Charles Dickens: 7 non-fiction books [NOOK Book]

Overview

This book-collection file includes: American Notes for General Circulation, a Child's History of England, The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices, Miscellaneous Papers, Pictures from Italy, Reprinted Pieces, and Speeches: Literary and Social. According to Wikipedia: "Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 - 1870), pen-name "Boz", was one of the most popular English novelists of the Victorian era as well as a vigorous social campaigner. Critics George Gissing and G. K. Chesterton championed Dickens's mastery ...
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Charles Dickens: 7 non-fiction books

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Overview

This book-collection file includes: American Notes for General Circulation, a Child's History of England, The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices, Miscellaneous Papers, Pictures from Italy, Reprinted Pieces, and Speeches: Literary and Social. According to Wikipedia: "Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 - 1870), pen-name "Boz", was one of the most popular English novelists of the Victorian era as well as a vigorous social campaigner. Critics George Gissing and G. K. Chesterton championed Dickens's mastery of prose, his endless invention of unique, clever personalities, and his powerful social sensibilities, but fellow writers such as George Henry Lewes, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf faulted his work for sentimentality, implausible occurrences, and grotesque characterizations. The popularity of Dickens's novels and short stories has meant that they have never gone out of print. Many of Dickens's novels first appeared in periodicals and magazines in serialized form-a popular format for fiction at the time-and, unlike many other authors who completed entire novels before serial production commenced, Dickens often composed his works in parts, in the order in which they were meant to appear. Such a practice lent his stories a particular rhythm, punctuated by one minor "cliffhanger" after another, to keep the (original) public looking forward to the next installment."
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940000730201
  • Publisher: B&R Samizdat Express
  • Publication date: 10/20/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 716,896
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens is probably the greatest novelist England ever produced. His innate comic genius and shrewd depictions of Victorian life -- along with his memorable characters -- have made him beloved by readers the world over. In Dickens' books live some of the most repugnant villains in literature, as well as some of the most likeable (and unlikely) heroes.

Biography

Born on February 7, 1812, Charles Dickens was the second of eight children in a family burdened with financial troubles. Despite difficult early years, he became the most successful British writer of the Victorian age.

In 1824, young Charles was withdrawn from school and forced to work at a boot-blacking factory when his improvident father, accompanied by his mother and siblings, was sentenced to three months in a debtor's prison. Once they were released, Charles attended a private school for three years. The young man then became a solicitor's clerk, mastered shorthand, and before long was employed as a Parliamentary reporter. When he was in his early twenties, Dickens began to publish stories and sketches of London life in a variety of periodicals.

It was the publication of Pickwick Papers (1836-1837) that catapulted the twenty-five-year-old author to national renown. Dickens wrote with unequaled speed and often worked on several novels at a time, publishing them first in monthly installments and then as books. His early novels Oliver Twist (1837-1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1838-1839), The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1841), and A Christmas Carol (1843) solidified his enormous, ongoing popularity. As Dickens matured, his social criticism became increasingly biting, his humor dark, and his view of poverty darker still. David Copperfield (1849-1850), Bleak House (1852-1853), Hard Times (1854), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1861), and Our Mutual Friend (1864-1865) are the great works of his masterful and prolific period.

In 1858 Dickens's twenty-three-year marriage to Catherine Hogarth dissolved when he fell in love with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. The last years of his life were filled with intense activity: writing, managing amateur theatricals, and undertaking several reading tours that reinforced the public's favorable view of his work but took an enormous toll on his health. Working feverishly to the last, Dickens collapsed and died on June 8, 1870, leaving The Mystery of Edwin Drood uncompleted.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of David Copperfield.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles John Huffam Dickens (full name) "Boz" (pen name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1812
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portsmouth, England
    1. Date of Death:
      June 18, 1870
    2. Place of Death:
      Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2015

    Violet

    That's true, Dawn. My highschool is starting to do a dystopian program: where you get classes based on what you are good at, not what you like to do. Also, all ADD is now classified as ADHD.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2015

    Dawn&star

    I am well...one of the more advanced kids. I never think about what it must be like for other kids. This is just...eye-opening.
    <br>
    <p>
    ~Dawn&star

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2015

    Wonderful!

    I love it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2015

    Monkey King

    I love it!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2015

    (non-)Gifted ~ Chapter 1

    "How'd y do on the GP test? It was so easy, I could do it again in my sleep & get a 100%!" Ainsley Shuster bragged, resting her arm on my shoulder like I was an arm-rest because of my hight. Honestly, I didn't want to talk about my 40%. We had gotten the results this morning from yesterday's test. <br> "Aw, I was /so/ close! I missed 90% by one question." A lie. I've gotten so wondrfully sly at lying in my life. To hide the tuth, of course. Ainsley, however, was so perfect at everything that she didn't need to lie. It was obvious that she wasn't as skilled as me. <br> "The must suck. Too bad you won't be joining us in GP! I heard we're gonna be making these cardboard boxes into glasses-like things that turn images upside-down in our next GP class. Don't worry, I'll let you look in my box when we're done!" She tried to look disappointed, but relief and satisfaction washed away any fake trace of sorrow on her face like how a drawing in the sand gets washed away by the incoming tide. "Wow, look at the time! We've gotta get to our GP class! Have fun." The class was soon weeded out; the gifted were the lake water that turned fresh and clean after beig pumped through the filter, and we were the dirt that they filtered out of their precious water. <p> A quarter of the class was all that was left after they went to their class. There was Logan, my best friend, Thomas, Alfred, Lee, Morgan, Kinley, and of course, me, Julie. Every non-gifted kid except me in Mrs. Daniel's room has some sort of disorder. Logan has ADHD, Thomas and Morgan have ADD, Alfred has terrets, and Lee and Kinley have some case of autism. Matter of fact, they just got released from Special Ed. But I don't think of my friends that way. They don't deserve to have labels slapped on their resume like a product in a grocery store. They're all my good friends. Don't ask me why I didn't pass the easiest test in the world. I don't like to share the stories of my head injuries with anyone other than my friends. <p> I sit next to Logan, pencil gripped tightly in my hand, staring down at the blank circles on my page. Mrs. Daniel always felt bad for us non-gifted kids while the rest got the day off to have fun and try experiments. So she gives us stupid "science" worksheets. Today's is to shade in and label the phases of the moon in order. Didn't she know that we learned this in kindergarden? My knuckles turn white and I realize that I'm squeezig the pencil too hard. I let go, rubbing my hand. Logan looks up. <br> "What's wrong, Julie? You look... depressed." I brush away my blonde hair to look at him. <br> "I just..." A sigh I did't expect pushed its way through my lips. "I don't think it's fair that the GP kids get to have all the fun. And it really reminds me how dumb I am every single week when they leave for their special class." I couldn't bear it anymore and had to look down. My hand went to my forehead, gigerly fingering the three scars and wincing. <br> "Don't say that, Julie. It isn't your fault that you got hurt and it isn't our that we're..." He had to drop his gaze too. "special." The last word was so faint that I could hardly make it out. <br> "Logan, I'm sick of people calling my friends 'special'. I'm sick of the non-gifted being treated like toddlers who don't know addition. And I want everyone to know just how gifted we really are." <p> I want you guys to know that this only happened in my former school, so I shouldn't be insulting anyone in GP-&#1071|Reflections&#9830

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    Dgdfdsfhfdfbgc

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    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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