Change

Change

by Chick Corea
     
 

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Corea updates his approach every few years, and the rich acoustic sounds of his latest band Origin find him revitalized once again. After seven discs of live material (a 6-cd boxed set and a debut single album were all cut last year at New York's Blue Note club), the sextet glistens on its first studio date. Rather than a blowing session, CHANGE has the band…  See more details below

Overview

Corea updates his approach every few years, and the rich acoustic sounds of his latest band Origin find him revitalized once again. After seven discs of live material (a 6-cd boxed set and a debut single album were all cut last year at New York's Blue Note club), the sextet glistens on its first studio date. Rather than a blowing session, CHANGE has the band negotiating the pianist's cunning arrangements. As usual rhythmic scope is flaunted - - "Wigwam" is a glowing pulse piece that uses a marimba; it's followed by a puckish tango and bright flamenco that recall the vivacious moves of Corea's 1976 classic MY SPANISH HEART. But while the six players aptly negotiate this music, convolution remains one of the composer's bugaboos - - there's a tad too much intricacy in the program's second half. The motion of "L.A. Scenes" is skittish; "The Spinner" is slightly overwritten. Luckily Origin makes the most of such elaborations. From saxophonist Steve Wilson's mercurial lines to drummer Jeff Ballard's hushed way with polyrhythms, the group speaks with a collective authority. Perhaps that comes from the leader's example. Throughout, Corea's own playing steadily reveals how jazz is a music of subtlety. If the music on CHANGE has a hallmark, it's grace.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richard S. Ginell
Following the massive live outpouring of music that marked the debut of Corea's band Origin, this studio album begins to fulfill some of the sextet's possibilities; hence, the completely appropriate title. The front line is unchanged from the live albums (Steve Wilson and Bob Sheppard on reeds and flutes, Steve Davis on trombone), Avishai Cohen remains on bass, and Jeff Ballard replaces Adam Cruz on drums. Again, though everyone solos and interacts intelligently and energetically, Corea is still Origin's most distinctive presence, and he reinforces his dominance by being the album's sole composer, save for Cohen's "Lylah." Corea makes his debut on marimba on the leadoff track, "Wigwam," which he plays in an Afro-Cuban-spiced manner (his Spanish tinge on marimba is even more pronounced in live performance). "Armando's Tango" sends the Latin explorations further South, while "Little Flamenco" is a busy, highly syncopated, high-energy outing driven by a simulation of flamenco hand-clapping by Ballard with nice flute work by Wilson. But when "Early Afternoon Blues" harkens back to bedrock hard bop in every respect, straight out of Blue Note, the CD settles pretty much back into the mainstream with a few quirky compositional motifs to pique your interest. The best tune on the CD is the closer, "Awakening," which echoes all the way back to Corea's triumphant RTF album Where Have I Known You Before.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/08/1999
Label:
Stretch Records
UPC:
0013431902324
catalogNumber:
9023

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