Chasing China: A Daughter's Quest for Truth

( 3 )

Overview

After an episode of prejudice rocks her usually secure world, Mia hops a plane back to the country of her birth to search for details about her birth parents, and confront the feelings of abandonment she has kept buried throughout her life. What begins as a simple tour of the Chinese orphanage where she spent her first few years quickly becomes complicated as Mia fights to untangle the web of lies that is her finding details. As she follows the red thread back through her motherland, she is enamored by the ...
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Overview

After an episode of prejudice rocks her usually secure world, Mia hops a plane back to the country of her birth to search for details about her birth parents, and confront the feelings of abandonment she has kept buried throughout her life. What begins as a simple tour of the Chinese orphanage where she spent her first few years quickly becomes complicated as Mia fights to untangle the web of lies that is her finding details. As she follows the red thread back through her motherland, she is enamored by the history and culture of her heritage-strengthening her resolve to find the truth, even as Chinese officials struggle to keep it buried. With her unwavering spirit of determination, Mia battles the forces stacked against her and faces mystery, danger, a dash of romance, and finally a conclusion that will change her life. 91,000 words, 344 pages.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466478572
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 10/26/2011
  • Pages: 340
  • Sales rank: 500,353
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Kay Bratt is a child advocate and author, residing near the base of Wacau Mountain, in the rolling hills of Georgia with her husband, daughter, dog, and cat. In addition to coordinating small projects for the children of China, Kay is an active volunteer director for (AOW) An Orphans Wish. Kay lived in China for over four years and because of her experiences working with orphans, she strives to be the voice for children who cannot speak for themselves. If you would like to read more about the children she knew and loved in China, read her poignant memoir titled Silent Tears; A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage. Kay is also the author of A Thread Unbroken, a novel of courage and the unbreakable bond between a father and daughter.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Great book!

    I read the ebook version of this book. It was great. A lot of cultural details that can only come from having lived there. Heartwarming story of acceptance of where you came from and who you are. GREAT book to read for anyone considering adopting from China!

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  • Posted April 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Good Exploration Of Cross-Cultural Adoption

    Mia has come to China to discover the truth about her birth family. She is one of the many Chinese girls who were adopted overseas. Although Mia had a wonderful childhood and a loving adoptive family, part of her cannot rest until she discovers more about who she is, where she came from, and why her birth family deserted her at the age of one in a train station, leaving her to spend several years in a state-run orphanage before being adopted at age four.

    When Mia visits the orphanage where she lived with a translator, she is appalled at the shabbiness but even more at the emotional starvation the children there encounter. In order to feed, clothe and educate so many children, every minute of their day is strictly scheduled, and the caretakers don't have time to give praise or affection. The children are treated as items on an assembly line. Mia is also suspicious when her questions go unanswered or given an airy reply of "Later". She is unsure if her translator is giving her all the information the officials speak.

    As the days go by, Mia explores other avenues to discover her past. She meets Jax, another Chinese-American who helps her. Jax is in China on an internship and is willing to help Mia find out whatever they can. They post fliers and hunt down clues. Mia also starts to work with a group of foreign women; expatriates who are in China for a year or two and who have chosen the orphanage as a charity. Through these avenues, Mia gets closer to the truth, but it is uncertain if she will ever discover what occurred all those years ago.

    Kay Bratt has worked in the field of overseas adoption for many years. Chasing China allows her to educate readers as she entertains them, and to share the issues surrounding intercultural adoptions. This book is recommended for readers interested in adoption, and those interested in other cultures.

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  • Posted March 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Eye Opening

    I not only read this book, I had the good fortune to interview the author. Ms. Bratt spent 4 years volunteering in an orphanage in China. This novel is a work of fiction, based on her frustrations/experiences doing such work. As such, I decided not to critique the book for 'telling' the story vs. 'showing'. One cannot underestimate the power of experiences and emotions. That being said:
    This book quite n interesting read. I've never been to China. I've never studied the culture, government, economic policies and atrocities. Having stated that, I felt this book did a good job covering all of the above topic s without being prejudiced. Having said that I should add there will be others who might disagree. There are many parts of this story which are difficult to imagine happening to anyone, let alone small children. It is tragic and sad.
    Mia, the star of our journey, goes 'home' to find her birth parents. She is young, naive and alone. However, she quickly finds friends to help along her path. Without any paperwork to point her in any direction, she traipses about the country.
    As a mother, this terrified me. I kept waiting for someone to snatch her up and lock her away for asking too many questions.
    As a friend to those who've adopted, I wondered...would this be a good book for them to read? Would they be willing to share this with their adopted children at a certain age?
    I honestly have no idea. I would recommend it. It is eye opening and heartwarming. The best message: Mia would never again need to go chasing China.

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