Chicago Haunted Handbook: 99 Ghostly Places You Can Visit in and Around the Windy City

Overview


EXCERPTS

Wrigley Field
1060 West Addison Street, Chicago, Illinois 60613

Directions:
From the center of Chicago, take I-90 West for 2 ½ miles to exit 48A, the Armitage Avenue exit. Turn sharp right onto West Armitage Avenue and then take your second left onto North Ashland Avenue. Follow Ashland for 2 ...

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Chicago Haunted Handbook: 99 Ghostly Places You Can Visit in and Around the Windy City

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Overview


EXCERPTS

Wrigley Field
1060 West Addison Street, Chicago, Illinois 60613

Directions:
From the center of Chicago, take I-90 West for 2 ½ miles to exit 48A, the Armitage Avenue exit. Turn sharp right onto West Armitage Avenue and then take your second left onto North Ashland Avenue. Follow Ashland for 2 miles before turning right onto West Addison Street. Wrigley Field will be on your left after a little more than a half a mile.

History:
A little more than a month before being elected President of the United States, Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelt sat in the stands at Wrigley Field. It was game 3 of the 1932 World Series. It was the top of the fifth inning. After having fallen behind 3-0 in the first inning, the home team, the Chicago Cubs had fought back to tie the game at 4. Charlie Root was on the mound as Yankees slugger Babe Ruth stepped up to the plate.

Ruth opted not to swing at the first pitch that caught the strike zone and smacked the catcher’s mitt. The stadium erupted into applause and taunts were extended from the Cubs’ bench. The next two pitches missed the zone then the fourth pitch again caught the zone and the stadium erupted into cheers. The count was 2-2. Then something unheard of happened. Only in baseball where the rules never change, where a game played in 1932 could be the same game played today and where a story can be passed down from generation to generation without becoming antiquated, can something like this happen and the legend live on like it has. As Root prepared to pitch, Ruth extended the index finger on his right hand and pointed towards center field. Root delivered. Ruth swung and connected. Few who were there that day or who would hear about that hit would dispute that, as the ball sailed over the center field wall, this was the stuff of legend and despite how audacious or pretentious calling his home run might have been, Babe Ruth is and will always be remembered for that home run.

The Cubs would get swept in that series. It wouldn’t be the last World Series that they would lose. As any Cubs fan knows, they hold the record for the longest drought between world championship wins in professional sports. They have not won a World Series since 1908. They have never won a World Series since they moved to Wrigley Field in 1916 two years after it was built. In Chicago though, this doesn’t matter. Once a Cubs fan, always a Cubs fan. Even though they haven’t won the championship for more than 100 years, they will always have their fans. The fans are there through the good times and the bad, through the legendary moments and the quiet seasons that fade into history. They stand by their Cubs in the oldest stadium in the National League and the second oldest stadium in professional baseball, Wrigley Field. Some of the greatest fans such as announcer Harry Caray, songwriter Steve Goodman, and player/manager Charlie Grimm have perhaps stayed behind after their deaths.

Ghost Story:
There are three famous ghosts that are said to haunt Wrigley Field. The first is that of legendary announcer Harry Caray. The ghost of Harry Caray most famously haunts the press box and the adjacent bleachers at the stadium. Most people who experience Caray’s ghost report an unexplainable feeling that they have while in these areas that there is a presence there that they cannot see. Others will report strange mists in these areas that they attribute to Caray’s ghost.

The next ghost is that of songwriter Steve Goodman who not only wrote many songs about his beloved Cubs but also had his ashes scattered at Wrigley Field when he died from leukemia in 1984 at the age of 36. People will sometimes report seeing the ghost of Steve Goodman sitting in the seats behind home plate, watching the Cubs play even after death.

The third ghost is Charlie Grimm, the manager who led the Cubs to the 1932 World Series. Security in the ballpark after dark have reported the phone in the bullpen ringing on its own accord. Guards have also reported hearing their names called out by some unseen entity and have actually seen a figure resembling Grimm walking through the park or the hallways of the park. They attribute the bullpen phone and the name calling to Grimm since his ashes are also housed within the park. His ashes are supposedly housed in a private box in left center field.

Visiting:
While the best time to visit a ballpark is always during a game day, Wrigley Field also offers guided tours during baseball season where you can visit places that the public is not often able to go. Regardless of when you go, it is well worth a trip to this legendary ballpark. Wherever you sit, you may experience the ghosts of any of the Cubs fans who have passed through this park throughout the last 100 years.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781578605279
  • Publisher: Clerisy Press
  • Publication date: 9/24/2013
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 682,223
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author


Jeff Morris achieved his degree in English from the haunted Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and spent the early part of his career as an English instructor at a college in Cincinnati. While teaching, Jeff became interested in the ghost stories in the Cincinnati area. In 2005, he started working with his brother, Michael Morris, on their first book, Haunted Cincinnati and Southwest Ohio, which was published in June of 2009 by Arcadia Publishing. Beyond the book, Jeff has become very involved in the paranormal field in the Midwest. In 2006 he and his brother founded Miamitown Ghost Tours, which continues to run year round. In 2009, they joined a paranormal investigation group called CAPER (Cincinnati Area Paranormal Existence Research), and they started an online radio show called “Miamitown Ghost Talk.” In the fall of 2010, both Jeff and Michael published Cincinnati Haunted Handbook. He lives in Cincinnati.

Vince Sheilds was born in Elgin, IL in 1984. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 2002 and, upon discharge in 2006, moved to Chicago where his fascination with the paranormal really took form. There he formed his website for Chicago Paranormal Investigators with his teammates. They started investigating local haunted hot spots, Chicago favorites, and private homes.

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Read an Excerpt


Wrigley Field
1060 West Addison Street, Chicago, Illinois 60613

Directions:
From the center of Chicago, take I-90 West for 2 ½ miles to exit 48A, the Armitage Avenue exit. Turn sharp right onto West Armitage Avenue and then take your second left onto North Ashland Avenue. Follow Ashland for 2 miles before turning right onto West Addison Street. Wrigley Field will be on your left after a little more than a half a mile.

History:
A little more than a month before being elected President of the United States, Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelt sat in the stands at Wrigley Field. It was game 3 of the 1932 World Series. It was the top of the fifth inning. After having fallen behind 3-0 in the first inning, the home team, the Chicago Cubs had fought back to tie the game at 4. Charlie Root was on the mound as Yankees slugger Babe Ruth stepped up to the plate.

Ruth opted not to swing at the first pitch that caught the strike zone and smacked the catcher’s mitt. The stadium erupted into applause and taunts were extended from the Cubs’ bench. The next two pitches missed the zone then the fourth pitch again caught the zone and the stadium erupted into cheers. The count was 2-2. Then something unheard of happened. Only in baseball where the rules never change, where a game played in 1932 could be the same game played today and where a story can be passed down from generation to generation without becoming antiquated, can something like this happen and the legend live on like it has. As Root prepared to pitch, Ruth extended the index finger on his right hand and pointed towards center field. Root delivered. Ruth swung and connected. Few who were there that day or who would hear about that hit would dispute that, as the ball sailed over the center field wall, this was the stuff of legend and despite how audacious or pretentious calling his home run might have been, Babe Ruth is and will always be remembered for that home run.

The Cubs would get swept in that series. It wouldn’t be the last World Series that they would lose. As any Cubs fan knows, they hold the record for the longest drought between world championship wins in professional sports. They have not won a World Series since 1908. They have never won a World Series since they moved to Wrigley Field in 1916 two years after it was built. In Chicago though, this doesn’t matter. Once a Cubs fan, always a Cubs fan. Even though they haven’t won the championship for more than 100 years, they will always have their fans. The fans are there through the good times and the bad, through the legendary moments and the quiet seasons that fade into history. They stand by their Cubs in the oldest stadium in the National League and the second oldest stadium in professional baseball, Wrigley Field. Some of the greatest fans such as announcer Harry Caray, songwriter Steve Goodman, and player/manager Charlie Grimm have perhaps stayed behind after their deaths.

Ghost Story:
There are three famous ghosts that are said to haunt Wrigley Field. The first is that of legendary announcer Harry Caray. The ghost of Harry Caray most famously haunts the press box and the adjacent bleachers at the stadium. Most people who experience Caray’s ghost report an unexplainable feeling that they have while in these areas that there is a presence there that they cannot see. Others will report strange mists in these areas that they attribute to Caray’s ghost.

The next ghost is that of songwriter Steve Goodman who not only wrote many songs about his beloved Cubs but also had his ashes scattered at Wrigley Field when he died from leukemia in 1984 at the age of 36. People will sometimes report seeing the ghost of Steve Goodman sitting in the seats behind home plate, watching the Cubs play even after death.

The third ghost is Charlie Grimm, the manager who led the Cubs to the 1932 World Series. Security in the ballpark after dark have reported the phone in the bullpen ringing on its own accord. Guards have also reported hearing their names called out by some unseen entity and have actually seen a figure resembling Grimm walking through the park or the hallways of the park. They attribute the bullpen phone and the name calling to Grimm since his ashes are also housed within the park. His ashes are supposedly housed in a private box in left center field.

Visiting:
While the best time to visit a ballpark is always during a game day, Wrigley Field also offers guided tours during baseball season where you can visit places that the public is not often able to go. Regardless of when you go, it is well worth a trip to this legendary ballpark. Wherever you sit, you may experience the ghosts of any of the Cubs fans who have passed through this park throughout the last 100 years.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments Forward Introduction

Section I: Cemeteries
Algonquin Cemetery Archer Woods Cemetery Bachelor's Grove Cemetery Bluff City Cemetery Burr Oak Cemetery Cavalry Cemetery Channing Cemetery County Farm Cemetery (Joliet Potter's Field)
Evangelical Church Cemetery Graceland Cemetery Holy Sepulcher Cemetery Mt. Carmel Cemetery Mt. Thabor Cemetery Naperville Cemetery Oak Hill Cemetery and the Demon Butcher Oak Woods Cemetery Queen of Heaven Cemetery Read Dunning Memorial Grounds Resurrection Cemetery River Valley Memorial Gardens Rose Hill Cemetery St. James Sag Cemetery Tyrell Road Cemetery White Cemetery Woodlawn Cemetery

Section II: Bars and Restaurants
Al Capone's Hideaway and Steakhouse Bucktown Pub California Clipper Cigars and Stripes Clark Street Ale House Country House Restaurant Drinkingbird Edgewater Lounge Ethyl's Party Excaliber Night Club Fireside Lounge Gold Star Bar Green Mill Cocktail Lounge Hooters on Wells Steet House of Blues Irish Legend Ivy Liar's Club Metro and Smart Bar Tonic Room Webster's Wine Bar Willowbrook Ballrooms

Section III: Roads and Bridges
Archer Avenue Axemans Bridge Blood's Point Road Camp Douglas Clarence Darrow Memorial Bridge Cuba Road Death Corner Eastland River Disaster Site Flight 191 Crash Location Fox River Grove Bus Crash Frank "the Enforcer" Nitti's Death Site German Church Road Munger Road Train Tracks Randall and 72
Show Factory Road Square Barn Road St. Valentine's Day Massacre Site

Section IV: Parks
Dead Man's Creek Emmerich Park Fort Dearborn Massacre Joliet Arsenal Magic Hedge Maple Lake Memorial Park Park in Covered Bridge Trails Raceway Woods Robinson Woods Forest Preserve Sunrise Park The Gate Trout Park Wrigley Field

Section V: Museums, Theaters, Hotels, and Other Buildings
Cantigny Colonel Palmer House Jane Addams Hull House Polish Museum of America Antioch Movie Theater Arcada Theater Biograph Theater Ford's Oriental Theater Rialto Theater Baymont Inn and Suites (208)
Congress Plaza Hotel Harpo Studios Hotel Baker Leland Tower Suites Sheraton Gateway Suites Hotel Chicago Water Tower Edgewater Athletic Club Huntley Grease Factory John Hancock Center Manteno State Hospital Murder Castle O'Hare Airport

Appendix 1: Chapters Organized Geographically Appendix 2: Daytripping (or in this case...nighttripping)
Appendix 3:
Appendix 4: Location Checklist About the Authors

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