Ch'at to Yinilo'/Frog Brings Rain

Ch'at to Yinilo'/Frog Brings Rain

by Patricia Hruby Powell, Kendrick Benally
     
 
As fire creeps toward the village of the First People, First Man and First Woman must find a way to quench the flames. First Woman asks the Bird People, the River People, and the Water People for assistance, but everyone she speaks to has an excuse. Not me, said Mockingbird. The smoke would hurt my voice and I would never sing again. Not me, said Snail. I carry my

Overview

As fire creeps toward the village of the First People, First Man and First Woman must find a way to quench the flames. First Woman asks the Bird People, the River People, and the Water People for assistance, but everyone she speaks to has an excuse. Not me, said Mockingbird. The smoke would hurt my voice and I would never sing again. Not me, said Snail. I carry my house with me and I am slow. No, said Beaver. We'd like to help, but our river home would become a desert if we changed the flow of water. At last, First Woman asks the mysterious Frog for help. Will he be able to stop the flames before they reach the village? Author Patricia Hruby Powell's retelling of this Navajo folktale is as graceful as it is compelling, and Kendrick Benally's bright, folk-inspired contemporary paintings are as magical as the mythical time the story describes. Enter the village of the First People . and become a part of the time when the world was new.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-In this traditional Navajo tale, a burning branch sets the mountaintop on fire, which threatens the village of the First People. First Woman asks the Bird People to help by carrying a jug of water, and, finally, a small gray bird agrees but ends up scorching her breast; she becomes Robin Redbreast. First Man asks the Insects and then the bear, lion, and wolf. All say no. First Woman asks the Water People-a snail, a beaver, an otter, and a muskrat. None will help, including Turtle. Finally, she discovers Frog. After soaking his spongelike coat with water, Crane carries him to the mountain to douse the fire, creating black mist on the north side of the mountain, blue mist on the south, white on the east, and yellow on the west. In gratitude, First Woman gives Crane the name "Rainbird" and Frog the power to "call the rain." This story, written in both English and Navajo, is vibrantly illustrated with neon-colored, folk-inspired art on vivid backgrounds.-Alexa Sandmann, Kent State University, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This is a delightful retelling from the Navajo tradition explaining how rain came to earth with the help of Crane and Frog. As a reward for their work they are given roles in nature that remain today. Thick glossy pages in vibrantly glowing colors echo the richness of the retelling. Each page includes the Navajo translation by Peter A. Thompson along with the English text. Disappointingly, on several pages, the white font sinks into the intensely painted double-page illustrations, making it difficult to read. Much more effective are the single-page illustrations with an adjoining white page sporting a clear black text. Still, this story, not easily found elsewhere, is a solid purchase for those libraries seeking to balance their folk literature collection with Native-American tales. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781893354081
Publisher:
Salina Bookshelf, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2006
Edition description:
Bilingual
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.69(w) x 9.49(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >