The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

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Overview

Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi.

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American ...

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Overview

Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi.

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American history and considers its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning historian Theda Perdue and coauthor Michael D. Green explain the various and sometimes competing interests that resulted in the Cherokee's expulsion, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle their difficult years in the West after removal.

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Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times
With a rich sense of Cherokee culture and history . . . the authors . . . recount a human story, not only tragic but also unbelievably heroic.
Publishers Weekly

This compact book by eminent historians Perdue and Green moves from the time when all Cherokees "lived in the southern Appalachians" to their forced expulsion to the Indian Territory, as American policy morphed from "civilizing" Native Americans to what might today be deemed ethnic cleansing. The Indian Removal Act (1830) fixed in law "a revolutionary program of political and social engineering that caused unimaginable suffering, deaths in the thousands, and emotional pain that lingers to this day." It's a tangled tale of partisan politics and Cherokee power struggles, of juridical argument and economic motive, of bitter personal disputes and changing public policy. Perdue (Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast) and Green (The Cherokee Removal) have written a lucid, readable account of the legal complexities of the 18th-century "right of conquest doctrine" and the 19th-century "emerging doctrine of state rights"; the treaties, alliances, obligations and assurances involved; and the landmark cases Cherokeev. Georgiaand Worcester v. Georgia(one effectively denying Cherokee self-government, one ineffectively affirming Cherokee sovereignty). Over it all hangs the disquieting knowledge that in the history of interaction between Euro-Americans and Indians, Cherokee removal "[exemplifies] a larger history that no one should forget." (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
A brief account of the Cherokee people and its tragic encounters with European and American newcomers. One of the first volumes in the new Penguin Library of American Indian History, this study by Perdue and Green (both History/Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) sets the Trail of Tears removals of the 1830s in the context of a long history of conflict, alliance and failed treaties with the British crown and the U.S. government. The former regarded the Cherokees' vast domain, which extended from north Georgia to Kentucky, as a resource to be used when the proper time came, believing "that Indian land fell far short of its potential productivity." Even so, the British preferred the buffer zone that the Cherokees provided between their holdings and those of the French to any other gains, and so crown policy specifically forbade encroachment by land-hungry colonials. The American government had no such scruples; Thomas Jefferson, working from what he considered to be consistent Enlightenment principles, held that the Cherokees were capable of learning to be civilized-which meant going to work in factories, shopping at stores, incurring debt, etc.-and that selling their land to white settlers was the first step toward that end. "He ordered his agents to intensify the pressure on the tribes to sell more and larger tracts of land," write the authors, "and he let it be known that threats, intimidation, and bribery were acceptable tactics to get the job done." In the post-War of 1812 flush of newfound nationalism and the first formulation of Manifest Destiny, the Cherokee were pushed aside while their lands, increasingly, saw encroachment by farmers, miners and other white settlers. For theirown good, supposedly, the Cherokees were finally marched off to reservations in eastern Oklahoma-removals that, the authors write, cost the Cherokee people thousands of dead and thousands more unborn. An illuminating history, devoted to an often overlooked and long-suffering people.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143113676
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/24/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 425,887
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 5.02 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

THEDA PERDUE , Ph.D. , formerly was president of the American Society for Ethnohistory. She is a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has been appointed to a Guggenheim fellowship. MICHAEL D. GREEN , Ph.D. , is a professor of history and American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    Its most certainly is not an imagination inspiring work but it h

    Its most certainly is not an imagination inspiring work but it has valuable information that has assisted in my research paper for my university term paper. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    Ming

    (Its ok. My dad took mine once too.)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    Zuko

    (Sprry. Mom took my nook.)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Great

    Yes quite nice, quite, mmmmm. Very nice indeed, but really this has a lot of information kand its really good to use for projects and what not. Good luck.

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