Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America

Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America

by Karen Anderson
     
 

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An interpretive history of working class Mexican American, African American, and American Indian women in the last century underlining the specific and common experiences of the three groups. Anderson (history, U. of Arizona) blends historical analysis, politics, and cultural considerations to show how forced acculturation of American Indian women subordinated their… See more details below

Overview

An interpretive history of working class Mexican American, African American, and American Indian women in the last century underlining the specific and common experiences of the three groups. Anderson (history, U. of Arizona) blends historical analysis, politics, and cultural considerations to show how forced acculturation of American Indian women subordinated their traditional powers, the contradictory pressures Mexican American women experience in their place between cultures, and African American women's migration from plantation to urban centers with the subsequent shifts in their social and political situations.

Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Editorial Reviews

The Midwest Book Review
This history of ethnic women in modern America explores the lives and extent of discrimination against women in this country. From clashes between Native American tribes and the government to discussions of the politics affecting Mexican-American women, this provides an excellent, wide-reaching examination of underlying influences on ethnic women's lives.
Library Journal
Anderson (history, Univ. of Arizona) traces the complex patterns of discrimination against three major groups of racial ethnic women in the United States in the 20th century: Native American, Mexican American, and African American. Focusing on specific issues of employment, family relationships, and the role of gender in relation to race and class, Anderson sketches the resulting internal conflicts within an ethnic group as well as conflict with the dominant culture. Federal government intervention in acculturating Native Americans, for example, not only created conflict between whites and Native Americans but also disrupted social, economic, and family relationships within Native American groups. Anderson's scholarly study adds valuable perspectives from racial ethnic women to a richer understanding of American history. Appropriate for college and women's studies collections.Patricia A. Beaber, Trenton State Coll. Lib., N.J.
Booknews
An interpretive history of working class Mexican American, African American, and American Indian women in the last century underlining the specific and common experiences of the three groups. Anderson (history, U. of Arizona) blends historical analysis, politics, and cultural considerations to show how forced acculturation of American Indian women subordinated their traditional powers, the contradictory pressures Mexican American women experience in their place between cultures, and African American women's migration from plantation to urban centers with the subsequent shifts in their social and political situations. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"Anderson shows how dramatically different the discrimination experience and the struggle for equality are for women in three ethnic groups, Native American, Mexican American, and African American.... Anderson's rich, exciting book highlights their specific problems, shows how racism undermines their efforts at achieving equality, and provides a historical perspective for a better understanding of the current situations of these women."—Booklist

"Anderson understands fully the complexity and intricacy of the double and triple binds that have shaped the lives of minority women in America. Her book provides a wonderful opportunity to assess the rich variety of women's experience, and to understand with more precision how the structural constraints of race, class, and gender have functioned to shape women's lives."—William H. Chafe, Dean of the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Duke University

"Karen Anderson's Changing Woman replicates the phrase's meaning in Navajo—a symbol of cyclical change and improvement, a beneficent deity. Her weighty treatment of the cultural situations through history of Native American, Mexican American, and African American women is a treasure of information and insight. This is another wonderful resource for readers of women's history."—Linda Wagner-Martin, Hanes Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

"In demonstrating that 'there is no one pattern in the ways women of color have struggled for equality,' Karen Anderson places Native American, Mexican American, and African American women at the center of her analysis. She offers, thereby, a sobering portrait of both the accomplishments and failures of the feminist movement. Anderson's insightful concentration on the 'women who live at the margins of political and cultural power' forces us to rethink everything we thought we knew about the history of women in twentieth-century America."—Annette Kolodny, author of The Lay of the Land and The Land Before Her

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198022138
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
07/24/1997
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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