Cherubs in the Land of Lucifer: Personal and Professional Encounters with Death

Overview

We live in an age of wonders. Medicine can cure some cancers…bring people whose hearts have stopped back to life. We can take a fetus and grow it up into a person. This is not science fiction, this is medicine today. Cherubs follows one man's journey, from the farms in North Carolina to this incredible miraculous world of modern medicine. It is a coming of age story that is written within the same genre as All Creatures Great and Small and House of God. It is about a doctor and his dying infant patients; a son ...
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Overview

We live in an age of wonders. Medicine can cure some cancers…bring people whose hearts have stopped back to life. We can take a fetus and grow it up into a person. This is not science fiction, this is medicine today. Cherubs follows one man's journey, from the farms in North Carolina to this incredible miraculous world of modern medicine. It is a coming of age story that is written within the same genre as All Creatures Great and Small and House of God. It is about a doctor and his dying infant patients; a son and his dying father; and a country that daily struggles to reconcile its modern death-stopping technology with the reality that sooner or later, people must die. The back drop for this book is a preoccupation with the experience of death. As a physician and an educator, Dr Gordon has an ulterior motive for wanting the American public to explore this topic. Medicine is fast becoming a mushrooming bureaucracy in which there is ever-increasing specialty and anonymity…pulling doctors away from their patients. In medical education, house staff duty hours have become more humane, but there is a tendency towards newer generations to view medicine as shift work. There is, simply put, a growing loss of patient ownership in each successive generation of American physician. This is not a dry book about policy or medical history. One reader said, "HOLY COW, it's riveting. This is GOOD. yetch, that snake--very good. I can practically smell the damn thing...and the minute you introduced the vipers I knew something would happen. Great sense of foreboding." Another said, "The introduction caught my breath and the Sin of the Serpent had me in tears. Thank you for writing this. You really have a gift for putting your experiences into very meaningful words."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591138853
  • Publisher: Booklocker.com, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2006
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.61 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2006

    You will blow through this book!

    Cherubs in the Land of Lucifer is an earthy, well written memoir that draws the reader into the topic one mesmerizing chapter at a time. If it were nothing else it would be a compelling book simply for the insight it provides into the medical world and into the psychie of the medical mind. But Gordon goes beyond that and explores what is dying in the modern world like, for all of humanity, on every level, for a variety of personality types - which he plays out using an almost Shakesperean caste of tragic characters (his immediate family). If you want a compelling read that will leave you thinking about things afterwards...this is it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2006

    Entertaining Death

    Everyone has wondered about it, few have seen it, no one talks about it. Phill Gordon moves deftly between tragedy and comedy as he traces his experiences with death through his life, from his childhood in a rural community through his career as a neo-natal intensive care doctor and beyond to his struggle with his own father¿s death. Few doctors find the time to write about their strange and dramatic lives on the front line of the war against death, especially those who work in high pressure areas like ICU¿s and ER¿s. Gordon gives us fascinating glimpses into the world of medicine, the fear of making life and death decisions, the exhilaration of snatching a baby out of the jaws of death, the disappointment of failure. I recommend this book highly to anyone who thinks that some day he or she might, just possibly, die.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2006

    A moving journey through life and death

    Don't decide not to read this book because it is about death and dying. This is a journey through life, in which death is always a part. I found this book to be funny, interesting, and thought-provoking. Explore your own thoughts as you experience the thoughts of this neonatologist from childhood to adulthood. This is well worth your time.

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