Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy

( 9 )

Overview


It?s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can?t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. ...

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Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy

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Overview


It’s no wonder American higher education is facing a crisis.

While low-income students can’t find a spot in their local community colleges for lack of funding, public four-year universities are spending staggering sums on luxurious residence halls, ever-bigger football stadiums, and obscure research institutes. We have cosseted our most advantaged students even as we deny access to the working adults who urgently need higher education to advance their careers and our economy. In Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy, Andrew S. Rosen clearly and entertainingly details how far the American higher education system has strayed from the goals of access, quality, affordability, and accountability that should characterize our system, and offers a prescription to restore American educational pre-eminence.

To change, our system will have to end its reflexive opposition to anything new and different. Rosen describes how each new wave of innovation and expansion of educational access— starting with the founding of Harvard in 1636, and continuing with the advent of land-grant colleges in the 19th century, community colleges in the 20th century and private sector colleges over the last two decades—has been met with misunderstanding and ridicule. When colleges like the University of California, Cornell and Purdue were founded, they were scorned as “pretenders to the title of university” – language that tracks later criticisms of community colleges and most recently for-profit colleges.

Avoiding that condescension is just one of the reasons colleges have come under the sway of “Harvard Envy” – schools that were founded to expand access feel an inexorable tug to become more prestigious and exclusive. Even worse, the competition for the best students has led universities to turn themselves into full-fledged resorts; they’ve built climbing walls, French bistros and 20-person hot-tubs to entice students to their campuses.

How can America address an incentive system in higher education that is mismatched to the challenges of the years ahead? In Change.edu, Rosen outlines “seven certainties” of education in the coming 25 years, and presents an imperative for how our system must prepare for the coming changes. He proposes a new “playbook” for dealing with the change ahead, one that will enable American higher education to regain its global primacy and be a catalyst for economic growth in the 21st century.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Rosen, chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc., has written a smart, easy-to-read overview of the weaknesses of colleges and universities and the benefits of the fast-growing private-sector colleges, one of which, Kaplan University, he heads. He argues that too many public and private universities focus on campus amenities and institutional prestige rather than what their students learn and that community colleges provide access but have an unsustainable financial model. Private-sector universities prosper only because they give students new skills, so they pay close attention to what their students learn and how they can learn better. Rosen presents data and analyses that challenge the usual criticisms of private-sector universities—that they don't educate and they charge too much, misuse government funds, and recruit too aggressively. While this book will not quiet all critics, it effectively identifies weaknesses in both the nonprofit and the public sectors and should stimulate college presidents to reconsider some of their priorities. VERDICT A well-written and thought-provoking critique of contemporary higher education of interest to all readers concerned about the future strength of American society.—Elizabeth R. Hayford, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL
Kirkus Reviews
An enjoyable look back at the history of higher education in America and the startling new ways it might develop in the future. The author and CEO of test-prep powerhouse Kaplan is willing to doff his mortarboard to the Ivy League--but only because Rosen is absolutely convinced that one day, often maligned private-sector institutions like his will rule the day. Incredibly, his argument never comes off as self-serving; the author's thorough exploration of "Harvard Envy" and the rise of "resort" campuses is both fascinating and enlightening. He cites spiraling costs, dwindling budgets and improved technology as some of the many reasons behind this inevitable changeover. If America is going to compete with the global brain trust, the author argues, it will have to be done from behind a computer screen. The prestige that Ivy League schools command is largely due to their exclusivity, a fact that runs counter to the growing need to expose increasing numbers of people to higher education. Thus, somewhere in America, there is a college campus contemplating the highest rock-climbing wall in an effort to woo new students. That's just about as ridiculous as online distance learning--what might be thought of as the successor to old "correspondence courses"--becoming as viable as Yale or Duke. But both are happening. The U.S., writes Rosen, has no other choice but to look to virtual for-profit learning outlets like Kaplan and the University of Phoenix to boost the number of college graduates. Presently, this may be the subject of snide editorials and contemptuous hearings, but Rosen envisions a day when for-profit learning centers step up and fill the education gap much in the same way "land grant" and community colleges did in years past. The alternative, he fears, spells trouble for American supremacy in education.
From the Publisher
“…a smart, easy-to-read overview of the weaknesses of colleges and universities and the benefits of the fast-growing private-sector colleges…While this book will not quiet all the critics, it effectively identifies weaknesses in both the nonprofit and the public sectors and should stimulate college presidents to reconsider some of their priorities.” —School Library Journal

 “Presently, this may be the subject of snide editorials and contemptuous hearings, but Rosen envisions a day when for-profit learning centers step up and fill the education gap much in the same way “land grant” and community colleges did in years past. The alternative, he fears, spells trouble for American supremacy in education.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Andrew Rosen has written a great new book on higher education in America, Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy.  It is provocative, insightful, and mostly correct. Yet, I predict, it will be largely ignored by the higher-education community.”  —Richard Vedder, Innovations blog for The Chronicle of Higher Education

"Americans know that our primary and secondary schools are woefully under-performing but believe our colleges and universities are second to none.  Andy Rosen blows a big hole in that belief, showing that, just when we need to grow the number of students getting a high-quality post-secondary education, our state universities are in financial distress and our private schools are quickly becoming too costly for all but the wealthy.  This is a must-read book for those who care about fixing our nation's higher education problems before they become intractable." —Former New York City Schools Chancellor, Joel Klein

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607144410
  • Publisher: Kaplan Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/18/2011
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 655,382
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 5.52 (h) x 0.99 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew S. Rosen, CEO, Kaplan, Inc. is a leader in the rapidly changing education field, having pioneered the development of new learning technologies and formats that have expanded educational access to young people, working professionals, and non-traditional students across the globe. Previously, as CEO of the company’s largest business, Kaplan Higher Education, Rosen redefined the higher education landscape by bringing online and campus-based learning opportunities to working adults—more than 100,000 students across the country. As President of Kaplan University, Rosen led the school’s growth to more than 100 online programs and multiple campuses, and oversaw Concord Law School, the nation’s first online law school, and Kaplan Virtual Education, a leader in virtual high school instruction and curriculum development. Rosen holds an A.B. degree from Duke University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. Rosen currently serves on the boards of Enterprise Florida, the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, the Broward Workshop, and the Council for Educational Change.

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Table of Contents

Introduction ix

1 Harvard Envy: Why Too Many Colleges Overshoot 1

2 Club College: Why So Many Universities Look Like Resorts 39

3 The (Theoretically) Perfect Solution: The Challenge of Community Colleges 75

4 A Crucial Part of the Solution: How a New Kind of University Serves a New Kind of Student 105

5 The Case Against Private-Sector Higher Education: Facts That Critics Overlook 143

6 The Learning Playbook: 2036 and the Coming Twenty-Five Years of Change in Higher Education 179

Acknowledgments 205

Notes 209

Index 233

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2011

    Well researched and informative.

    The title caught my attention so I was happy to learn about the early history of Higher Education in the United States which is was I was expecting. But that is just the first 2 chapters and then it gave me a whole lot more to think about. I'm not sure if this book has all the answers to the current challenges facing Higher Ed in this country but Mr Rosen shines a light on a lot of information that has not been properly reported in the mainstream news media. It is a short and concise read with many points made with great clarity and force.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2011

    Great book!!! Highly recommended

    I must confess I had my own biases against the online universities but they have changed, the technology and deliver systems have changed (for the better) and this book shows how this industry is really coming into its own. Time to drop the pretense and get serious about educating adults young and old across the board. This book includes entertaining descriptions of higher ed back when Harvard was founded and some of the lunacy that is going on today with places like High Point paying their way up the University rankings scale and how that really ends up costing everyone. Education is still something we should believe is a worth while pursuing and this book illustrates how we can invest in that pursuit.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 3, 2011

    TIME WELL SPENT

    I know a little about what has been happening with online universities and our countries knee-jerk bias against them. Andrew Rosen starts with the early history of Higher Education in this country in order to make his point about what he sees as the ongoing snobbery and misdirection of funds and aspirations of the Ivory Tower set. Education has been the key to this country's success in the past and the way needs to be paved to help those disenfranchised from the current system so they can better themselves if they have a desire to get an education past high school. Not everyone got A's and B's in high school and now they may need to get a degree in order to improve their lives and stay employed. That whole group of human beings would benefit from options like online universities and flexible learning schedules but traditional institutions are moving at a snail's pace so of course a little entrepreneurial grit can help get that job done. A book well worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2011

    Don't waste another minute - read this book now!

    I love when a book is densely packed with fascinating details and thought provoking ideas. Mr Rosen shares his unique insight into what is happening in Higher Education and the pending crisis we will face as a country if we don't start fixing this part of our economy and society. Bravo for making concise points and making this engaging material for the general reader as well as the policy wonk.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 19, 2011

    informative and (surprisingly) interesting

    This book has a good balance of detail and readability...for a lay person like myself, it helped me understand how different colleges serve different purposes, but all are important for education/our country's future. Not sure if I agree with everything, but I think I learned a lot.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    For anyone interested in education, this is a must read! The ideas presented are thoughtful, well presented, and really make you think about higher education in this country.

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  • Posted November 1, 2011

    Fascinating!

    Informative and detailed look at the higher education ecosystem.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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