Changing Minds (Penguin Academics Series): Arguments on Contemporary and Enduring Issues

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Overview

Changing Minds is a collection of classic and contemporary readings designed to acquaint readers with strategies for developing effective, persuasive arguments and to demonstrate the rich and complex nature of persuasive writing through essays from a wide variety of contexts.

An introductory chapter presents essential elements of argument, as well as common strategies and misunderstandings, and is followed by nine thematic chapters, each including a brief introduction and eight essays. The thematic chapters integrate opportunities for stengthening reading and critical thinking skills through a focus on issues that have had an evolving and controversial history.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205568130
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 7/30/2009
  • Series: Pearson English Value Textbook Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 582
  • Sales rank: 1,125,235
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface to Changing Minds

Chapter One: Introduction to Writing and Reading Arguments

What is Argument?

Deductive Reasoning in Argument

Induction in Argument

Honest and Faulty Uses of Emotion in Argument

Different Types of Arguments and Claims

Reading and Critiquing Arguments

Annotated Professional Argument:

H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz, and Steven Wloshin,”What’s Making Us Sick is an Epidemic of Diagnoses.”

Chapter Two: Recreating the Family

Mary Pipher, “Saplings in the Storm”

Judith Schor, “Decommercializing Childhood”

Rachel Lehmann-Haupt, “Multi-Tasking Man”

Judith Warner, “For a Politics of Quality of Life”

Jonathan Rauch, “A More Perfect Union”

Marilyn Freundlich and Pew Charitable Trust staff, “Time for Reform Aging Out and on Their Own “

Differing perspectives: How can individuals and social institutions help to sustain marriages and reduce the rate of divorce?

Judith Wallerstein, “The Legacy of Divorce”

Theodroa Ooms, “Marriage Plus”

Chapter Three: Educating a Nation

Linda Darling-Hammond, “Unequal Opportunity: Race and Education”

Robert Kubey, “How Media Education Can Promote Democracy”

Lowell Monke, “ Unplugged Schools”

James Traub, “Drive Through U: Higher Education for People Who Mean Business”

Dacia Charlesworth, “Which Number Will You Be?”

Brita Belli, “Greener U.”

Differing Perspectives: Does high stakes uniform achievement testing do more harm than good?

Secretary of Education Roderick Paige,”Testing Makes for Progress in Learning

David C. Berliner and Sharon Nichols, “High Stakes Testing is Putting the Nation at Risk”

Chapter Four: Revisioning Immigration

Carolyn Lochhead, “A Legacy of The Unforeseen” Text print Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. “The Return of the Melting Pot”

Herbert J. Gans, “The American Kaleidoscope, Then and Now”

Dinesh D’Souza, “Becoming American”

Linda Chavez, “Hispanics and the American Dream”

Alejandro Portes, “Immigration's Aftermath”

Differing Perspectives: Should documented immigrants have the right to vote in local elections?

Ronald Hayduk, “Democracy for All: Restoring Immigrant Voting Rights in the US”

Stanley A. Renshon, “The Debate Over Non-Citizen Voting:A Primer”

Chapter Five: Engaging Work

Bertrand Russell, “In Praise of Idleness”

Stuart Tannock “On the Front Lines of the Public Service Sector”

Jyoti Thottam,” Is Your Job Going Abroad?”

Lisa Takeuchi Cullen, “Legacy of Dreams”

Willian Greider, “Work Rules”

Steven Greenhouse, “Millions of Jobs of a Different Collar”

Differing Perspectives: Should work make us happy?

Alain De Botton, “Workers of the World, Relax: The Pursuit of Happiness”

bel hooks, “Work Makes Life Sweet”

Chapter Six: Censoring Extreme Speech

Douglass, Frederick, “A Plea for Free Speech in Boston”

Nat Hentoff, , “‘Speech Codes’ on the Campus and Problems of Free Speech”

Richard Delgado, “Hate Speech Harms Public Discourse”

Mary Beth Marklein, “Free Speech for You But Not for Me?”

Stanley Fish, “Conspiracy Theories 10l”

Richard Goldstein “Celebrity Bigots: Why Hate is Hot “

Differing Perspectives: Should internet hate-speech be regulated by international law?

David Matas, ”Countering Hate on the Internet: Recommendations for Action”

Sandy Starr, “Why We Need Free Speech Online”

Chapter Seven: Blaming the Media for Youth Violence

Sissela Bok, “Aggression and the Impact of Media Violence”

Mike Males, “Stop Blaming Kids and TV”

Soledad Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig A. Anderson, “Media and Risky Behaviors: Aggressive and Violent Behavior”

Brian Cowlishaw, “Playing War: Real Combat Video Games”

Jonathan L. Freedman, “Evaluating the Research on Violent Video Games”

Henry Jenkins, “Congressional Testimony on Media Violence”

Differing Perspectives: Is media violence a result of the battle for ratings or our own cultural values?

George Gerbner and Todd Gitlin “A Debate “Is Media Violence Free Speech?’ ”

Chapter Eight: Speaking Out About Pop Music

Ellen Willis, “Crowds and Freedom”

Deena Weinstein, “Creativity and Band Dynamics”

Frank Zappa, “Statement to Congress Before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation”

Greg Graffin, “A Punk Manifesto”

Imani Perry, “The Venus Hip Hop and the Pink Ghetto”

James Cusick “Politicians Might Hear, But Does Popular Culture Have the Power to Make Them Act?”

Differing Perspectives: Should college students on campus be the target of recording industry crackdowns on illegal downloading.?

Kenneth C Green, “The Music Industry Spring Offensive”

Mich Bainwall and Cary Sherman, “Explaining the Crackdown on Student Downloading”

Chapter Nine: Spying and Privacy

Ted Koppel, “Take My Privacy, Please!”

Amitai Etzioni, “Less Privacy Is Good for Us (and You)”

David Brin, “Three Cheers for the Surveillance Society!”

Bruce Schneier “The Myth of the ‘Transparent Society’”

International Working Group on Data Protection in Telecommunications,

“Rome Memorandum: Report and Guidance on Privacy in Social Network Services”

Jeffrey Rosen “The Naked Crowd”

Differing Perspectives: Has the Patriot Act made us feel safer at the cost of privacy?

Ramesh Ponnuru, “1984 in 2003?”

James Bovard, “Surveillance State”

Chapter Ten: Changing Nature

Daniel Glick, “The Big Thaw”

Richard S. Lindzen, “Don't Believe the Hype”

Al Gore, “Policy Address on Global Warming”

Phil Mattera, “Is Corporate Greenwashing Headed for a Fall?”

Abby Schultz “To Offset or Not?”

Dara Colwell, “Carbon Offsets: Buying Your Way Out of Responsibility”

Differing Perspectives: Will genetically engineered crops and organisms help us survive climate change or further upset the balance of nature?

Jeremy Rifkin, “Biotech Century: Playing Russian Roulette with Mother Nature’s Designs”

Jonathan Rauch, “Will Frankenfood Save the Planet?”

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