Chemical Magic

( 3 )

Overview


Classic guide provides intriguing entertainment for readers while elucidating sound scientific principles. More than 100 unusual stunts demonstrate cold fire, dust explosions, a nylon rope trick, a disappearing beaker, a glass dissolving in water, and much more. Step-by-step instructions also stress safety precautions. Second edition, revised by E. Winston Grundmeier.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Revised)
$6.95
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.30   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Chemical Magic

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
(Save 13%)$6.95 List Price

Overview


Classic guide provides intriguing entertainment for readers while elucidating sound scientific principles. More than 100 unusual stunts demonstrate cold fire, dust explosions, a nylon rope trick, a disappearing beaker, a glass dissolving in water, and much more. Step-by-step instructions also stress safety precautions. Second edition, revised by E. Winston Grundmeier.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486676289
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 7/27/1993
  • Series: Dover Books on Chemistry Series
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 773,665
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 8.43 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Read an Excerpt

CHEMICAL MAGIC


By Leonard A. Ford

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1993 E. Winston Grundmeier
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-13673-8



CHAPTER 1

I. FOAMS

• Black Foam

Action:

Two 200 ml. beakers are standing on the table. You pick them up, pour a clear liquid from one beaker into the other, which is one-third full of a white powder. Stir well with a stirring rod for a few seconds and then place the beaker on the table. When you place a white cardboard behind the beaker, the material begins to darken and gives off fumes. In a few minutes a black solid will rise several inches above the beaker.


You Need:

About 10 ml. of concentrated sulfuric acid in the first beaker; powdered sugar in the second; stirring rod.


Why:

Black carbon remains when the sulfuric acid removes the elements hydrogen and oxygen from sugar. Gases formed cause the material to rise or foam.


Suggestions:

For an instantaneous reaction, try the following experiment. From two 200 ml. beakers, pour two liquids simultaneously into an empty 400 ml. beaker. One contains 50 ml. concentrated sulfuric acid; the other is a concentrated sugar solution made by dissolving 130 grams of sugar in 100 ml. of water. Immediate reaction with considerable frothing occurs when the liquids come in contact. A large plate should be under the beaker to catch the overflow.

Both methods are satisfactory. The first one, however, produces sulfur dioxide fumes that are somewhat suffocating in a small room. The formation of black carbon gives the demonstration a special appeal.

CAUTION: Handle sulfuric acid with great care.


• Pharaoh's Serpent

Action:

Into a small evaporating dish is placed some yellow powder and a few drops of liquid. Oh slowly heating this mixture a "snake" suddenly leaps out of the dish in a cloud of smoke.


You Need:

Three grams para nitroacetanilide; small evaporating dish; one ml. concentrated sulfuric acid.


Why:

Dehydration is demonstrated. Gas and carbon are formed in the chemical action.


How:

After placing the para nitroacetanilide in the evaporating dish, you add the acid. On heating for two or three minutes, a reaction suddenly occurs and the "snake," which may be over a foot long and several inches in diameter, darts upward.


Suggestions and CAUTION:

The "snake" is composed of carbon. Gases generated in the reaction escape. Some sulfur dioxide gas is formed. Considerable smoke rises to the ceiling at the moment of reaction. This resembles the dome-shaped cloud formed at the explosion of the atomic bomb. The smoke and gas formed in this reaction are irritating to the eyes and lungs. The experiment should therefore be performed shortly before spectators leave the room. In a large room with a high ceiling the fumes and smoke produce little or no irritation.

CHAPTER 2

II. COLOR CHANGES; INVISIBLE INKS


Bloody Picture

Action:

You hold a clear card in one hand and proceed to draw a bloody picture with a finger of your other hand.


You Need:

Five grams potassium thiocyanate; five grams ferric chloride.


How:

Add a few ml. of water to each salt to make saturated solutions. The card is covered with the strong potassium thiocyanate solution. The finger has been dipped in ferric chloride solution.


Why:

Ferric ion reacts with thiocyanate ion to give the red color. This is a sensitive test for the ferric ion.


Suggestions:

You pick up a dagger and thrust it over the back of your hand. You appear to draw blood. The dagger has been dipped in the potassium thiocyanate solution and the back of the hand coated with ferric chloride solution.


Jug of Mystery

Action:

Water is poured from a jug into a series of six empty water glasses. The glasses become filled with liquids colored: (1) red, (2) white, (3) blue, (4) black, (5) green, (6) amber.


You Need:

In the jug, five grams of ferric ammonium sulfate in 500 ml. of water; in each of the glasses, about half a gram of the following solids dissolved in a few ml. of water: (1) potassium thiocyanate, (2) barium chloride, (3) potassium ferrocyanide, (4) tannic acid, (5) tartaric acid, (6) sodium hydrogen sulfite.


Why:

1. Thiocyanate ion forms a deep red color with iron (III).

2. Barium ion forms a white cloudy precipitate with sulfate ion.

3. Ferrocyanide ion forms a deep blue compound with iron (III).

4. Tannic acid forms a black complex with iron (III).

5. Tartaric acid forms a greenish complex with iron (III).

6. Hydrogen sulfite ion forms an amber product with iron (III).


Suggestions:

Good lighting helps to make this foolproof experiment effective chemical magic. Use a decorative-appearing jug. Be sure to use the ferric compound, not the ferrous, in the jug. For patriotic colors, use only the first three glasses.


Hot and Cold Colors

Action:

A pink liquid in a liter beaker stands on the demonstration desk. You heat the liquid and the color fades. On cooling the color returns.


You Need:

A drop of concentrated ammonia in 500 ml. beaker of water to which has been added a few drops of phenolphthalein.


Why:

A shift of the equilibrium between ionized ammonium hydroxide to un-ionized ammonia takes place on heating. This change causes loss in color.


Suggestions:

If you wish to speed up the demonstration use a large test tube which can be heated quickly in a flame and then cooled under the tap.

If the color does not disappear on heating, you likely have too much ammonia in the solution.

• Invisible Ink

Action:

You place a blank card over a flame. Black letters slowly appear.


You Need:

A blank card about 6 × 10 inches made of heavy paper; concentrated sulfuric acid.


Why:

Illustrates the dehydrating action of sulfuric acid.


How:

Before the demonstration you will write something on the card. The ink used will be concentrated sulfuric acid and the pen will be a small glass rod.


Suggestions:

Heating the card slowly over the flame will tend to concentrate the acid, remove the elements of water from the paper and leave charred carbon at the points of contact.

Should you wish to use this experiment at the beginning of a series of demonstrations you may write the word "Welcome" on the card. At the end of a series of demonstrations you may bring your work to a close with the words "That's all" or a similar notation.


CAUTION:

Be careful when working with concentrated sulfuric acid.


Magic Powders

Action:

Two conical piles of white powder of about five grams each are standing on sheets of white paper. To one side is a large cylindrical white box with a cover. You place both powders in the box and shake. Asking the spectators about the color of the powder in the box, you open it. The color is yellow.


You Need:

Five grams powdered lead nitrate; 5 grams powdered potassium iodide; white box.


Why:

Yellow lead iodide is formed by double displacement.


How:

Grind the chemicals separately in a mortar until they are very finely divided. The box must be vibrated very rapidly in the shaking process to get sufficient contact between the chemicals.


Suggestions:

Dropped into a tall cylinder of water the mixed powders give a beautiful yellow colored suspension of lead iodide.


Liquid Thermometer

Action:

A pink liquid in a beaker is standing on the demonstration desk. The color changes to a distinct blue and then back to pink. These changes are repeated continuously.


You Need:

Three grams cobaltous chloride hydrate dissolved in 500 ml. of alcohol.


Why:

The color change is probably due to the shift in the amount of water attached to the ions of cobalt. When warm, the water leaves the ions to be absorbed by the alcohol. Cooling causes a reversal of the process. These changes continue as long as the solution is alternately heated and cooled.


How:

The beaker containing the pink liquid stands on a small hot plate. When the current is on, heat will cause the solution to change from pink to blue. Switching off the current causes a reversal in the color change. A strong light behind the beaker will help to accentuate the color change.


Suggestions:

To make the solution quite sensitive to temperature changes heat it slightly above room temperature. Then add water dropwise until it is pink. The solution will now remain pink at room temperature.


Magical Writing

Action:

A cardboard stands on the demonstration table. It is painted with three colorless solutions. Colors formed will be red, blue and black.


How:

The cardboard has been rubbed with dry ferric chloride. Solutions are potassium thiocyanate, potassium ferrocyanide and tannic acid.


Action:

A painting of a winter scene is shown to the audience. When warmed above a burner, white snow becomes green.


How:

The snow has been painted with cobalt chloride, which becomes bluish-green on warming. You can tell the audience that you are changing the seasons. On painting the blue-green color with water, a pink color returns to the snow.


Action:

Write on a colorless coarse-grained paper with a paint brush dipped in water and the painting is black.


How:

The paper has been rubbed with equal parts of dry tannic acid and ferric ammonium sulfate.


Action:

Write on a colorless coarse-grained paper with a paint brush dipped in water and the painting is red.


How:

The paper has been rubbed with equal parts of dry sodium salicylate and ferric ammonium sulfate.


Action:

Write on a colorless coarse-grained paper with a paint brush dipped in water and the painting is blue.


How:

The paper has been rubbed with equal parts of dry sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ammonium sulfate.


Action:

Using an atomizer, spray a white cardboard with ferric chloride solution. The American flag with all its colors will appear.


How:

An outline of the flag had previously been made with a lead pencil. The stripes had been painted with potassium thiocyanate, the stars with potassium ferrocyanide and the staff with tannic acid solution.


• Mystery Water

Action:

Water from a decorative opaque jug is poured into a series of seven glasses with many peculiar color changes.


You Need:

Jug; seven empty water glasses; five grams tannic acid, a few ml. each of saturated solutions of ferric chloride, oxalic acid, concentrated ammonia and concentrated sulfuric acid.


Why:

Black "ink" results from complex formed of tannic acid and ferric ion (glasses 2 and 4). In glass 5, the oxalic acid forms a nearly colorless complex with iron (III) by displacement of tannic acid.

In glass 6, ammonia displaces tannic acid-ferric complex to form a yellowish complex.

In glass 7, sulfuric acid destroys this complex to yield a nearly colorless iron (III) ion (hydrated).


How:

Line up the empty glasses in a row on the demonstration table. Into the jug place the tannic acid. Stirring well, fill the jug with distilled water.

Glasses 1 and 3 are left empty.

Glasses 2 and 4 contain five drops of saturated ferric chloride solution.

Glass 5 contains 15 drops of oxalic acid.

Glass 6 contains 10 drops of ammonia.

Glass 7 contains 5 drops of sulfuric acid.

You are now ready for the performance. You pour water from the jug into the first glass — there is no color change — water appears present.

When the liquid is poured from the jug into the second glass, ink appears to pour out.

Poured into the third glass, water appears to pour out.

Poured into the fourth, ink again appears to come out.

You now pour the liquid from all four glasses into the jug.

When poured into glass 1, ink appears to come out.

Poured into number 2, ink also appears to come out.

Poured into number 5, water appears to form.

Poured into number 6, wine appears to form.

When all are poured into the jug, a jugful of wine appears to form.

The wine poured into number 7 appears to form water.


Patriotic Colors

Action:

From a bottle you pour a liquid into each of three beakers standing on a demonstration table. You produce the colors red, white and blue.


You Need:

Solution of alcohol containing phenolphthalein in the first beaker; concentrated lead nitrate in the second beaker; and concentrated copper sulfate in the third beaker. The bottle contains dilute ammonium hydroxide.


Why:

The action of ammonium hydroxide with the reagents in the beakers produces color changes. In the first beaker, the color change is due to an indicator. Double displacement occurs in the second and a complex ion is formed in the third.


How:

A few drops of reagent in each beaker is sufficient. The intensity of the color depends on the number of drops of reagent used.


Suggestions:

The demonstration has good audience response. It is quite foolproof, and effective with good lighting.


Red and Blue Cloth

Action:

You take a piece of moistened cloth in the hand and dip it into a solution in a beaker. The cloth becomes bright red. Dip into a second beaker and the cloth becomes bright blue.


You Need:

Twenty grams ferric chloride; five grams potassium thiocyanate; ten grams potassium ferrocyanide.


Why:

Two sensitive tests for the ferric ion are demonstrated.


How:

Prepare the three solutions needed for the demonstration by placing each of the chemicals in a separate 400 ml. beaker. Then dissolve the chemicals by adding 100 ml. of water to each. You are now ready to proceed with the demonstration.

Before the performance you moisten the cloth with ferric chloride solution. When you dip the cloth into the potassium thiocyanate solution, the cloth turns red; when you dip it into the potassium ferrocyanide solution it becomes a dark blue.


Suggestions:

The ferric chloride solution poured into the potassium thiocyanate solution turns it a bright red and, when poured into the potassium ferrocyanide solution, dark blue.


Water to Wine to Coffee

Action:

On the demonstration table is a beaker of water. You stir the water vigorously with a glass tube and wine is formed. You place the rod on the table. You now decide to change the wine to coffee. Again you pick up the tube and stir. The wine changes to coffee.


You Need:

Few crystals of potassium permanganate; tannic acid with volume about the size of a small pea; six inches of glass tubing sealed in the middle.


Why:

Water, which becomes wine colored with potassium permanganate, becomes coffee colored in contact with tannic acid.


How:

Previous to the performance you place a crystal or two of potassium permanganate in one end of the tube and tannic acid in the other. Stirring rapidly in the beaker causes the potassium permanganate to dissolve giving the wine color. After placing the tube on the table you stir with the other end causing the tannic acid to react with the permanganate solution giving a coffee color.


Suggestions:

Failure of the experiment may be due to using too large a quantity of the chemicals.


Whiskey to Water

Action:

A whiskey bottle almost full of whiskey stands on the demonstration table. You pick it up, give it a quick shake and the color disappears. The whiskey seems to have changed to water.


You Need:

A large highly decorated whiskey bottle with screw cap; 0.5 gram finely powdered sodium thiosulfate; tincture of iodine.


Why:

Oxidation of sodium thiosulfate by iodine results in a colorless solution.


How:

Add water to the bottle. Into this pour a few drops of tincture of iodine to give it the whiskey color.

The powder is suspended directly below the screw cap of the whiskey bottle. This permits rapid mixing. A satisfactory arrangement can be made from a small sheet of metal and a stiff wire. Shape the metal sheet into a container about 15 mm. long, 5 mm. high and 5 mm. wide. Push the wire through this little metallic cup and then through the cap in such a way that the powder will be suspended about one inch below the base of the cap. Labels over the neck of the bottle will conceal the thiosulfate container.

Powder sodium thiosulfate in a mortar. The powdered salt reacts more quickly than the crystalline form.


• Wine to Water to Milk

Action:

You hold up a wine bottle. It is half filled with a liquid that looks like wine. From a Florence flask you pour an invisible material into the wine bottle and wine appears to change to water. The colorless solution is then poured into a milk bottle and this bottle becomes filled with a liquid that appears to be milk.


You Need:

Wine bottle, milk bottle, 500 ml. Florence flask, five grams sodium sulfite, dilute sulfuric acid, few crystals of potassium permanganate, three grams barium chloride.


Why:

Wine-colored potassium permanganate oxidizes sulfur dioxide gas with the formation of sulfate ions in a colorless solution. When poured into the milk bottle the colorless solution forms white insoluble barium sulfate which gives it the appearance of milk.


How:

Fill the Florence flask with sulfur dioxide. You can generate the gas by the action of a few mls. of dilute acid on the sodium sulfite. Use a large test tube with rubber stopper and delivery tube. Collect the gas by downward displacement. Test with moistened litmus to determine if the flask is filled with gas.

The wine bottle contains 2 ml. of sulfuric acid, a few crystals of potassium permanganate dissolved in water.

The milk bottle contains the barium chloride in a few mls. of distilled water. Add enough water to make a saturated solution.


Suggestions and CAUTION:

Keep the face well away from suffocating fumes of sulfur dioxide. Use a little potassium permanganate to give the wine color. The gas can decolorize only a limited amount.


• Water to Milk to Water

Action:

Three quart milk bottles are standing on the table. The first appears to be half full of water. The others appear to be empty.

You pour the water from the first into the second, changing the water to milk, and the milk formed in the second is poured into the third bottle. Milk formed in the second appears to change to water in the third.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from CHEMICAL MAGIC by Leonard A. Ford. Copyright © 1993 E. Winston Grundmeier. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Mystery Demonstrations
Be Careful
"Motion, Sound and Color"
The Stage
Visibility
Magic Platter
Demonstrations
I. Foams
  Black Foam
  Pharaoh's Serpent
II. Color Changes; Invisible Inks
  Bloody Picture
  Jug of Mystery
  Hot and Cold Colors
  Invisible Ink
  Magic Powders
  Liquid Thermometer
  Magical Writing
  Mystery Water
  Patriotic Colors
  Red and Blue Cloth
  Water to Wine to Coffee
  Whiskey to Water
  Wine to Water to Milk
  Water to Milk to Water
  Wonder Picture
  Acid Breath
III. Gas Liberation; Bubbling
  Bubbling Columns
  Educated Moth Balls
  Fire Extinguisher
  Magical Eggs
  Soap Bubbles
  Carbon Monoxide
  Mysterious Balloons
IV. Air Pressure
  Blowing Through Glass
  Egg in a Bottle
  Fast Rusting
  Heavy Air
  Geyser
  Mystery Fountain
  Oxygen in Air
  Obedient Bottle
  Syphon Fountain
  Upside-Down Water Glass
V. Boiling Liquids and Vaporization
  Boiling Water in Paper
  Phosphorus Glow
  Cold Boiling
  Drinking Bird
VI. Fires and Combustion
  Blue Flare
  Burning Sugar Lump
  Candle Tricks
  Burning Water
  Cold Fire
  Glowing Steel Ball
  Disappearing Flame
  Flare
  Eating a Candle
  Ether Fires
  Fire Spray
  Fireworks
  Fire Water
  Fire Writing
  Glowing Splint
  Fire in the Water
  Fire Wand
  Glowworm
  Obedient Candle
  Delayed Fire
  Self-Lighting Candles
  Rat Nest
  Spontaneous Fires
  Test Tube Fire
  Turpentine Fire
  Thermite Reaction
  Volcano
  Smoke Screens and Explosions
VII. Explosions
  Chemical Cannon
  Dust Explosions
  Exploding Flame
  Phosphorus Explosion
  Nitrogen Triiodide Explosions
VIII. Crystallization and Precipitation
  Chemical Garden
  Crystal Growth
  Crystal Moss
  Crystals
  Lead Tree
  Orange Tree
  Snow Tree
  Freezing Without Cooling
IX. Freezing and Gel Formation
  Cold Gas
  Fast Freezing
  Hard Water
  Regelation
X. Smoke and Vapors
  Violet Vapors
  Violet Smoke
  Smoke
  Smoke Blown Through Glass
  Smoke Producer
  Smoke Rings
XI. Specific Gravity
  Floaters
  Wine Tower
XII. Polymerization
  Synthetic Rubber
  Nylon Rope Trick
XIII. Delayed or Consecutive Reactions
  Disappearing Blue
  Disappearing Orangeade
  Magic Ink
  Synthetic Gold
  Oscillating Clock Reaction
XIV. Miscellaneous
  Disappearing Beaker
  Osmosis
  Pulsing Mercury
  Glass Dissolves in Water
  Vibratory Motion
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2009

    Brings excitement to chemistry

    My best friend found this book when we were both in junior high in the early '80s and then found it here just recently. Back then we were able to perform several of the more exciting (hazardous) experiments with no ill effects to ourselves or our surroundings - except for the big purple iodine stain on the wooden box we set our contact explosive! This book has lots of fun experiments that bring excitement to chemistry. Unfortunately, it was written in a time when parents and teachers weren't so paranoid about kids playing "mad scientist" so a lot of the chemicals needed are very difficult if not outright impossible to acquire - even for an adult!

    For example, one experiment demonstrates the topic of phosphorescence using white phosphorus. GASP - white phosphorus! You terrorists are going to make a bomb!! Hardly. Of course this stuff is dangerous, but perfectly safe if you know how to handle it and have adult supervision. The problem is it's now completely illegal to own at all. Big Brother to protect you once again! There are still lots of other less exotic experiments in the book one can perform with compounds that are still fairly accessible so there is still good experience and fun to be had.

    If you are looking for some nostalgia in remembering your own "mad scientist" days as a kid or would like to introduce your own kids to the topic of chemistry, I'd highly recommend this book. It definitely brings back memories of fun summer days while in junior high, just like C.L. Stong's Amateur Scientist!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2003

    I little hard

    This book is filled with great experiments, but as a teacher it doesn't tell you how to fit it into your lesson plans.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2002

    Cool!!!!!!!

    This book is awesome!! It has great reactions if you have the right chemicals to do them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)