Chemical Notes for the Lecture-Room

Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 Excerpt: ...22; S. g. = 1520: 100 cu. in. weigh 47'5 grains. History.--First discovered by Black, in 1757, who called it' fixed air.' Preparation.--Whenever C burns in a plentiful supply of 0, C02 is invariably produced:--1.--By pouring a strong acid upon any Carbonate. Usually Lime Carbonate (CaC03) is taken, in the ...
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Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 Excerpt: ...22; S. g. = 1520: 100 cu. in. weigh 47'5 grains. History.--First discovered by Black, in 1757, who called it' fixed air.' Preparation.--Whenever C burns in a plentiful supply of 0, C02 is invariably produced:--1.--By pouring a strong acid upon any Carbonate. Usually Lime Carbonate (CaC03) is taken, in the form known as Marble, the acid being Hydrochloric Acid (HC1), when the C0a escapes and Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) remains: CaCOs + 2HC1 = CaCla + H20 + CO,. Because Ca is a divalent element, it requires 2 atoms of univalent matter to combine with it; 2 atoms of HC1 are therefore necessary in the above equation. 2.--Combustion, and the respiration of man and animals, produce large quantities of C02; it is also produced by the putrefaction and decay of all kinds of organic matter, by fermentation, and the germination of seeds. (See p. 51.) The gas may be collected over water or by displacement, as it is much heavier than the air. Properties.--A colourless and transparent gas, with a slightly acid taste and smell; it reddens blue litmus-paper. It does not burn with flame, it extinguishes a lighted taper, and precipitates lime-water white, the precipitate being soluble in an excess of the gas. It is poisonous and destructive of animal life, but is necessary to the growth of plants. Plants take the C from C02, giving back the 02 to the air, and so an increase of C0% in the atmosphere is prevented. Under a pressure of 36 atmospheres (that is 36 x 15, or 540 lbs. on the square inch), C02 is converted into a liquid; it can also be obtained in the form of a solid resembling snow. It is always present in the air; 100 pints of air contain 0-04 pint of C02, and 100 pints of air breathed from the lungs contain 3-5 pints of C02. The gas is soluble in water,--100 pints of ...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781151415783
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 5/28/2012
  • Pages: 38
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.08 (d)

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