Cell

Cell

4.0 62
by Robin Cook
     
 

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George Wilson, M.D., a radiology resident in Los Angeles, is about to enter a profession on the brink of an enormous paradigm shift, foreshadowing a vastly different role for doctors everywhere. The smartphone is poised to take on a new role in medicine, no longer as a mere medical app but rather as a fully customizable personal physician capable of diagnosing and… See more details below

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Overview

George Wilson, M.D., a radiology resident in Los Angeles, is about to enter a profession on the brink of an enormous paradigm shift, foreshadowing a vastly different role for doctors everywhere. The smartphone is poised to take on a new role in medicine, no longer as a mere medical app but rather as a fully customizable personal physician capable of diagnosing and treating even better than the real thing. It is called iDoc.

George’s initial collision with this incredible innovation is devastating. He awakens one morning to find his fiancée dead in bed alongside him, not long after she participated in an iDoc beta test. Then several of his patients die after undergoing imaging procedures. All of them had been part of the same beta test.

Is it possible that iDoc is being subverted by hackers—and that the U.S. government is involved in a cover-up? Despite threats to both his career and his freedom, George relentlessly seeks the truth, knowing that if he’s right, the consequences could be lethal.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/02/2013
By combining plausible developments in artificial intelligence with current concerns about the number of available general practitioners, Cook (Nano) has produced one of his better recent thrillers. L.A. radiology resident George Wilson is racked with guilt after his fiancée, Kasey Lynch, dies of hypoglycemia as he was sleeping next to her. As he prepares to begin his final year of residency, a former med school colleague and occasional lover, Paula Stonebrenner, invites George to attend a rollout of iDoc, a smartphone app that functions as an individualized primary-care physician, which uses sensors to continually monitor vital signs and provide instantaneous diagnosis and treatment. The concept seems too good to be true, and that apprehension proves warranted when several test subjects of the app die unexpectedly, leading George to become obsessed with ascertaining the cause. The truth behind the deaths is both logical and surprising, and enables Cook to engage with serious medical ethics issues. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
“Rare is the writer who can take us into the fast-paced, miraculous, often bewildering world of modern medicine the way Robin Cook can. Cell is a superbly crafted, full-steam thriller, to be sure, but also a vivid lesson in just how momentous are the advances being made in medicine almost by the day—and how highly unsettling are some of the possible consequences.”—David McCullough, New York Times bestselling author of The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

“With Cell Robin Cook demonstrates why he is the undisputed king of medical thrillers. Can a smartphone app kill you? You'll believe it can after you read this story, which blasts along faster than a truckload of quad core processors. Equal measures a substantive social commentary that we will all soon have to deal with and a terrifying blood-and-guts tale of what lies right around the technology corner, Cook has delivered a home run worthy of the writer who has consistently thrilled millions ever since his blockbuster Coma.”—David Baldacci, #1 New York Times bestselling author of King and Maxwell

“Robin Cook has been entertaining medical thriller fans for decades, but he does much more with his latest novel, Cell.... Cook has written a thought-provoking story.”—The Associated Press

“Cook, ever the master of the medical thriller, combines controversial biomedical research issues with critical ethical concerns and gripping suspense. This outstanding and thought-provoking thriller will attract a wide readership.” —Library Journal

“Logical and surprising...Cook engages with serious medical ethical issues.”—Publishers Weekly

“Robin Cook proves again he is the master of medical thrillers.” —Suspense Magazine 

Kirkus Reviews
2013-11-24
Cook's latest thriller (Nano, 2012, etc.). The "cell" of the title refers to cellphones, which are being used to deliver the services of a virtual physician. That's the business enterprise of George Wilson, the radiology resident that the author brings back and installs in a major medical center in Los Angeles. George, engaged to Kasey, awakens one morning to find she has died during the night. Since Kasey was diabetic, her death is linked to her disease, and although George mourns her, he doesn't question how it happened. At least, until he attends a meeting at the invitation of an old flame who wants to show off a new app called iDoc, which integrates real physicians and medical treatment with technology in a way that helps keep patients out of the emergency rooms and doctors' offices by offering them immediate, custom-tailored medical consultations over their cellphones. But when people that George knows start dropping dead and all of them are beta testers for iDoc, the fourth-year resident decides to probe deeper into the project. What he finds is the potential for enormous profits and, much scarier, the government's heavy hand stirring the pot. Soon, George is involved in an attempt to expose a plan to kill off high-risk cases and finds himself unable to trust anyone, setting off a series of catastrophic events that could lead to George's destruction. Cook, a physician, knows the world of medicine, but this book reads like it's phoned in: heavy with clichés, lacking plausible plot progression and packed with characters who speak in exclamation points. A disappointing attempt to link medicine and technology.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101635438
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/04/2014
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
6,638
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for CELL:
 
“Rare is the writer who can take us into the fast-paced, miraculous, often bewildering world of modern medicine the way Robin Cook can. CELL is a superbly crafted, full-steam thriller, to be sure, but also a vivid lesson in just how momentous are the advances being made in medicine almost by the day—and how highly unsettling are some of the possible consequences.”
—David McCullough New York Times-bestselling author of The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris
 
"With Cell Robin Cook demonstrates why he is the undisputed king of medical thrillers.  Can a smartphone app kill you? You'll believe it can after you read this story, which blasts along faster than a truckload of quad core processors. Equal measures a substantive social commentary that we will all soon have to deal with and a terrifying blood-and-guts tale of what lies right around the technology corner, Cook has delivered a home run worthy of the the writer who has consistently thrilled millions ever since his blockbuster Coma."
 —David Baldacci #1 New York Times-bestselling author of King and Maxwell

“Robin Cook has been entertaining medical thriller fans for decades, but he does much more with his latest novel, Cell.... Cook has written a thought-provoking story.”
—Associated Press

“Cook, ever the master of the medical thriller, combines controversial biomedical research issues with critical ethical concerns and gripping suspense. This outstanding and thought-provoking thriller will attract a wide readership.” —Library Journal 
 
“Logical and surprising...Cook engages with serious medical ethical issues.”
Publishers Weekly 

“Robin Cook proves again he is the master of medical thrillers.” —Suspense Magazine 

Read More

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