Ceramica y Cultura: The Story of Spanish and Mexican Mayólica

Overview

Brought to Spain in the thirteenth century by Islamic artisans, the enameled earthenware known as mayólica is decorated with a lead glaze to which tin oxide is added to create an opaque white surface. By the fifteenth century, several areas in Spain were well known throughout Europe for the quality of these ceramics, and with Spain's expansion into the New World the mayólica tradition came into Mexico. There it underwent further changes, notably the use of indigenous design motifs and patterns inspired by Chinese...

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Overview

Brought to Spain in the thirteenth century by Islamic artisans, the enameled earthenware known as mayólica is decorated with a lead glaze to which tin oxide is added to create an opaque white surface. By the fifteenth century, several areas in Spain were well known throughout Europe for the quality of these ceramics, and with Spain's expansion into the New World the mayólica tradition came into Mexico. There it underwent further changes, notably the use of indigenous design motifs and patterns inspired by Chinese porcelain. Over the next three centuries, the potters of New Spain produced ceramics characterized by a distinctive mestizo aesthetic. This tradition continues today in both Mexico and Spain.

Assembled in connection with a major exhibition at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, this book moves discussion of mayólica beyond its stylistic merits in order to understand it in historic and cultural context. The contributors, specialists in art and art history, architecture, anthropology, archaeology, and the folk arts, place the ceramics in history and daily life, illustrating their place in trade and economics. Examining both historic and contemporary examples, they also take us into the potters' workshops.

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Editorial Reviews

Colonial Latin American Historical Review
Well written and generously illustrated, the editors of this magnificent volume have contributed to a better understanding of the history and cultural significance of the enameled earthenware known as mayólica.
Inside Antiques
First rate coverage of remakable ceramics.
Journal of Anthropological Research
The most comprehensive treatment of majolica in the Spanish-American world that is available today. It is furthermore an extremely beautiful book, with many extraordinary pieces of majolica published for the first time. . . . An invaluable contribution not only to majolica studies but to the integration of European and American scholars around a theme that has been, until now, largely segregated. The book is beautifully produced and reasonably priced. It is a must-have for anyone interested in ceramics.
SMRC Revista
Anyone who studies or collects mayólica will want this book!
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826331021
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2003
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 950,620
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author


Robin Farwell Gavin is curator of Spanish Colonial collections at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe.

Donna Pierce is curator of Spanish Colonial Art in the New World Department of the Denver Art Museum.

Alfonzo Pleguezuelo is professor of art history at the University of Seville.

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Opening Remarks
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Centers of Traditional Spanish Mayolica 24
2 Ceramics in Domestic Life in Spain 48
3 The Use of Spanish Ceramics in Architecture 76
4 Ceramics, Business, and Economy 102
5 Traditional Ceramics in Contemporary Sevilla 122
6 Baroque to Neobaroque in Barcelona 150
7 Traditional Ceramic Production in Spain Today 170
8 Mexican Ceramics in Spain 186
9 The Emergence of a Mexican Tile Tradition 204
10 The Forgotten Potters of Mexico City 226
11 Mayolica in the Daily Life of Colonial Mexico 244
12 The Revival of Puebla Mayolica in the Twentieth Century 270
13 The Mayolica of Guanajuato 296
14 The Loza Blanca Tradition of Aguascalientes 314
Bibliography 339
Index 351
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