Charismatic Chaos

Charismatic Chaos

3.7 4
by John MacArthur
     
 

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The charismatic movement of the past quarter-century has made an impact on the church unparalleled in history. But one legacy of the movement is confusion and mushy thinking. In Charismatic Chaos, John F. MacArthur calls for biblical evaluation and analyzes the doctrinal differences between charismatics and non-charismatics in the light of Scripture. "My principal

Overview

The charismatic movement of the past quarter-century has made an impact on the church unparalleled in history. But one legacy of the movement is confusion and mushy thinking. In Charismatic Chaos, John F. MacArthur calls for biblical evaluation and analyzes the doctrinal differences between charismatics and non-charismatics in the light of Scripture. "My principal concern," writes John MacArthur, "is to call the church to a firm commitment to the purity and authority of the Scriptures, and thereby to strengthen the unity of the true church." To tough questions that seem to divide, Charismatic Chaos provides tougher answers that strive to unite. This book tackles such questions as - Is experience a valid test of truth? - Does God still give revelation? - Prophets, fanatics, or heretics? - Does God still heal? - What should we think of the Signs and Wonders movement? - Does the Bible promise health and wealth?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780310575726
Publisher:
Zondervan
Publication date:
07/01/1993
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
383,773
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, president of the Master’s College and Seminary, and featured teacher with the Grace to You media ministry. In more than four decades of ministry, John has written dozens of bestselling books, including The MacArthur Study Bible, The Gospel According to Jesus, and Slave. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Charismatic Chaos 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I spent many years in the Charismatic movement, and was never quite comfortable with it. After reading this book, it becomes crystal clear why. It isn't because the practices aren't understandable to the human mind, but because they are not appropriate to this age. I appreciate the myriad scripture references that I could re-read for myself, with new eyes, and a clearer understanding. Thank you, Mr. MacArthur. Now it all makes sense why the utter chaos didn't feel right.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Purchased the book for Dr. MacArthur's views on speaking in tongues and found a wealth of solid Biblically based information on the whole question of charismatics.
Guest More than 1 year ago
John MacArthur does an outstanding job addressing this controversial subject. He presents his information in a clear, well-thought out, and fair way. Contradictions, false prophecies, and experiences of the Charismatic movement are highlighted and shown for what they are --- not from God. I highly recommend this title for anyone searching for answers on this topic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is quite a sight to see Christian in-fighting. It's even more entertaining to read it in prints. On the surface, the book is about taking issue with some of the practices of a certain stream of Christians, namely, the Charismatic. MacArthur found some of their practices problematic, such as speaking in tongue, healing, slaying in the spirit, etc.. MacArthur wants to ground his arguments on the scriptures but had to square away some potential tension first. Because the Christian Bible too is filled with the 'chaotic' practices that he found problematic. This explains why, in addition to warning people about the Charismatic movement, he also needs to allocate some book length to explain away the apparent conflicts between Bible and his stance on things. I think MacArthur is sincere about his opposition against the Charismatics (as we could detect between the lines of his hostility). But we might gain a better insight into the book by trying to answer this question: what exactly is in these practices that makes them appear problematic to MacArthur? What common factor or element exists in these Charismatic practices that seems to inevitably invite or to arouse so strong of a suspicion and hostility? The culprit, I believe, is the fact that all these practices are immediately out-of-reach to human understanding. In other words, they are beyond human control. Things like speaking in tongue and prayers for healing are not part of our everyday experience, nor can anyone understand the inner mechanics of them. It is this 'unmanageability' inherited in these practices that have provoked so strong of a disliking from MacArthur. The emotion was apparently so strong and deep that it eventually drove this book into completion. It is easy to detect a subtle sense of condescending in between the lines of the book. Say, after all, 'proper' Christians do not do these 'unrefined' and 'superstitious' things. The book, it appears, is basically started by MacArthur been emotinally offended by these 'chaotic' (read unmanageable) Charismatic practices. The verdict was decided already. What's left was how to justify this lack of 'due process'. So MacArthur offered stories, Bible verses and interpretations to back up his conclusion. But the 'evidence' were apparently just an afterthought. I don't know enough to pass an educated judgment on whether or not the Charismatic Christians are doing the right thing, though they do seem a bit strange to me. But I found MacArthur's stance even stranger. He takes issues with phenomenon that he found to be beyond human understanding and control. So the implicit point of his entire book is that Christians are to reject things that they do not understand. But I thought MacArthur believes in God, whom, I take it, tends to do things that human being don't understand.