularly as the farm girl Celandine Howard has unsettling visions of another girl who will live on the same farm...the better part of a century later. These aren¿t Celandine¿s only weird experiences, though. She senses a dog is dying merely by touching it. She has unsettling premonitions, and shows signs of having the healing touch. All of these things make her a social outcast, a target of bullies, and an object of suspicion to the teachers and staff at the boarding school Celandine is forced to attend after a set-to with her governess that, believe me, you would rather read for yourself than have summarized to you. Things are nearly as bad at home, where her father and oldest brother are unsympathetic, her Austrian-born mother is ostracized by a society at war with her homeland, and her closest brother is rushing headlong into danger on the battlefield. With all these things against her, it is no wonder that Celandine keeps her strangest gift a secret. For she also knows about the ¿little people¿ who live on the wooded hill on her family¿s farm. To the Various, Celandine is a fearsome giant, the only one of her race they have ever befriended. When the terrible events in Celandine¿s life trigger a major crisis, her secret becomes her refuge. But just when it seems she could go on living with her earthy little friends, another crisis comes from outside, one that will force Celandine to choose between facing her problems in the outside world and being completely destroyed. For a long-lost tribe of winged warriors is about to arrive and stir things up on Howard¿s Hill, led by a crafty devil who is willing to shed any amount of blood necessary to get the power that he wants. Once again, Augarde has woven a fascinating blend of adventure, tragedy, terror, beauty, and magic, this time adding a thread of historical color. It is interesting, and at times agonizing, to experience the fear, anger, hatred, and anxiety of a country at war, a page in history that has been overshadowed by more recent events. The misery of Celandine¿s school days is a study in changing attitudes toward childhood discipline and psychic powers, and of the unchanging nature of human beings¿be they little girls or little people¿when they are placed together in a tension-filled social structure. But whether the setting is a rigidly regulated girls¿ dormitory or a wild forest full of otherworldly creatures, this book delivers more than just social criticism. It is full of magical marvels, unsettling weirdness, and nerve-wracking suspense. It is peppered with luscious vistas, gruesome shocks, snicker-inducing pranks, and mysteries that linger even at the end of the tale, so that you¿re glad there¿s a third book coming. Plus, Celandine is full of rich, lively characters, memorable dialogue, and even a bit of romance tinted with a touch of sepia-tone melancholy. If you were to read this as the first book in the series, you would find it full of intriguing foreshadowings of ¿things to come¿ in the latter-day adventures of The Various. And it is also charged with enough storytelling energy to send the trilogy¿s third book into orbit! Robbie Fischer
Guest More than 1 year ago
Celandine is one of the most magical stories after Harry Potter. You may not get it at first but you'll catch on fast. You really don't know what your missing. it takes plce in 1915, in England. 'The year is 1915, Britian is at war, and life for Celandine has become unbearable.' Best book. Well next to Harry Potter:-)
Guest More than 1 year ago
How do I say this without sounding cliche? Um.I can't. 'Celandine' is, simply put, the most magical book I have ever read, and I am usually pretty hesitant about saying books are the 'most' or 'best' of anything. Celandine is an amazing character - I was so touched that I cried a little when I finished it. Of course, I was smiling like crazy too. I also loved how this book reads like a classic. The writing is so different from other children's books that come out today. I would almost say it is better than Harry Potter. My only question: How has the rest of the world not discovered Augard yet?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Celandine is superb fantasy for children!! It is so much better than most of the fantasy out there today because it weaves in historical fantasy as well as modern.for anyone looking for fantasy that is a cut above most out there!
Guest More than 1 year ago
BUY THIS BOOK! 'Celandine' continues where 'The Various' left off (albeit 70 years earlier) and what a sequel it is. While I admired Midge's tenacity in the first book, Celandine's made me laugh out loud. In fact, it's been a year since I read the book and I still smile when I think about her exploits as she struggles to survive boarding school, and all of the other disasters that befall her. Of course, the Various are as endearing, frightening, and touching as ever. In 'Celandine' we meet a host of new characters which, thanks to the brilliance of Mr. Augarde, will have you cheering and booing, laughing and crying. And above all, they'll have you WISHING for the third book! I know I am.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fantastic, Pegs is my favourite character It was funny and gripping brilliant for first time readers, I should know because I read 3 books a day!!!