Centerfield [25th Anniversary Edition]

Centerfield [25th Anniversary Edition]

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by John Fogerty
     
 

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John Fogerty pulled himself out of the game sometime after his 1976 album Hoodoo failed to materialize and he sat on the bench for a full decade, returning in the thick of the Reagan era with Centerfield in 1985. For as knowingly nostalgic as Centerfield is, deliberately mining from Fogerty's childhood memories and…  See more details below

Overview

John Fogerty pulled himself out of the game sometime after his 1976 album Hoodoo failed to materialize and he sat on the bench for a full decade, returning in the thick of the Reagan era with Centerfield in 1985. For as knowingly nostalgic as Centerfield is, deliberately mining from Fogerty's childhood memories and consciously referencing his older tunes, the album is steeped in the mid-'80s, propelled too often by electronic drums -- the title track has a particularly egregious use of synthesized handclaps -- occasionally colored by synths and always relying on the wide-open production that characterized the '80s…plus, there's no denying that this is the work of a middle-aged baby boomer, romanticizing TV, rockabilly, baseball, and rock & roll girls. Since Fogerty always romanticized a past he never lived, these sepia tones suit him, but it also helps that he's written a clutch of terrific songs: that giddy ode to his beloved game, the equally sunny rocker "Rock and Roll Girls," the snappy Sun tribute "Big Train from Memphis," the gently swaying "I Saw It on T.V.," the rip-roaring "I Can't Help Myself" (only slightly undone by its hyperactive drum programming) and, of course, "The Old Man Down the Road," a callback to CCR's spooky swamp rock so successful that Saul Zaentz, the then-president of Fogerty's former label Fantasy, sued John for plagiarizing himself. Of course, Zaentz's ire was likely piqued by Fogerty baiting the record label president on no less than two songs on this slim nine-track LP: Fogerty howls against "Mr. Greed" and taunts that "Zanz Kant Danz but he'll steal your money," a potshot so direct he had to retitle it "Vanz Kant Danz" on subsequent pressings. Perhaps Fogerty's anger is justified -- he had to give up his rights to CCR songs as a condition of leaving Fantasy -- but it's not articulated well in song, adding a slight unwelcome sourness to an album that's otherwise a cheerful, glorious comeback. [The 25th Anniversary Edition of Centerfield adds two bonus tracks, "My Toot Toot" and "I Confess," two covers that were issued as B-sides for singles from Fogerty's subsequent album, 1986's Eye of the Zombie.]

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Product Details

Release Date:
06/29/2010
Label:
Geffen Records
UPC:
0602527417622
catalogNumber:
001444102
Rank:
30010

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

John Fogerty   Primary Artist,Guitar,Piano,Vocals
Rockin' Sidney   Accordion
Bobby King   Vocals
Warren Storm   Drums
Terry Evans   Vocals
Neil Stubenhaus   Bass
Mark Miller   Bass Guitar
Kip Bacque   Guitar
Willie Green   Vocals
Steve Douglas   Saxophone
Willy T.   Saxophone
Robinson   Drums

Technical Credits

John Fogerty   Arranger,Composer,Producer,Executive Producer,Instrumentation
Jim Bessman   Liner Notes
Sydney Simien   Composer
N. Nathan   Composer
Julia Fogerty   Executive Producer

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Centerfield 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I believe this is Fogerty's first album after the break up of CCR. I'm 22 now, but have listened to this album since I was 5. I would have to say this is the best record he put out after CCR. Every song has a way to linger with you just after one time listening. Search Light and I Saw on T.V. probably my faves.
Guest More than 1 year ago
J C's third solo outing was the one that put him back on the map with the instant classic ''Centerfield'', but contrary to popular belief he was not dormant between CCR and Centerfield. He released an excellent country roots album under the pseudonym ''Blue Ridge Rangers'' in 1973 and the ultimate Creedance sound-alike album ''John Fogerty'' in 1975. Centerfield did however have the commercial and critical success that it rightfully deserved. I love the fact that Fogerty is not afraid to plagerize Creedance. JC Fogerty and Creedance Clearwater Revival are synonomous.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago