Cendrillon by Sheila Hebert-Collins, Patrick Soper |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Cendrillon

Cendrillon

by Sheila Hebert-Collins, Patrick Soper
     
 

As in Cinderella, Cendrillon is pestered by la belle-mère (her stepmother) and les belles-soeurs (her stepsisters) but is helped by the bayou creatures who are ses bon amis (her good friends) and by la marraine (her fairy godmother). However, in New Orleans, the big event is Rex's Mardi Gras ball. Rex, also known as Ovey Thibeaux, hopes to meet his wife at the

Overview

As in Cinderella, Cendrillon is pestered by la belle-mère (her stepmother) and les belles-soeurs (her stepsisters) but is helped by the bayou creatures who are ses bon amis (her good friends) and by la marraine (her fairy godmother). However, in New Orleans, the big event is Rex's Mardi Gras ball. Rex, also known as Ovey Thibeaux, hopes to meet his wife at the ball. As fate would have it, Cendrillon and Ovey fall en amour (in love).

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathleen Kelly
No "bibbity-bobbity-boos" for the fairy marraine of this Cinderella tale: she turns crawfish into horses and a crab into a coachman, all the while invoking Cajun sausage and chanting "poosh, poosh, poosh." This is not one of the many folk versions that have evolved in the South; rather it is Collins' open attempt to marry Cajun culture and language to the popular vision of Cinderella. French phrases sprinkle the text, and although they are defined on the bottom of each page, the effect is still confusing and contrived. Soper's vivid blue and green toned illustrations convey an appealing mixture of fairy tale and down-home New Orleans flavor (for example, the ferryboat that carries Cendrillon's coach across the river), even if Cendrillon herself is barely recognizable from one page to the next. With so many other Cinderella adaptations available, this one is hardly essential, but fans of Cajun culture and language may find it appealing.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-This "Cinderella" variant is not to be confused with Robert San Souci's Caribbean retelling with the same title (S & S, 1998). In Collins's version, Cendrillon lives in New Orleans; the ball is held during Mardi Gras; and the prince is Ovey, a rich man's son who has been named King of Mardi Gras (Rex) and who is looking for a bride. The girl's carriage is a cushaw (squash), her horses are crevisses (crawfish), and her shoes are made of mother-of-pearl. Cajun phrases are inserted throughout the narrative with translations and pronunciation guides at the bottom of each page. Collins follows the Disney version of "Cinderella" and includes the superfluous episode in which the animal friends make the young woman's first ball gown, which her stepsisters then destroy. The text is unimaginative and at times strains to include local customs and words; the Cajun phrases are so frequent that they become intrusive and interrupt the flow of the tale. Soper's illustrations are done in beautiful colors, but can't redeem this bland text.-Judith Constantinides, East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565543263
Publisher:
Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/1998
Series:
Cajun Tall Tales Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,107,754
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

A former teacher who makes frequent school appearances, Sheila Hébert-Collins proudly claims a heritage that is completely Cajun. A native of Abbeville, Louisiana, Hébert-Collins combined her love and pride of her culture with her love of children's literature to create unique, Cajun fairy tales. Because of her talent, she is featured on the Louisiana State Artist Roster as an author and Cajun storyteller. She has also written Cendrillon: A Cajun Cinderella, Blanchette et Les Sept Petits Cajuns: A Cajun Snow White, Jacques et La Canne à Sucre: A Cajun Jack and the Beanstalk, Jolie Blonde and the Three Héberts: A Cajun Twist to an Old Tale, Les Trois Cochons, and 'T Pousette et 'T Poulette: A Cajun Hansel and Gretel, all published by Pelican.

The lush surroundings of his south Louisiana home and studio often influence the work of award-winning illustrator Patrick Soper. The work of Patrick Soper, a member of the Society of Illustrators, has appeared in national publications such as Outdoor Life, Organic Gardening, and West Coast Book Review. In addition to Cendrillon: A Cajun Cinderella, he has illustrated Cajun Folktales, Contes Populaires Cadiens, Mardi Gras in the Country, and A Christmas Dictionary, all published by Pelican.

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