Chef on a Shoestring: More Than 120 Inexpensive Recipes for Great Meals from America's Best-Known Chefs

Overview

Cooking great meals doesn't require spending a fortune on ingredients. Each week on the CBS Saturday Early Show, a prominent chef is given twenty dollars to create a three-course meal for four. Chef on a Shoestring collects the best of those culinary delights to benefit Share Our Strength, one of the nation's leading anti-hunger, anti-poverty organizations. These recipes, created by some of the most celebrated chefs in the country, may have been produced on a budget but are rich...
See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$16.37
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$17.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $12.34   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Cooking great meals doesn't require spending a fortune on ingredients. Each week on the CBS Saturday Early Show, a prominent chef is given twenty dollars to create a three-course meal for four. Chef on a Shoestring collects the best of those culinary delights to benefit Share Our Strength, one of the nation's leading anti-hunger, anti-poverty organizations. These recipes, created by some of the most celebrated chefs in the country, may have been produced on a budget but are rich in every other way.

The recipes are organized into convenient categories, such as Finger Foods and Small Plates, Salads, Pasta and Risotto, Poultry, Meats, and Desserts, to allow you to mix and match various courses from different chefs. You can begin a meal with Salmon Corn Cakes from Walter Staib of Philadelphia's historic City Tavern, serve Seared Chicken Breast with Red Onion Vinaigrette from Charlie Palmer of Aureole on New York as your main course, and finish with Beacon restaurant's Waldy Malouf's Best Chocolate Chip Cookies. Or try the Asparagus and Bean Sprout Salad with Dill Pesto from Aquavit's Marcus Samuelsson, Tom Douglas' Crispy Fried Snapper with Chili Ponzu, and Coconut Rice Pudding with Fresh Mango from John Villa. Spice up your favorite burger or grilled chicken with Barbecued Onions from John Schenk of Clementine, and from '21' try Erik Blauberg's Baby Arugula Greens with Watermelon "croutons" and Caesar Dressing, to jump-start a weeknight dinner.

With advice on stocking your pantry, buying in season, shopping on a budget, and avoiding the temptation to be too frugal, Chef on A Shoestring is a unique culinary adventure for taste-conscious, budget-conscious home cooks.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Dwight Garner
This book provides good recipes from Mario Batali, Eric Ripert, Alfred Portale and many others, along with canny advice on how to feed three courses to four people for under $30. Another reason to feel good: royalties go to the anti-hunger charity Share Our Strength.
The New York Times
Library Journal
"Chef on a Shoestring" is one of the most popular segments on CBS's Saturday Early Show. It features a well-known chef (generally but not exclusively from New York City), who is given $20 to buy all the necessary ingredients and then prepares a three-course meal for a family of four. Here, favorite recipes from the show are organized by courses of the meal, which makes the book easy to use, but it would be interesting to see how the dishes balanced each other in the specific menu (i.e., a few seem like "splurges" and must have been balanced by other courses that cost very little). Expect demand. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743211437
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 5/4/2004
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 0.54 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 9.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Friedman has made a career of getting to know the heads and hearts of professional cooks and athletes. For more than ten years, Friedman has collaborated with many of the nation’s best and most revered chefs on cookbooks and other writing projects. His writing career began in 1997, when Alfred Portale, asked him to collaborate on the Gotham Bar and Grill Cookbook. The book received wide acclaim and since then he has worked as a cookbook collaborator on more than twenty projects, helping a number of the nation’s best chefs (Alfred Portale, David Waltuck, Tom Valenti, and many others) share their unique culinary viewpoints with readers. As coauthor of the New York Times bestseller Breaking Back, the memoir of American tennis star James Blake, he took readers inside an athlete’s mind during training and competition, and he does the same as a frequent contributor to Tennis Magazine. In KNIVES AT DAWN: The American Team and the Bocuse d’Or 2009, Friedman combines these two personal passions to tell the story of the premier cooking competition in the world. Friedman has contributed articles to O—The Oprah Magazine and other publications and websites. He has been profiled in The New York Daily News and New York Magazine, and interviewed for, or featured in articles in, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, as well as on NPR’s Taste of the Nation and WOR Radio’s Food Talk. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Columbia University, and is a graduate of the French Culinary Institute’s “La Technique” cooking program. He lives in New York City with his family.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Mario Batali's Mushroom and White Bean Bruschetta
Serves 4
Mario Batali is the ponytailed chef-proprietor (chef-general might be more accurate) behind a growing New York City restaurant empire that includes Po, Babbo, and Lupa, with plans to culinarily conquer additional neighborhoods as well. Discussing his recipes, he exudes such effortless charisma, charm, and smarts that one gets the impression that if he hadn't discovered chefdom, he might have become the hippest history professor on the planet. Ask him about an Italian dish, and without a moment's hesitation, he fires off a historical and geographic context that adds intellectual interest to the most deceptively simple composition of ingredients. He even makes bruschetta beguiling, explaining that the name derives from the Italian word buscare, or "to cook over open coals," and refers to the toasted bread that forms the base of this starter.
This bruschetta evokes the white bean version Batali offers up at many of his outposts in New York. Among its attributes are that it may be reproduced over and over again with great consistency, a crucial quality in a restaurant dish and not a bad thing at home either.
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
10 ounces cremini mushrooms, trimmed, wiped clean with a damp cloth or paper towel, TK
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1/2 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons thinly sliced basil leaves
1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 16-ounce can cannellini beans
8 1-inch-thick slices Italian peasant bread, toasted in the oven (preferably while cooking the mushrooms)

In a medium sauté pan, warm 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over moderate heat. Add the mushrooms to the pan and sauté for about 2 minutes until wilted.
In a mixing bowl, gently stir together the cooked mushrooms, remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, the balsamic vinegar, red pepper flakes, basil, and garlic. Season lightly with salt and pepper.
Drain the water from the beans and gently mix them with the mushrooms. Arrange 2 warm toast slices on each plate. Divide the mushroom mixture evenly among the slices and serve.
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Terrance Brennan's Pear and Gorgonzola Salad
Serves 4
In this salad from Picholine chef Terrance Brennan the succulent sweetness of pears contrasts with the creamy richness of Gorgonzola cheese. Rather than using mesclun greens, Brennan plays this combination against the slightly bitter flavor of crisp watercress.
2 ripe Bartlett pears
1 lemon (optional)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
8 ounces Gorgonzola or goat's milk cheese, at room temperature, cut into 4 same-shape wedges
2 bunches watercress, tough stems trimmed and discarded, washed and dried
16 walnut halves, coarsely chopped and lightly toasted

Cut the pears in half and remove the cores and stems with a melon baller. Cut off a thin slice of the round part of each pear half so it will sit flat on a plate. Set aside. (If not serving immediately, rub all cut surfaces of the pears with lemon juice to keep it from oxidizing and turning brown.)
Whisk the olive oil into the vinegar. Season with salt and freshly cracked black pepper.
Set a pear half in the center of each salad plate. Lean 1 cheese wedge against each pear half or stack it on top of the pear. Drizzle a total of 2 tablespoons of the vinaigrette evenly over the pears. Toss the watercress with the remaining vinaigrette and mound it on top of the pears, being careful not to topple the cheese. Sprinkle with the walnut pieces and season with salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste.
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Bobby Flay's Saffron Risotto with Sautéed Shrimp
Serves 6 as an appetizer or 4 as a main course
"I make my risotto exactly opposite of the way the great Italian chefs do," says Bobby Flay, who adds stock to his rice in three or four large installments, rather than in smaller ladlefuls. The result is a creamier-than-average risotto with a firm al dente core at the center of each grain. And how did Mr. Flay hit upon this technique? "It's called 'I'm-from-New-York-City-and-I don't-have-time-to-wait,'" he says.
5 cups lobster or shrimp stock
5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 medium Spanish onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 cups dry white wine
2 cups Arborio rice
1 tablespoon saffron threads
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh tarragon leaves
Coarse salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
12 large shrimp, shelled and deveined

Bring the stock to a simmer in a saucepan.
In a large saucepan, heat 3 tablespoons of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sweat until soft but not colored, 3 to 4 minutes. Raise the heat to high and add the wine. Cook, stirring constantly, until the wine reduces and the pan is almost dry. Reduce the heat to medium, add the rice and saffron, and stir until the rice is well coated, approximately 2 minutes.
Add 1 1/2 cups of the stock to the rice and cook, stirring continuously, until the liquid is absorbed. Repeat with a second cup, stirring until the additional stock has been absorbed. Continue to add stock in 1 cup increments, cooking and stirring until it is absorbed and the rice is plump but still a bit al dente. Add the honey and the tarragon and season to taste with salt and pepper.
Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large sauté pan over high heat. Season the shrimp with salt and pepper to taste. Sauté 2 to 3 minutes on each side.
Spoon the risotto into a large serving bowl. Arrange the shrimp over the risotto and serve immediately.
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Charlie Palmer's Seared Chicken Breast with Red Onion Vinaigrette
Serves 4
The tangy red onion vinaigrette that dresses the chicken in this recipe will haunt your taste buds. When cooking the chicken, be sure to get the pan very hot before adding the chicken to it.
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup finely diced red onion
1 teaspoon dried thyme
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 cups canned unsalted chicken broth, defatted
3/4 cup red Burgundy
3 plum tomatoes, seeded, peeled, and cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 sachet
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 whole boneless chicken breasts, skin on
1 tablespoon coarsely cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon corn oil

Place 1 tablespoon olive oil in a small sauté pan and warm over moderate heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion to the pan and sauté for 10 minutes until the onion is well browned and caramelized. Stir in the thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Sachet
Using a sachet is a convenient way of infusing a liquid with herbaceous flavor while facilitating the removal of the herbs at the end of the cooking process. You may vary the contents of a sachet in other recipes to suit your own taste.
1 bunch parsley stems about the width of your little finger
10 peppercorns
1 teaspoon dried thyme
2 bay leaves
Tie all ingredients in a cheesecloth bag.

Combine the broth, wine, tomatoes, garlic, and sachet in a medium saucepan and set over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for about 25 minutes until the liquid is reduced to 3/4 cup. Remove from the heat, discard the sachet, and pour the liquid into a heatproof bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Alternately whisk in 1/2 cup olive oil and the vinegar until just emulsified. Stir in the caramelized onion. Keep warm in the top half of a double boiler set over simmering water until ready to serve.
Preheat the oven to 375° F.
Split the chicken breasts in half and trim. Generously season with salt to taste and the cracked pepper. Heat the corn oil in a large, ovenproof sauté pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add the chicken breasts, skin side down, to the pan. Cook for 5 minutes until golden brown. Turn the breasts and transfer the pan to the preheated oven. Roast for 8 to 10 minutes until cooked through and golden brown. Remove from the oven and place on a stovetop burner over low heat. Add the vinaigrette to the pan and baste to coat. When the chicken is well coated, serve the chicken with the vinaigrette spooned on top.
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Erica Miller's Chocolate Banana Terrine
Serves 4
The ingredients for this simple dessert say it all -- heavy cream, semisweet chocolate, and bananas -- plenty of ammunition for a potent and simple confection. It may, of course, be made with other fruits. Try those you enjoy dipping in chocolate, such as strawberries, orange sections, or cherries.
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup very finely chopped semisweet chocolate
2 ripe bananas
Special equipment: 1 terrine mold, or 4 6-ounce ramekins, greased with butter or Pam and lined with sugar and refrigerated for at least 1 hour

In a small saucepot, bring the cream to boil. Stir in the chocolate until well incorporated; it will melt very quickly. Remove from the heat immediately and cover to keep warm.
Peel the bananas and place whole in the terrine mold or cut them in half and place a half in each of the ramekins. Pour the chocolate mixture over the bananas. Allow to cool to room temperature, then refrigerate for 1 hour.
To serve, unmold the terrine and cut into 4 equal slices or unmold the ramekins onto chilled plates.
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Foreword
In the hours before sunrise on Saturday mornings, midtown Manhattan is a dark and desolate place. If you walked the streets at 5 A.M., you might wonder whether New York really deserved the nickname "the city that never sleeps." But there are signs of life even in these wee hours -- a few errant cab drivers, deli-counter people, regally attired doormen, and the crew of the CBS News program that I've been producing since 1997.
All television shows evolve over the years and ours is no exception; we've even changed the title from the original CBS News Saturday Morning to The Saturday Early Show. But there's one component of the program that's been a constant since the first morning we took to the airwaves -- the weekly segment called "Chef on a Shoestring" on which we invite a well-known restaurant chef or food personality to prepare a three-course meal for four on a budget of just $20.
The concept for Chef on a Shoestring grew organically from our formative days of a show on a shoestring; when the broadcast was first conceived, we were short on money, personnel, and time. It seems amazing in hindsight, but we had just two and one-half months to pull the whole thing together.
Cooking segments are an unofficial prerequisite for weekend morning shows, and when it came time to devise ours, I found myself taking a self-pitying view of my own understaffed and time-starved circumstances. But then a delicious idea hit me -- put a chef in similar straits and see what happens. "Chef on a Shoestring," I whispered to myself, and the segment was on its way.
Of course, I didn't want just any chefs. I wanted the best chefs the city -- and the country -- had to offer. And their response was gratifying. Most of the chefs have appeared on other shows and in numerous print articles and, of course, they create food in the country's best restaurants. But this was a new challenge for them -- one as it turned out they were eager to meet.
At our next staff meeting, I ran the "Chef on a Shoestring" concept by the staff hoping that a producer would want to take it on. A young associate named Kelly Buzby modestly offered to "give it a shot." Well, her first shot ended up setting the tone for what today, three years later, remains the model every Saturday segment. For our fast-approaching first week, Kelly lined up Michael Lomonaco, who ran the kitchen at the '21' Club and now has a show (Epicurious) on the Discovery Channel and is at Windows on the World. This was the first real test. We gave Michael just $20 and sent him to the Union Square Greenmarket to purchase the ingredients as our camera watched. This shopping trip became the signature opening of "Chef on a Shoestring." (I have to point out that the segment is currently produced by the equally talented Jee Park.)
For our debut on September 13, 1997, Michael demonstrated how to make Tomato and Basil Salad and Chicken Fricassee; he served apples and cheese for dessert. At the end of the show, our cohost Russ Mitchell invited viewers to write in for the recipe. The following week, we got our first inkling of how popular this segment would be as bag after bag of mail came pouring in. Our staff and interns gradually worked their way through the piles, sending printed recipes to viewers around the country. It was a phenomenon that grew every week, and continues to grow today. Eventually we began posting the recipes on our Web site, but -- even though we get 20,000 hits per week -- the letters continue to pour in. And we love it.
The "Chef on a Shoestring" TV segment reflects the times in which we live and, by extension, the times in which we cook. Though the economy (at least at the time of this writing) is booming, I still think that people generally feel on the losing end of things. We all seem to have less and less free time, and sometimes we feel we're getting less for our money, whether it's in diminished service or the quantity and quality of the goods we buy. When the chef of an upscale restaurant shows up on our program, shopping in a regular supermarket or grocery store and then preparing uncommonly accessible recipes, it offers a very comforting and affordable view of the world and delivers something that is too often lacking in our lives today: value.
Thanks to this segment, we've been privileged to meet and work with some of the most respected chefs in the country. They have graciously donated their time, creativity, and personality to our show. The budget may be on a shoestring, but our chefs have done everything to ensure that the recipes in this book are rich in every other way.
Hal Gessner
Executive Producer
The Saturday Early Show
April 2000, New York City
Copyright © 2001 by CBS Worldwide
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword

A Message from Share Our Strength

Introduction

How to Use This Book

FINGER FOODS AND SMALL PLATES

Mario Batali's Mushroom and White Bean Bruschetta ~ Walter Staib's Salmon Corn Cake ~ Eric Ripert's Stuffed Tomatoes ~ Amanda Hesser's Creamy Leeks and Tarragon on Toast ~ John Schenk's Buffalo Chicken Wings ~ John Schenk's Clementine Cheese Fondue with Toasted Baguette ~ Don Pintabona's Prosciutto-Wrapped Figs with Smoked Mozzarella ~ Don Pintabona's Caramelized Onion, Gorgonzola, and Rosemary Pizza ~ Erica Miller's Tuna Carpaccio ~ Richard Sandoval's Mahi Mahi Ceviche ~ Richard Krause's Grilled Mozzarella and Tomato ~ Mario Batali's Marinated Roasted Peppers with Goat Cheese, Olives, and Fett'unta ~ Jeanette Maier's Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms ~ Peter Kelly's Roasted Onion with Bacon and Apple Stuffing ~ Thomas Salamunovich's Smoked Salmon with Crisp Onion Rings, Grilled Asparagus, and Pea Shoots ~ Alfred Portale's Creamy Polenta with Cremini Mushrooms ~ Sara Moulton's Quiche Lorriane

SALADS

Erik Blauberg's Baby Arugula Greens with Watermelon Croutons and Caesar Dressing ~ John Schenk's Classic Ceasar Salad ~ Aaron Bashy's Braised Leek Salad ~ Walter Staib's Cucumber and Cream Salad ~ Bill Wavrin's Spinach and Red Onion Salad ~ Ira Freehof's Hearts of Lettuce with Blue Cheese Dressing ~ John Villa's Boston Lettuce Salad with Green Beans and Lemongrass Dressing ~ Nick Stellino's Mushroom Salad ~ Marcus Samuelsson's Asparagus and Bean Sprout Salad with Dill Pesto ~ Michael Romano's Warm Shrimp and Bean Salad with Arugula ~ Kerry Hefffernan's Roasted Root Vegetable Salad ~ Walter Staib's Curried French Lentil Salad and Sage Sausage ~ Terrance Brennan's Roasted Beet Salad with Arugula and Aged Goat Cheese ~ Terrance Brennan's Pear and Gorgonzola Salad

SOUPS AND STEWS

Jim Coleman's Chicken Pot Pie ~ John Doherty's Fresh Pea Soup with Brook Trout Goujonettes and Parsley Salad ~ Rick Moonene's Gazpacho ~ Roe Di Bona and Sue Torres' Chilld Avocado and Grapefruit Soup with Chipotle Chili Purée ~ Pilan Sanchez's Potato and Garlic Soup ~ Mike Smith's Corn and Potato Chowder ~ Richard Vellante's Caldo Verde ~ Eric Ripert's Onion Soup ~ Jane and Michael Stern's Cincinnati Five-Way Chili ~ Sara Moulton's Miniature Pumpkin Soup with Ginger and Toasted Pumpkin Seeds ~ David Amorelli's White Bean and Sausage Stew ~ Waldy Malouf's Turkey Noodle Soup

PASTA AND RISOTTO

Michael Lomonaco's Basic Pasta Dough ~ Mario Batali's Basic Pasta Sauce ~ Michael Lomonaco's Fresh Homemade Pasta with Wild Mushrooms ~ Mario Batali's Zitia al Tellfono ~ Eric Ripert's Steamed Mussels with Linguine ~ Alfonso Contrisciani's Sweet Potato Gnocchi ~ Bobby Flay's Saffron with Sautéed Shrimp ~ Nick Stellino's Pasta all'Arrabbiata ~ Nick Stellino's Pasta with White Mushrooms ~ Rick Moonen's Orecchiette with Cockles and Sweet Grape Tomatoes ~ Mike Smith's Lobster and Squash Risotto

VEGETARIAN MAIN COURSES

Michael Romano's Eggplant Parmigiana ~ Bill Wavrin's Mushroom Potato Burgers ~ Jeanette Maier's Hearty Root Vegetable and Lentil Stew with Three Herbs ~ Brian Whitmer's Baked Polenta with Rosemary Roasted Portobello Mushrooms and Winter Tomato Sauce ~ David Walzog's Black Bean Casserole ~ David Walzog's Asparagus and Cremini Mushroom Barley "Risotto"

FISH AND SEAFOOD

Amanda Hesser's Mussels with Garlic and Fresh Herbs ~ Erik Blauberg's Spanish Mackerel with Sautéed Potatoes, Cremini Mushrooms, and Spicy Tomatoes ~ Eric Ripert's Shrimp Tabbouleh ~ Alfred Portale's Cod with Brussels Spourts, Yukon Gold Potatoes, and Onions ~ Rick Moonen's Salmon Burgers with Green Tartar Sauce ~ Paul Opitz's Bay Scallops and Crab Meat à la Chesapeake ~ Michael Lomonaco's Pan-Roasted Halibut with Spring Vegetables ~ David Reardon's Pan-Seared Scallops and Oyster Mushroom Sweet Potato Salad with Cilantro Ginger Vinaigrette ~ Henry Meer's Brook Trout Steamed with Vegetables ~ Tom Douglas's Crispy Fried Snapper with Chili Ponzu ~ Marcus Samuelsson's Horseradish-Baked Salmon with Carrot-Ginger Broth and Mussels ~ Richard Vellante's Polenta-Crusted Salmon with Fall Vegetables and Chestnuts ~ Kerry Heffernan's Skate with Sautéed Beet Greens and Boiled Potatoes ~ Joseph Tucker's Tuna Sambuca ~ Jamie Shannon's Crawfish Boil

POULTRY

Jim Botsasco's Lemon Garlic Roasted Chicken ~ Joseph T. Bonanno, Jr.'s Grilled Stuffed Chicken ~ Michael Lomonaco's Chicken Fricassee ~ Lou Puiggi's Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Couscous ~ Scott Campbell's Stuffed Chicken Legs with Mushroom Stuffing ~ Terrance Brennan's Chicken Piccata with Cauliflower, Capers, Sage, and Orange ~ Charlie Palmer's Seared Chicken Breast with Red Onion Vinaigrette ~ The American Heart Association's Spicy Grilled Chicken ~ Waldy Malouf's Cold Herbed Roast Chicken with Marinated Japanese Pear Tomatoes ~ Spinach-Stuffed Chicken Breast with Mushroom Sauce ~ John Doherty's Roast Breast and Braised Leg of Chicken with Olive and Lemon Potatoes and String Beans ~ Alfonso Contrisciani's Pepper-Crusted Turkey "London Broil" with Mushroom Confit ~ Ray Arpke's Turkey Breast Scaloppine with Mushrooms and Mustard Butter Sauce

MEATS

Ertik Blauberg's "Blau-burger" ~ Michael Lomonaco's Chile-Rubbed Beef Pot Roast ~ Thomas Salamunovich's Lamb with Slow-Roasted Vegetables ~ Jim Villa's Thai Pork "Dumplings" ~ Matthew Lake's Grilled Pork Chop with Black Bean Salsa, Grilled Sweet Potatoes, and Roasted Corn ~ Matt Reichel's Berghoff's Pepper Steak ~ Ira Freehof's Meatloaf ~ Michael Lomonaco's Marinated and Grilled Pork Medallions ~ John Schenk's Chili Rubbed London Broil with Barbecued Onions ~ Mario Batali's Pork Scaloppine ~ Aaron Bashy's Pork Spareribs with Polenta ~ Peter Kelly's Roasted Rack of Pork, Butternut Squash Purée, and Julienned Apples ~ Linda West Eckhardt's Beef and Tomato Stif-Fry with Whiskey and Black Bean Sauce

SIDES

Michael Lomonaco's Quince Fruit Mustard ~ Jane and Michael Stern's Coleslaw ~ Jeanette Maier's Sautéed Red Russian Kale ~ Michael Lomonaco's Mustard and Mint Beet Salad ~ Erik Blauberg's Picked Vegetables ~ Ira Freehof's Shredded Zucchini ~ Ira Freehof's Roast Garlic Mashed Potatoes ~ Richard Sandoval's Roasted Poblanos ~ John Schenk's Barbecued Onions ~ John Schenk's Yukon Gold Potato and Horseradish Salad

DESSERTS

Mario Batali's Peaches with Balsamic Vinegar and Black Pepper ~ Ray Arpke's Poached Pears with Raspeberry Sauce and Soft-Peaked Cream ~ Matt Reichel's Apple Strudel ~ Mathew Tivy's Warm Blueberry Pie with Almond Crumb Topping ~ John Doherty's Irish Tiramisù ~ Don Pintabona's Polenta Lemon Cake with Fresh Berries ~ Michael Romano's Panna Cotta ~ Alex Garcia's Dulce de Leche ~ Ira Freehof's Strawberry Shortcake ~ John Villa's Coconut Rice Pudding with Fresh Mango ~ Matthew Lake's Pineapple Brown Betty ~ Erica Miller's Chocolate Banana Terrine ~ John Doherty's Warm Chocolate Cherry Crumble ~ Michael Lomonaco's Flourless Chocolate-Walnut Brownie Torte ~ Robert Bruce's Un Deux Trois Quatre Cake ~ Waldy Malouf's Best Chocolate Chip Cookies

Read More Show Less

Foreword

Foreword

In the hours before sunrise on Saturday mornings, midtown Manhattan is a dark and desolate place. If you walked the streets at 5 A.M., you might wonder whether New York really deserved the nickname "the city that never sleeps." But there are signs of life even in these wee hours -- a few errant cab drivers, deli-counter people, regally attired doormen, and the crew of the CBS News program that I've been producing since 1997.

All television shows evolve over the years and ours is no exception; we've even changed the title from the original CBS News Saturday Morning to The Saturday Early Show. But there's one component of the program that's been a constant since the first morning we took to the airwaves -- the weekly segment called "Chef on a Shoestring" on which we invite a well-known restaurant chef or food personality to prepare a three-course meal for four on a budget of just $20.

The concept for Chef on a Shoestring grew organically from our formative days of a show on a shoestring; when the broadcast was first conceived, we were short on money, personnel, and time. It seems amazing in hindsight, but we had just two and one-half months to pull the whole thing together.

Cooking segments are an unofficial prerequisite for weekend morning shows, and when it came time to devise ours, I found myself taking a self-pitying view of my own understaffed and time-starved circumstances. But then a delicious idea hit me -- put a chef in similar straits and see what happens. "Chef on a Shoestring," I whispered to myself, and the segment was on its way.

Of course, I didn't want just any chefs. I wanted the best chefs the city -- and the country -- had to offer. And their response was gratifying. Most of the chefs have appeared on other shows and in numerous print articles and, of course, they create food in the country's best restaurants. But this was a new challenge for them -- one as it turned out they were eager to meet.

At our next staff meeting, I ran the "Chef on a Shoestring" concept by the staff hoping that a producer would want to take it on. A young associate named Kelly Buzby modestly offered to "give it a shot." Well, her first shot ended up setting the tone for what today, three years later, remains the model every Saturday segment. For our fast-approaching first week, Kelly lined up Michael Lomonaco, who ran the kitchen at the '21' Club and now has a show (Epicurious) on the Discovery Channel and is at Windows on the World. This was the first real test. We gave Michael just $20 and sent him to the Union Square Greenmarket to purchase the ingredients as our camera watched. This shopping trip became the signature opening of "Chef on a Shoestring." (I have to point out that the segment is currently produced by the equally talented Jee Park.)

For our debut on September 13, 1997, Michael demonstrated how to make Tomato and Basil Salad and Chicken Fricassee; he served apples and cheese for dessert. At the end of the show, our cohost Russ Mitchell invited viewers to write in for the recipe. The following week, we got our first inkling of how popular this segment would be as bag after bag of mail came pouring in. Our staff and interns gradually worked their way through the piles, sending printed recipes to viewers around the country. It was a phenomenon that grew every week, and continues to grow today. Eventually we began posting the recipes on our Web site, but -- even though we get 20,000 hits per week -- the letters continue to pour in. And we love it.

The "Chef on a Shoestring" TV segment reflects the times in which we live and, by extension, the times in which we cook. Though the economy (at least at the time of this writing) is booming, I still think that people generally feel on the losing end of things. We all seem to have less and less free time, and sometimes we feel we're getting less for our money, whether it's in diminished service or the quantity and quality of the goods we buy. When the chef of an upscale restaurant shows up on our program, shopping in a regular supermarket or grocery store and then preparing uncommonly accessible recipes, it offers a very comforting and affordable view of the world and delivers something that is too often lacking in our lives today: value.

Thanks to this segment, we've been privileged to meet and work with some of the most respected chefs in the country. They have graciously donated their time, creativity, and personality to our show. The budget may be on a shoestring, but our chefs have done everything to ensure that the recipes in this book are rich in every other way.

Hal Gessner
Executive Producer
The Saturday Early Show

April 2000, New York City

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)