The Chicago Schoolhouse: High School Architecture and Educational Reform, 1856-2006

Overview

School buildings are vitally important in American lives, yet largely invisible in the landscape of architectural studies. The schoolhouse’s significance cannot be overestimated in a country where education is not only compulsory, but is also an integral part of the national self-image. Between the ages of five and eighteen, the average American child spends more time in a school building than in any other single place outside the home. With The Chicago Schoolhouse Dale Gyure fills a void in the architectural and...

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Overview

School buildings are vitally important in American lives, yet largely invisible in the landscape of architectural studies. The schoolhouse’s significance cannot be overestimated in a country where education is not only compulsory, but is also an integral part of the national self-image. Between the ages of five and eighteen, the average American child spends more time in a school building than in any other single place outside the home. With The Chicago Schoolhouse Dale Gyure fills a void in the architectural and educational records by examining the physical structures where formal education happens and by drawing connections between school architecture and educational reform.

Centered on an analysis of Chicago school buildings at the high school level, this study seeks to illuminate nationwide developments and explain how we have arrived at the current state of school architecture. It will be of great value to those interested in architectural history and the cultural history of secondary education.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Dale Gyure is associate professor of architecture at Lawrence Technological University, where he teaches classes in architectural history and theory, and an adjunct professor of historic preservation at Goucher College, where he teaches a course in American Architectural History and serves as co-director of the master’s thesis program.

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Table of Contents

List of Figures ix

Acknowledgments xiii

Introduction xv

Part I Beginnings 3

1 Education and Architecture in Early Chicago 5

The Birth of the American High School 6

Public Education in Chicago 10

Educational Theory and Practice 22

Part II Transformation 33

2 The Transformation of the Schoolhouse 35

A New Type of School 35

The Last Division High Schools 40

The End of the Century 53

3 Educational and Societal Reforms 57

High School and Society 57

Educational Reforms 76

4 Chicago's Progressive Era High Schools 91

William Mundie's Classical Schools 93

Dwight Perkins's Alternative Vision 109

A. F. Hussander's Monumental School Plants 123

Part III Development 131

5 Roaring Twenties, Depression, and War 133

The Roaring Twenties 134

The Depression 140

The 1940s 150

6 Modernism and Education 157

A New Type of School for the Postwar Era 157

Architectural Modernism in the 1950s 160

The Differentiated Curriculum 181

Upheaval and Experimentation in the 1960s and 1970s 185

7 Into the New Century 209

Reform and Reorganization 209

Old Ideas for a New Century 212

Chicago High Schools at 150 Years 217

Appendix 221

References 225

Index 275

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