Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 9 / Edition 1

Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 9 / Edition 1

by Anna Marchlewska-Koj
     
 

This volume presents recent progress in our understanding of various mechanisms involved in chemical communication between individual animals. Such communication is important for survival and reproduction of any vertebrate species in a variable environment. Apart from visual and acoustic signals, many animals developed highly complex means of conveying message by

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Overview

This volume presents recent progress in our understanding of various mechanisms involved in chemical communication between individual animals. Such communication is important for survival and reproduction of any vertebrate species in a variable environment. Apart from visual and acoustic signals, many animals developed highly complex means of conveying message by odor and taste. Low molecular weight and volatile compounds known as pheromones affect many metabolic processes and behavioral traits. The chapters in this book are derived from presentations and discussions at the Ninth International Symposium on Chemical Signals in Vertebrates, held at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, on July 25-29, 2000. The four days and nights of discussions at the conference explored diverse topics in chemical communication, and many of the chapters in this volume were improved by revisions in which the authors took into account the discussions in Krakow.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306466823
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
01/01/2001
Edition description:
2001
Pages:
482
Product dimensions:
1.13(w) x 7.00(h) x 10.00(d)

Table of Contents

Ecological and Evolutionary Aspects of Chemical Communication. From individuals to population: field studies as proving grounds for the role of chemical signals; D. Müller-Schwarze. The economic consequences of advertising scent mark location on territories; S.C. Roberts, L.M. Gosling. Do chemical alarm signals enhance survival of aquatic vertebrates? An analysis of the current research paradigm; R.S. Mirza, D.P. Chivers. Mechanisms of olfactory foraging by Antarctic procelliiform seabirds; G.A. Nevitt. Ecological aspects of house mouse urinary chemosignals; L.C. Drickamer. Information in scent signals of competitive social status: The interface between behaviour and chemistry; J.L. Hurst, et al. Molecular approaches in chemical communcation of mammals; E.P. Zinkevich, V.S. Vasilieva. Structure and Neuronal Mechanisms of Chemosensory Systems. Neural mechanisms of communication: from pheromones to mosaic signals; R.E. Johnston. A unique subfamily of olfactory receptors; J. Strotmann. Odours are represented in glomerular activity patterns: optical imaging studies in the insect antennal lobe; C.G. Galizia, et al. Spatial representations of odorant chemistry in the main olfactory bulb of the rat; B.A. Johnson, M. Leon. Prenatal growth and adult size of the vomeronasal organ in mouse lemurs and humans; T.D. Smith, et al. Size of the vomeronasal organ in wild Microtus; L.M. Maico, et al. Oxyin, norepinephrine and olfactory bulb mediated recognition; D.E. Dluzen, et al. A possible humoral pathway for the priming action of the male pheromone androstenol on female pigs; T. Krzymowski, et al. Chemical Structure of Pheromones and Binding Proteins. Demonstration of volatile C19-steroids in the urine of femaleAsian elephants, Elephas maximus; M. Dehnhard, et al. The pheromone of the male goat: function, sources, androgen dependency and partial chemical characterization; R. Claus, et al. Analysis of volatile compounds in scent-marks of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and their possible function in olfactory communication; H. Hofer, et al. Mice, MUPs and myths: structure-function relationship of the major urinary proteins; R.J. Beyon, et al. Polymorphic variants of mouse major urinary proteins; C. Veggerby, et al. Differential responses elicited in male mice by MUP-borne odorants; A. Cavaggioni, et al. Characteristics of ligand binding and release by major urinary proteins; D.H.L. Robertson, et al. Chemical communication in the pig; D. Loebel, et al. Prenatal Chemical Communication. Inter-fetal communication, and adult phenotype in mice; J.G. Vandenbergh, A.K. Hotchkiss. The role of the main and accessory olfactory systems in prenatal olfaction; D.M. Coppola. Fetal olfactory cognition preadapts neonatal behavior in mammals; B. Schaal, et al. Olfaction in premature human newborns: detection and discrimination abilities two months before gestational; L. Marlier, et al. Intrauterine position effects on rodent urinary chemosignals; L.C. Drickamer. Kin, Individual and Sexual Recognition. Social status, odour communication, and mate choice in wild house mice; N. Malone, et al. Effects of inbreeding and social status on individual recognition in mice; C.M. Nevison, et al. Heterogeneity of major urinary proteins in house mice: population and sex differences; C.E. Payne, et al. Genetic differences in odor discrimination by newborn mice as expressed by ultrasonic calls; J. Kapusta, H. Szentgyörgyi. Enhanced immune functi

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