Cheaper by the Dozen

( 102 )

Overview

No growing pains have ever been more hilarious than those suffered loudly by the riotous Gilbreth clan. First, there are a dozen red-haired, freckle-faced kids to contend with. Then there's Dad, a famous efficiency expert who believes a family can be run just like a factory. And there's Mother, his partner in everything except discipline. How they all survive such escapades as forgetting Frank, Jr., in a roadside restaurant or going on a first date with Dad in the backseat or having their tonsils removed en masse...
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Overview

No growing pains have ever been more hilarious than those suffered loudly by the riotous Gilbreth clan. First, there are a dozen red-haired, freckle-faced kids to contend with. Then there's Dad, a famous efficiency expert who believes a family can be run just like a factory. And there's Mother, his partner in everything except discipline. How they all survive such escapades as forgetting Frank, Jr., in a roadside restaurant or going on a first date with Dad in the backseat or having their tonsils removed en masse will keep you in stitches. You can be sure they're not only cheaper, they're funnier by the dozen.

This heartwarming and hilarious family story finds thousands of new fans every year.

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Editorial Reviews

Saturday Review of Literature
“Always entertaining, occasionally hilarious, occasionally touching....Sound Americana.”
The Chicago Sun-Times
“Gay and lighthearted...One of the most amusing books.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060084608
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/28/2002
  • Series: Perennial Classics Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 59,033
  • Product dimensions: 7.98 (w) x 10.92 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. was born in 1911 in Plainfield, New Jersey, and graduated from the University of Michigan. He became a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy during World War II and received a Bronze Star and Air Medal. In 1947, he joined the staff of what is now the Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina. A columnist and reporter, he authored and coauthored several books, including Belles on Their Toes (with Ernestine Gilbreth Carey), How to Be a Father, and Time Out for Happiness. In 1950, he was corecipient (with his sister) of the French International Humor Award for Cheaper by the Dozen. He died in 2001.

Ernestine Gilbreth Carey was born in 1908 in New York City and graduated as an English major from Smith College. In 1930, soon after graduation, she began fourteen years of New York City department store buying and management. Meanwhile, she married and had two children. A writer and lecturer, she has authored and coauthored seven books, including Belles on Their Toes (with Frank Gilbreth Jr.), Jumping jupiter, Rings Around Us, and Giddy Moment. In 1950 she was corecipient (with her brother) of the French International Humor Award for Cheaper by the Dozen. She lives in Reedley, California.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One



Whistles and Shaving Bristles



Dad was a tall man, with a large head, jowls, and a Herbert Hoover collar. He was no longer slim; he had passed the two-hundred-pound mark during his early thirties, and left it so far behind that there were times when he had to resort to railway baggage scales to ascertain his displacement. But he carried himself with the self-assurance of a successful gentleman who was proud of his wife, proud of his family, and proud of his business accomplishments.

Dad had enough gall to be divided into three parts, and the ability and poise to backstop the front he placed before the world. He'd walk into a factory like the Zeiss works in Germany or the Pierce Arrow plant in this country and announce that he could speed up production by one-fourth. He'd do it, too.

One reason he had so many children -- there were twelve of us -- was that he was convinced anything he and Mother teamed up on was sure to be a success.

Dad always practiced what he preached, and it was just about impossible to tell where his scientific management company ended and his family life began. His office was always full of children, and he often took two or three of us, and sometimes all twelve, on business trips. Frequently, we'd tag along at his side, pencils and notebooks in our hands, when Dad toured a factory which had hired him as an efficiency expert.

On the other hand, our house at Montclair, New Jersey, was a sort of school for scientific management and the elimination of wasted motions -- or "motionstudy," as Dad and Mother named it.

Dad took moving pictures of us children washing dishes, so that he could figure out how we could reduce our motions and thus hurry through the task. Irregular jobs, such as painting the back porch or removing a stump from the front lawn, were awarded on a low-bid basis. Each child who wanted extra pocket money submitted a sealed bid saying what he would do the job for. The lowest bidder got the contract.

Dad installed process and work charts in the bathrooms. Every child old enough to write -- and Dad expected his offspring to start writing at a tender age -- was required to initial the charts in the morning after he had brushed his teeth, taken a bath, combed his hair, and made his bed. At night, each child had to weigh himself, plot the figure on a graph, and initial the process charts again after he had done his homework, washed his hands and face, and brushed his teeth. Mother wanted to have a place on the charts for saying prayers, but Dad said as far as he was concerned prayers were voluntary.

It was regimentation, all right. But bear in mind the trouble most parents have in getting just one child off to school, and multiply it by twelve. Some regimentation was necessary to prevent bedlam. Of course there were times when a child would initial the charts without actually having fulfilled the requirements. However, Dad had a gimlet eye and a terrible swift sword. The combined effect was that truth usually went marching on.

Yes, at home or on the job, Dad was always the efficiency expert. He buttoned his vest from the bottom up, instead of from the top down, because the bottom-to-top process took him only three seconds, while the top-to-bottom took seven. He even used two shaving brushes to lather his face, because he found that by so doing he could cut seventeen seconds off his shaving time. For a while he tried shaving with two razors, but he finally gave that up.

"I can save forty-four seconds," he grumbled, "but I wasted two minutes this morning putting this bandage on my throat."

It wasn't the slashed throat that really bothered him. It was the two minutes.

Some people used to say that Dad had so many children he couldn't keep track of them. Dad himself used to tell a story about one time when Mother went off to fill a lecture engagement and left him in charge at home. When Mother returned, she asked him if everything had run smoothly.

"Didn't have any trouble except with that one over there," he replied. "But a spanking brought him into line."

Mother could handle any crisis without losing her composure.

"That's not one of ours, dear," she said. "He belongs next door."

None of us remembers it, and maybe it never happened. Dad wasn't above stretching the truth, because there was nothing he liked better than a joke, particularly if it were on him and even more particularly if it were on Mother. This much is certain, though. There were two red-haired children who lived next door, and the Gilbreths all are blondes or redheads.

Although he was a strict taskmaster within his home, Dad tolerated no criticism of the family from outsiders. Once a neighbor complained that a Gilbreth had called the neighbor's boy a son of an unprintable word.

"What are the facts of the matter?" Dad asked blandly. And then walked away while the neighbor registered a double take.

But Dad hated unprintable words, and the fact that he had stood up for his son didn't prevent him from holding a full-dress court of inquiry once he got home, and administering the called-for punishment.

Dad was happiest in a crowd, especially a crowd of kids. Wherever he was, you'd see a string of them trailing him -- and the ones with plenty of freckles were pretty sure to be Gilbreths.

He had a way with children and knew how to keep them on their toes. He had a respect for them, too, and didn't mind showing it.

He believed that most adults stopped thinking the day they left school...

Cheaper by the Dozen. Copyright © by Frank B. Gilbreth. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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First Chapter

Cheaper by the Dozen

Chapter One



Whistles and Shaving Bristles



Dad was a tall man, with a large head, jowls, and a Herbert Hoover collar. He was no longer slim; he had passed the two-hundred-pound mark during his early thirties, and left it so far behind that there were times when he had to resort to railway baggage scales to ascertain his displacement. But he carried himself with the self-assurance of a successful gentleman who was proud of his wife, proud of his family, and proud of his business accomplishments.

Dad had enough gall to be divided into three parts, and the ability and poise to backstop the front he placed before the world. He'd walk into a factory like the Zeiss works in Germany or the Pierce Arrow plant in this country and announce that he could speed up production by one-fourth. He'd do it, too.

One reason he had so many children -- there were twelve of us -- was that he was convinced anything he and Mother teamed up on was sure to be a success.

Dad always practiced what he preached, and it was just about impossible to tell where his scientific management company ended and his family life began. His office was always full of children, and he often took two or three of us, and sometimes all twelve, on business trips. Frequently, we'd tag along at his side, pencils and notebooks in our hands, when Dad toured a factory which had hired him as an efficiency expert.

On the other hand, our house at Montclair, New Jersey, was a sort of school for scientific management and the elimination of wasted motions -- or "motion study," as Dad and Mother named it.

Dad took moving pictures of us children washing dishes, so that he could figure out how we could reduce our motions and thus hurry through the task. Irregular jobs, such as painting the back porch or removing a stump from the front lawn, were awarded on a low-bid basis. Each child who wanted extra pocket money submitted a sealed bid saying what he would do the job for. The lowest bidder got the contract.

Dad installed process and work charts in the bathrooms. Every child old enough to write -- and Dad expected his offspring to start writing at a tender age -- was required to initial the charts in the morning after he had brushed his teeth, taken a bath, combed his hair, and made his bed. At night, each child had to weigh himself, plot the figure on a graph, and initial the process charts again after he had done his homework, washed his hands and face, and brushed his teeth. Mother wanted to have a place on the charts for saying prayers, but Dad said as far as he was concerned prayers were voluntary.

It was regimentation, all right. But bear in mind the trouble most parents have in getting just one child off to school, and multiply it by twelve. Some regimentation was necessary to prevent bedlam. Of course there were times when a child would initial the charts without actually having fulfilled the requirements. However, Dad had a gimlet eye and a terrible swift sword. The combined effect was that truth usually went marching on.

Yes, at home or on the job, Dad was always the efficiency expert. He buttoned his vest from the bottom up, instead of from the top down, because the bottom-to-top process took him only three seconds, while the top-to-bottom took seven. He even used two shaving brushes to lather his face, because he found that by so doing he could cut seventeen seconds off his shaving time. For a while he tried shaving with two razors, but he finally gave that up.

"I can save forty-four seconds," he grumbled, "but I wasted two minutes this morning putting this bandage on my throat."

It wasn't the slashed throat that really bothered him. It was the two minutes.

Some people used to say that Dad had so many children he couldn't keep track of them. Dad himself used to tell a story about one time when Mother went off to fill a lecture engagement and left him in charge at home. When Mother returned, she asked him if everything had run smoothly.

"Didn't have any trouble except with that one over there," he replied. "But a spanking brought him into line."

Mother could handle any crisis without losing her composure.

"That's not one of ours, dear," she said. "He belongs next door."

None of us remembers it, and maybe it never happened. Dad wasn't above stretching the truth, because there was nothing he liked better than a joke, particularly if it were on him and even more particularly if it were on Mother. This much is certain, though. There were two red-haired children who lived next door, and the Gilbreths all are blondes or redheads.

Although he was a strict taskmaster within his home, Dad tolerated no criticism of the family from outsiders. Once a neighbor complained that a Gilbreth had called the neighbor's boy a son of an unprintable word.

"What are the facts of the matter?" Dad asked blandly. And then walked away while the neighbor registered a double take.

But Dad hated unprintable words, and the fact that he had stood up for his son didn't prevent him from holding a full-dress court of inquiry once he got home, and administering the called-for punishment.

Dad was happiest in a crowd, especially a crowd of kids. Wherever he was, you'd see a string of them trailing him -- and the ones with plenty of freckles were pretty sure to be Gilbreths.

He had a way with children and knew how to keep them on their toes. He had a respect for them, too, and didn't mind showing it.

He believed that most adults stopped thinking the day they left school...

Cheaper by the Dozen. Copyright © by Frank B. Gilbreth. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 102 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(50)

4 Star

(30)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 102 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 11, 2012

    The book was overall pretty good. I thought the message it was s

    The book was overall pretty good. I thought the message it was sending was very important. It was reminded that family is very important, and that everyone should always stick together. The book describes a family and their adventures, as the title suggests, the parents Frank and Lilly Gilbreth do have twelve children! Always keeping them busy! I didn't like the book as much because it was very slow at times and I felt it dragged on a bit. I did enjoy reading about some of the adventures they took and how the parents would handle the kids when they did something wrong. Mr. Gilbreth was very strict at times but he knew how to care for a family. Although Mr. Gilbreth was very strict at times, he was teaching his kids great lessons, and as time went on he began to learn from the kids as much as they were learning from him. I strongly believe that family is the most important thing and this book portrays this perfectly! As I picked out the book to read I thought it was going to be better than what it was, I felt it was kind of slow sometimes, it wasn't as good as I had hoped. I would still recommend it to anybody it teaches a good lesson without being very boring.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 5, 2010

    Highly Recommended!

    Cheaper by the Dozen is the story of the Frank Gilbreth Children. It is heartwarming and funny! Much much better than the newer movie! They don't come close!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 19, 2014

    If you haven't read this classic, you have missed out on a real

    If you haven't read this classic, you have missed out on a real gem. Being published in E Book form, you should rectify this error as it is an easy Click. 




    I have read it at least a dozen times starting in my middle school years. 




    This memoir has every thing, its a family drama and comedy, historical fiction of the World War 1,  and women's rights reflections. 




    Since I mainly review romances of note is the love story  between Mother and Father, and the young love of the oldest childern. 




    Engrossing and captivating. A good read for all ages. 




    I was given this book for my honest review. So, there you have it. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    Meh

    The reason why im reading this book is because my woodshop teacher said i would get extra credit. I seriously cant stand him but I'll take the credit. Judging by the negative comments, this book reflects my teacher. Slow, boring, dull.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2013

    I saw the movie and it was hilarious!

    I saw the movie and it was hilarious!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. and Ernestine Gil

    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey is about a family of fourteen, twelve children and the mother and father, living in the 1900’s. The Gilbreth family has just moved to a new home and they are adjusting while also working with their father to become more efficient. This of course is what the father strives to do, make everything more efficient he even has a whistle which he blows and the family has to evacuate the home as quick as possible. The major message of this book would be to have a strong, close family. This is presented in the book by the mother and children always supporting their father and her husband. I like this book because it is written like a diary which it almost is considering it was written by two of the children of this family. I wouldn’t recommend this book because it is very exciting. It’s not a fantastic book and it’s not a horrible book it is about in the middle I would say 3/5 stars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    One of the Most Enjoyable Books I¿ve Ever Read Cheaper by the D

    One of the Most Enjoyable Books I’ve Ever Read

    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank Gilbreth was a wonderful book that taught many important lessons. Although growing up in a large family has its disadvantages, it also gives the children a different perspective on their childhood and how they live the rest of their lives. The book shows how the family relies on each other through their own struggles, sticking up for each other, getting along, etc. Most importantly, the book shows how the father of the family tied them all together when the children were growing up. He took good care of his wife and children; he feed them, educated his children, and kept the family together. The family-like image makes the book enjoyable and creative, looking at the different outlook of how large families grew up. It is fascinating how the father’s presence ties the whole family together, yet his care and love is rarely shown affectionately. Though the stories told by the children dragged, they were entertaining to read, even for the early twentieth century. I would recommend this book for anyone who would like to read a light book about a caring, loving family adapting to living in such a huge family. It was an entertaining, humorous book that was a great read. I would most definitely read it again. Overall, I would rate it 4 ½ stars. It was very informative and amusing!

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    Enjoyable and Heart Warming, Tumultuous yet Organized...Overall

    Enjoyable and Heart Warming, Tumultuous yet Organized...Overall Great Read!
    Family is one of the best things one can offer. It is unique and similar at the same time. It is one where everyone is loved for who they are. The book Cheaper by the Dozen is a fantastic book! It is written by Frank B. Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey. In the book Frank and Lily decide to have a huge family. The book describes all about their adventures and challenges as a family of 12. The family has exceptional discipline but also has many enjoyable moments in each others lives. It shows how a family can come together to overcome struggles such as any other normal family would have to. With the simplest things like breakfast or packing lunches. While the family is like others they also have their differences such as their whistle system (when frank blows the whistle they all line up from oldest to youngest). I would recommend this book any day to anyone, but most definitely to family oriented people around ages 14-20. Along with that the book is very relatable due all the different personalities of each single kid, and how nice the family is. This book also has its moments of joy and sorrow. With Frank dying when his youngest child was only two yet the family has its funny moments such making hilarious jokes about their aunt Anne. In the end this is an outstanding book of a family of 14 growing up, which provides amazing life lessons. All the while an extremely heartwarming book!!

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    A Very Entertaining and Informative Story about Life with 12 Children

    Cheaper by the Dozen, by Frank Gilbreth Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey, is an enthralling story about how a family with twelve children can function smoothly. Written by two of the older children, Frank Jr. and Ernestine, Cheaper by the Dozen is a compilation of the several short entertaining stories. Each chapter depicted a different episode, generally including the father and the twelve children. For example, one of the chapters is called The Rena, and is all about the adventures the family would have on their boat Rena. Although most of the chapters did not connect directly, the stories were written in chronological order and did have small ties between each other.
    Because Cheaper by the Dozen was not a complete story, but more of a collection of stories, there were very few messages and themes. However, it was very evident in every chapter that a connected family was very important to the Gilbreths. In every one of the sections, either all of the children were included, or it was just Frank and Lillian, the parents. Due to this common aspect, the importance of family to the Gilbreths was very obvious.
    One of the aspects that made Cheaper by the Dozen so enjoyable was the fact that it was so lighthearted throughout the entire book. Because of this, reading was both entertaining and informative about the life of the Gilbreths. Additionally, the structure of the writing made it easy to read and it was not a "hassle" just to get through each chapter. Instead, every chapter was just the right length and kept the reader eager to read the next chapter after one finished. Conversely, I disliked the sudden ending to the story, finishing with the father's death. However, because this was a nonfiction piece, this ending was unavoidable.
    If a reader is looking for a light, and entertaining, yet informative novel, Cheaper by the Dozen would be a great choice to read. However, it is more of an entertaining nonfiction story rather than a factual story, so if a reader was looking more for specific information of Frank Gilbreth Sr. or any of the other family, this would not be the best choice.
    In general, I was very glad that I chose to read Cheaper by the Dozen due to the entertaining nature of the book. Overall, I would rate this nonfiction story an eight out of ten.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2012

    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. and Ernestine Gilb

    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey is a fun, lovable book with lots of quirky charm spread throughout. It’s fun humor is good for any age and it has an amazing message on the necessity of a close bond between families and how it is not money that truly makes a person happy but their loved ones that surround them through thick and thin. I absolutely loved how Mr. Gilbreth when driving through town would pretend he was carting a circus or an orphanage or some such thing and people believed him!! Kind of reminds me of my dad, but I don’t know maybe all dad’s have their own twisted way of showing affection or joking around. This book also has an underlying theme of family loyalty which is shown when the kids offer to change their plans for the future in order to keep the family together and help out when something bad happens. That particular part of the book flourishes a willingness to sacrifice much for the sake of others that is not often seen as much in today’s society. Due to that, I believe this book deserves a 5 star rating and much applause for being a well written and thought out thrill ride!

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    Great book to read, very enjoyable! Cheaper by the Dozen is abou

    Great book to read, very enjoyable!
    Cheaper by the Dozen is about a couple named Frank and Lilly Gilbreth, whom together have twelve children! They had six boys and six girls and no shortage of things to do! Frank was a very strict parent and thought efficiency was everything. Nothing was worse than wasting time, so he had his children in tip-top shape. The kids worked like a factory in all that they did, such as cleaning the dishes or painting the back porch. Lilly was much less strict than Frank and easier going. Not everything always happens the way it’s supposed to in this book, however the Gilbreth’s are constantly finding a way to get through it and have fun while doing it. The book shows a great deal of family value that most families could only dream of having. Having twelve kids one might think it’d be hard spend a lot of time together as a family and go on trips, nonetheless Frank and Lilly managed to take their children on trips quite frequently! I enjoyed reading this book because it gave the reader the feeling that the more kids there were the more love there was to go around, through all of the shenanigans no one is forgotten. Frank and Lilly know that anything they did together would be a success, so no matter what they persevered through the harder times to get to the better ones! I thought the book wasn't as good as the movie, but it was still pretty funny and entertaining to read. It’s a good family oriented, witty book that most people looking for a nice read would enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    The Intriguing Tales of the Gilbreth 12 Frank and Lily Gilbreth

    The Intriguing Tales of the Gilbreth 12
    Frank and Lily Gilbreth are parents with a rag tag gang of 12 kids who have a knack for finding trouble. Although they have 12 kids, which can be a hassle at times, the motion-study expert and psychiatrist have worked together as an unlikely duo and have raised them well. The fantastic duo have worked together to teach the children to line up at the sound of whistle and how to excel in school and at many other things. While neither parent in a teacher they work together to teach the children the touch system, how to multiply large numbers, and Morse code. With this family many things don’t go as planned. The mistake with the houses as they are moving to Montclair, or the time in the Foolish Carriage where a woman thinks they are an orphanage. Although parts of the book are boring, the tales of the Gilbreth 12 and the many adventures they had were great and entertaining, such as the gaggle of children getting all of their tonsils out at once, or the exaggerations such as burying a coffin of pencils for their father. Although the large family of fourteen often got frustrated with each other, as would any normal family, they know that they will always love each other in the end, and everything that happened was for their own good. They had been with each other through thick and thin, whether it was scaring off boys, needing a shoulder to cry on, or even needing someone to go against dad, the family was there to lean on like any old family. A truly heartwarming and family centered book, a good read and definitely something to recommend to a friend, a five star book worth the time to read.

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  • Posted September 9, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Very Heartwarming and a Great Read! Cheaper by the Dozen by Fran

    Very Heartwarming and a Great Read!
    Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B Gilbreth, Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey is an amazing book about the lifestyle of a family with a dozen children. Not only was it interesting to gain insight into a world very few will ever know, but it was wonderful to read such a happy, lighthearted family story. I personally come from a family with four kids, and I have four cousins very close to my age. I love when we get together, and I love being a part of a big family with a lot of kids. This is why Cheaper by the Dozen intrigued me so much. In big families, there are bound to be heaps of good times and memories together, and this book shows just that. I especially loved reading Chapter 13 entitled, ‘Have You Seen The Latest Model?’ because I enjoyed the way their father dealt with his children when they were very young, and how each one of them was born and in what order. Also adding to the story is its time setting. The early 1900s seem like a time of adventure and innocence. The family’s drives in their car and their trips to Nantucket depict both these things, as driving was such a new and exciting thing to experience in this time. As the oldest girls begin to date, we see the innocence dating was back then, which gives an added lightheartedness to the story. Overall, Cheaper by the Dozen is a great family story and I recommend it to all who want to enjoy a good book.

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  • Posted September 9, 2012

    Great book but a tad slow moving! This book is about a couple, L

    Great book but a tad slow moving! This book is about a couple, Lilly and Frank Gilbreth, who have big plans for a family. Frank, wanted to have a huge family and Lilly was all for that! So they decided that the wanted to have 12 kids, 6 boys, and 6 girls to make it equal. Frank is a very strict father and he expects a lot out of all his kids, such as he teaches them to line up from oldest to youngest at the sound of a whistle when they have company over. He is always looking for the most efficient way to do anything and he believes his family should be run like a factory. He has also set up a very strict discipline system and he does not allow any shenanigans! Lilly, the mom, on the other hand is very calm and collected and is always looking to make her kids happy and she is not the major discipline parent. In the novel, they go on many family trips and one of them consisted of going to a lake house. They arrive and it’s an old beat up house that they weren’t expecting, but as they walk around they realize this is not the one! So when they finally find it the kids are thrilled because it ends up being pretty nice. Nothing they do ever turns out as planned whether its taking a family picture or getting all the kid’s tonsils removed together. I really liked how the book was funny, but I disliked how slow moving it was, and how close you had to pay attention to detail just to get the full story. I think older people would enjoy this book because its old and it has large words and material that they would get a hoot out of. I would rate this story a 3 out of 5 stars because it was a very good book and it made me laugh, but not a full 5 because it put me to sleep at parts. Read the book though, it’s a great experience!

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  • Posted September 9, 2012

    A great read! Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank Gilbreth, teaches a

    A great read! Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank Gilbreth, teaches a major lesson and theme that everyone should be familiar with. Family is the most important thing in a persons life. Family is the best gift life can give to a person. This book is a perfect example of the well known saying, "Home is where the heart is." Its the place for all love, safety and growing. The book was a great example of a real life family because well, it based on the life of a real family. It gave me somewhat of a comfort as i read it because it made me realize how the Gilbreth family is just like any other ordinary family, with the exception of twelve kids. Each member of their family goes through thick and thin, as we all do. But they always manage to keep a smile on their face. The Gilbreth children had two great parents that knew exactly what they wanted for their kids, by teaching them a series of lessons.They were taught to never give up and to always work with each other and treat each other well. They learned quite well that it was useful to work as a team in order to get things done easily and more efficiently. I enjoyed the fact that it wasn't just a realistic book that i could relate to but it was humorous! You can never laugh too much! The humorous side to the book was what made it fun and easy to read unlike those books that are mainly serious or boring with one or two funny parts. I would definitely recommend this book because of its good morals, lessons, humor and ability to relate to any one who reads it.




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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    The Gilbreth¿s are Insane!!! Put this book on your list! This bo

    The Gilbreth’s are Insane!!! Put this book on your list!
    This book is about a family with eleven kids, they’re known as a family of a dozen however when she was little the second eldest daughter died, this isn’t mentioned much in the book so I had to look her up. Mr. Gilbreth is controlling and protective, Mrs. Gilbreth is kind and caring and all of their children are hyper and take care of one another. This book is great because it’s so hilarious and adorable, they all get into mischeif and mayhem and cause others to move. My personal favorite character is Mr. Gilbreth, he loves to pass out jokes and doesn’t always take them very well at first. He’s an amazing teacher and all of his kids are at least one grade ahead. This family does everything at top speed and they learn that way too. If you’re looking for a good cute laugh and a quick, easy read I’d recommend this book for you.
    ~ Alanna Brock

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    A Fun Read and For People of All Ages! 12 kids?!?! Ev

    A Fun Read and For People of All Ages!

    12 kids?!?! Even with 6 in my own family it was fun to read about how the Gilbrith family does it with their 12 red-headed and freckly (as well as rambunctious) children! On every page there was a funny story or one that I could relate to. Between their car that acts up and the children who watch their dad take his tonsils out without medication, the Gilbrith family is one that never stops going.
    A first the book was a little slow, but read between the lines and you can see the family love and connection through all these little experiences. Since the book is written by two of the Gilbrith kids, the insight and first hand experiences are what really makes this a memorable story. When tragedy strikes the family, the pain is definitely defined in the way the authors wrote. Even with this part in the book I still enjoyed the book and had even a greater appreciation for it.
    In the end, this is a joyful story of classical family life and how family is just what you need to make everything right again.

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  • Posted September 6, 2012

    Fun to read! Cheaper by The Dozen is a great family based book.

    Fun to read! Cheaper by The Dozen is a great family based book. It is about a family and how they get through challenges that most people would think is impossible to do. For example the whistle system that the father set up, whenever the father blows the whistle the children are to line up. It is such an amazing system because the children get down to their father so quickly, and the children make some sort of a game by seeing how long it takes them. The book explains how the large family gets through many struggles that any normal family has and how they come up with such unique ways to overcome those struggles. Cheaper by The Dozen is very heart warming by how even though there are twelve children in the family the parents see a very unique difference in every child by how they act and what talents they have such as Ernestine who is the fastest typist in the family. I highly recommend this book to any person that is family oriented and a people person.

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  • Posted September 6, 2012

    Fantastic! I was skeptical having to read this book for school b

    Fantastic!
    I was skeptical having to read this book for school but Cheaper by the Dozen really has it all. At points I laughed, cried, and everything in between. The story focuses on the Gilbreths, a family of fourteen, and the adventures they have together. Although this book is filled with gut-busting hilarity and chaos, it deals with some of the more serious issues of growing up (dating, driving, puberty, etc). I strongly recommend this book for all ages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Such an Amazing Way to Live! In Cheaper by the dozen, focus is

    Such an Amazing Way to Live!

    In Cheaper by the dozen, focus is all on a family with, you guessed it, twelve kids! The book takes you through major pieces in this family's life and focuses mostly on the dad. Dad does lots of very interesting things to get his children to learn. He painted morse code on the walls of bedrooms and bathrooms, he taught them how to type on a type writer by blocking out letters on the keyboard, and other things that no other family would do. Also, when all of his children came down with measles, he pretended he had them too, just so he could come visit them. Because he is an efficiency expert, he believed he could run his family like a factory. He would do things in such a way just so he could shave even a few seconds off of what he had to do. He knew how to get children to be better people and have fun, too. Dad shows everyone how important family is and how parents have the responsibility of holding everyone together. He shows how great it is when families are together and how important family bonds are.

    I loved reading this book because I was so caught up in all of these character's lives and wondering what they would do next. Sometimes it was hard for me to remember that these were real people (the book is non-fiction!) and realize how awesome it would have been to live with them. It is a great book if you want some humor in what you read. I would recommend this book for pretty much everyone to read, and for any age. It is very humorous and made me take a step back and make sure I was trying to have fun while being a good person. I would honestly catch myself grinning while I was reading this. A truly great story to read over and over again!

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