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The Change Guy
     

The Change Guy

3.8 7
by Sheila Lee Brown
 

This is a short story about a strange old man named Jimmy Ray who walks the streets looking for coins. He has a secret no one would guess. The story has a lovely flow to it that leads you down an unexpected path.

Overview

This is a short story about a strange old man named Jimmy Ray who walks the streets looking for coins. He has a secret no one would guess. The story has a lovely flow to it that leads you down an unexpected path.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940011259579
Publisher:
Sheila Lee Brown
Publication date:
04/08/2011
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,239,925
File size:
180 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Sheila Lee Brown was born and raised in South Carolina where she spent her childhood playing outdoors in the surrounding woods, making up stories with her three siblings. She currently lives in Raleigh, North Carolina where she writes, reads, draws silly cartoons, enjoys eating raw food and learning and growing.


Book collaborations (can be found in print on Lulu.com):


Hope & Josie Go to the Prom (with Kathy Jeffords)


Beyond the Clouds (short story collection with six other authors)

Customer Reviews

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Change Guy 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kind of nrat, but so sad too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nice short story, 10 pages. Would make an interesting longer story. Recommend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderfull idea
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Psychoword More than 1 year ago
Sheila Lee Brown's short story, The Change Guy, has a very unique story idea, which I really appreciated. However, Brown's writing style leaves a little to be desired. The majority of the entire story we are led by Brown's telling of the story, instead of showing some of the scenes as the short story progressed. I wanted to be able to see a scene where someone looked at the main character oddly as he cleared coins from vending machines, instead of just being told that he didn't respond. Several of the short scene ideas were simply laid out for the reader to hear the author's opinion of how the scene was to be viewed, instead of showing the scene to allow each reader to make their own insights. The creativity of Brown is worth the opportunity to read this work, but don't expect too much along the way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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