Cell Tropism Of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Depends On The Cells In Which It Is Grown.

Overview

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections and hospital visits for infants and the elderly. RSV initiates efficient infection in cultured immortalized cells by attaching to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) using the virus-encoded G glycoprotein. We have found that RSV produced by the human cell line, HEp-2, is dependent on cell surface GAGs for infectivity, while RSV from the African green monkey cell line, Vero, is not. Virions from HEp-2 cells contain the classical 90 kDa G ...
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Overview

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections and hospital visits for infants and the elderly. RSV initiates efficient infection in cultured immortalized cells by attaching to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) using the virus-encoded G glycoprotein. We have found that RSV produced by the human cell line, HEp-2, is dependent on cell surface GAGs for infectivity, while RSV from the African green monkey cell line, Vero, is not. Virions from HEp-2 cells contain the classical 90 kDa G protein, while virions from Vero cells contain much less of the 90 kDa form, substituting a 55 kDa form instead. This 55 kDa is not a processing intermediate because it contains mature N-linked carbohydrate chains. Furthermore, the 55 kDa G protein no longer reacts with monoclonal antibodies against the C-terminus of the G protein. It appears that the 55 kDa G protein is derived from the 90 kDa G protein through cleavage, and loss of its C-terminus. We confirmed this possibility by constructing a virus whose G protein contains a C-terminal 6His tag, the 55 kDa form in Vero grown virions had no 6His tag. To determine how loss of the C-terminus would affect the binding and therefore infection in an in vivo-like model, we compared the ability of HEp-2 and Vero grown RSV to infect well differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures. Vero grown RSV infected HAE cultures more than 650-fold less efficiently than HEp-2 grown virus, indicating that the 90 kDa G protein in HEp-2 grown virus is needed for efficient infection. It suggests that the C-terminus of the G protein is specifically involved in infection. Virus produced by these HAE cultures remained GAG---dependent, like the virus from HEp-2 cells, but unlike the virus produced by Vero cells. Interestingly, the predominant form of G protein in HAE grown virions is ---180 kDa. This "super-sized" G protein may be due to increased glycosylation or oligomerization preserved by a covalent, non-disulfide bond. We have found the predominant forms of the RSV attachment glycoprotein incorporated into virions differ dramatically depending on the cell that produces them, as does their function.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781244101623
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/12/2011
  • Pages: 198
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.42 (d)

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