Cezanne and the Apple Boy

Overview


This brand-new title in Laurence Anholt's beautifully illustrated children's series of stories about famous artists recounts a wonderful adventure experienced by Paul, a little boy who is named after his father, Paul Cézanne. The elder Cézanne had been away from home for so long that the boy has difficulty recognizing his father when he joins him on a painting expedition in the mountains of southern France. They quickly become fast friends, and the artist takes great pleasure in painting a portrait of his ...
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Overview


This brand-new title in Laurence Anholt's beautifully illustrated children's series of stories about famous artists recounts a wonderful adventure experienced by Paul, a little boy who is named after his father, Paul Cézanne. The elder Cézanne had been away from home for so long that the boy has difficulty recognizing his father when he joins him on a painting expedition in the mountains of southern France. They quickly become fast friends, and the artist takes great pleasure in painting a portrait of his apple-cheeked son. Most of his paintings, however, are landscapes of the mountain country where they are camping, although the people who live nearby often laugh at the artist's pictures, which they think are poor. But young Paul admires his father's work--and he is not alone. A picture dealer from Paris happens to be in the region, and when he sees Cézanne's paintings, he thinks they are wonderful. Before long, Cézanne becomes famous and wealthy. The story, enhanced with Laurence Anholt's illustrations on every page, include several that are reproductions of Cézanne's famous paintings.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The narrative flows naturally and deals with some difficult issues. . . in an age-appropriate and sensitive fashion. . . . Anholt's charming watercolor and pen illustrations re-create a time and place that will be unfamiliar to most [young] readers . . . . Most important, the title conveys the idea that artists are real people fulfilling a purpose that may not be understood in the context of their everyday lives." --School Library Journal

". . . this charming introduction to Paul Cezanne highlights the artist's relationship with his son. . . . Evocative, realistic illustrations mix with reproductions of Cezanne's works and. . . will draw kids into this enjoyable, informative portrayal of Cezanne as both a father and an influential artist." --Booklist

"In this solid addition to Anholt's Artists series, Paul Cézanne invites his son to visit him in the countryside. Steeped in metaphor (mountain and apple themes recur), Anholt's dialogue-driven narrative successfully reveals the painter's eccentricities and his bond with his son. The book's layered illustrations include reproductions of Cézanne's paintings incorporated into Anholt's watercolors, many of which feature the Provence landscapes so prominent in the painter's work. Anholt gives several nods to Cézanne masterpieces, as when father and son sit on a ledge overlooking the panorama depicted in Mont Sainte-Victoire and two men in a cafe mimic the subjects of The Card Players."

--Publisher's Weekly, November 2009

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Arnholt introduces Cezanne the painter in a story based on a visit by the artist's son Paul from his Paris home to his father out in the country. He finds his father "painting crazy pictures" up on a mountain path. People laugh at both the artist's strange, reclusive nature and his new kind of painting. Feeling unsuccessful, Cezanne thinks that he will have to find a different kind of work, but art dealer Vollard takes some of his paintings to sell. To their surprise, he sells them all, and the artist's recognition begins. The affection between father and son is evident despite their frequent separation. Young Paul is proud of his father and becomes a successful dealer of his work. The simply told biographical story is visualized in scenes and vignettes structured in Cezanne's cubist style, including reproductions of several of his paintings. These add zest to the other simplified naturalistic illustrations of southern France and the characters. Further information about the artist is added in this eighth of Arnholt's "Artists books for children" series. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Publishers Weekly
In this solid addition to Anholt’s Artists series, Paul Cézanne invites his son to visit him in the countryside. Arriving by train, the boy finds his father on a mountainside, “making a wild painting.” He leads his son to the summit, remarking, “It’s a long way, but if we follow the path, we won’t get lost.” When villagers deride the artist’s work, he tells the boy, “The world doesn’t understand me and I don’t understand the world.” But a stranger appreciates Cézanne’s paintings and brings them to Paris, where they sell quickly. Steeped in metaphor (mountain and apple themes recur), Anholt’s dialogue-driven narrative successfully reveals the painter’s eccentricities and his bond with his son. The book’s layered illustrations include reproductions of Cézanne’s paintings incorporated into Anholt’s watercolors, many of which feature the Provence landscapes so prominent in the painter’s work. Anholt gives several nods to Cézanne masterpieces, as when father and son sit on a ledge overlooking the panorama depicted in Mont Sainte-Victoire and two men in a cafe mimic the subjects of The Card Players. Ages 4–7. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 1–4—This addition to Anholt's series about famous artists features Paul Cézanne, the post-impressionist considered by some to be the father of cubism. It relates a fictional episode in the painter's life, a summer in which his son visits and (along with readers) comes to see his father's life as a struggling innovator. As luck would have it, it is this same summer that a visiting art dealer is taken with Cézanne's originality, thus marking the beginning of his success as a painter. The narrative flows naturally and deals with some difficult issues—the painter's phobia about being touched, his estrangement from his family, and the disregard for his efforts—in an age-appropriate and sensitive fashion, though attentive readers may find more questions than answers. Anholt's charming watercolor and pen illustrations re-create a time and place that will be unfamiliar to most readers and feature homages to Cézanne's most famous works. Most important, the title coveys the idea that artists are real people fulfilling a purpose that may not be understood in the context of their everyday lives.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Kirkus Reviews
Anholt continues his series of picture books about children and great artists with this homey episode about Paul Cezanne and his son, also named Paul. The highly eccentric painter has lived apart from young Paul and his mother for years, and as the tale opens, he has just invited his son to visit him in the Provencal countryside, where the boy finally finds him on a mountainside, painting. As the two get to know each other, Cezanne explains his theory of painting: "I make everything into simple shapes . . . .You are as round as a sweet little apple!" A chance meeting with a Parisian art dealer leads to recognition and success and ultimately to young Paul's future career as his father's agent. It's a simply told tale that emphasizes the father-son relationship; lessons about Cezanne's importance in the canon are slipped in sideways. Tiny reproductions of Cezanne's works are integrated into the author's customarily loose, bright watercolors to illustrate those lessons. An author's note rounds out the background of the story and indicates that young Paul's grandson, Philippe Cezanne, assisted in its making. (Picture book. 5-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764162824
  • Publisher: Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/1/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 266,122
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Lexile: AD530L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 11.60 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Laurence Anholt's popular books for children have been published in 15 different languages, including Cantonese, Hebrew, and Icelandic. As both an author and an accomplished illustrator, he has created a charming series of children's stories about famous artists. He and his wife Catherine, both successful authors of juvenile titles, have three children, from whom they get many of their story ideas. They live and work in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.
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