The Chicago Tribune Tower Competition: Skyscraper Design and Cultural Change in the 1920s / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$29.18
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $30.95
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 3%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $30.95   
  • New (3) from $30.95   
  • Used (2) from $58.98   

Overview


In 1922, the Chicago Tribune sponsored an international competition to design its new corporate headquarters. Both a serious design contest and a brilliant publicity stunt, the competition received worldwide attention for the hundreds of submissions—from the sublime to the ridiculous—it garnered.

In this lavishly illustrated book, Katherine Solomonson tells the fascinating story of the competition, the diverse architectural designs it attracted, and its lasting impact. She shows how the Tribune used the competition to position itself as a civic institution whose new headquarters would serve as a defining public monument for Chicago. For architects, planners, and others, the competition sparked influential debates over the design and social functions of skyscrapers. It also played a crucial role in the development of advertising, consumer culture, and a new national identity in the turbulent years after World War I.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

San Francisco Chronicle - Kenneth Baker

"Solomonson's history of the competition to design one of America's most famous buildings sets a fine example of how to portray ambitions—artistic and other kinds—against the social background of their times. Scores of illustrations show the dizzying variety of designs that contended against John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood's soaring finalist. Solomonson shows that far more than money, prestige and recognition rode on the competition: the '20s saw the birth of the idea of architecture as corporate branding. At stake was the image that Chicago and implicitly America projected to the larger world."
Chicago Tribune - Deborah Fausch

"A fascinating social and material history. . . . Offers an exemplary model for anyone seeking to understand what buildings mean to people."
Art Bulletin - Michael J. Lewis

"[A] brisk and thorough analysis of the world's most famous architectural competition."
American Studies International - Richard Longstreth

“What distinguishes Solomonson’s endeavor is the range of broader issues that are integrated with architectural ones immediately at hand. Matters of Americanization and community, or city planning and urban design, of corporate symbolism and artistic expression, of historicity and modernity, and of differing cultural perspectives among countries are among the numerous areas examined. . . . The range of material presented in a rigorous and engaging narrative should render the book of benefit to many scholars concerned with American culture as well as with the built environment. Solomonson has produced an exemplary case study that is likely to enjoy longstanding appreciation."
San Francisco Chronicle
"Solomonson''s history of the competition to design one of America''s most famous buildings sets a fine example of how to portray ambitions-artistic and other kinds-against the social background of their times. Scores of illustrations show the dizzying variety of designs that contended against John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood''s soaring finalist. Solomonson shows that far more than money, prestige and recognition rode on the competition: the ''20s saw the birth of the idea of architecture as corporate branding. At stake was the image that Chicago and implicitly America projected to the larger world."-Kenneth Baker, San Francisco Chronicle

— Kenneth Baker

Times Literary Supplement

"Solomonson understands the issues and writes engagingly not only about the competition itself, but about the architectural and commercial cultures—both European and American—that formed its backdrop."
Chicago Tribune
"A fascinating social and material history. . . . Offers an exemplary model for anyone seeking to understand what buildings mean to people."

— Deborah Fausch

Architectural Science Review

"[Solomson tells] the fascinating story of this competition, the diverse designs it attracted, and its lasting impact. . . . This is the most detailed account of its history published so far."
Art Bulletin
"[A] brisk and thorough analysis of the world''s most famous architectural competition."--Michael J. Lewis, Art Bulletin

— Michael J. Lewis

American Studies International
"What distinguishes Solomonson's endeavor is the range of broader issues that are integrated with architectural ones immediately at hand. Matters of Americanization and community, or city planning and urban design, of corporate symbolism and artistic expression, of historicity and modernity, and of differing cultural perspectives among countries are among the numerous areas examined. . . . The range of material presented in a rigorous and engaging narrative should render the book of benefit to many scholars concerned with American culture as well as with the built environment. Solomonson has produced an exemplary case study that is likely to enjoy longstanding appreciation."

— Richard Longstreth

Times Literary Supplement
"Solomonson understands the issues and writes engagingly not only about the competition itself, but about the architectural and commercial cultures-both European and American-that formed its backdrop."-Times Literary Supplement
Architectural Science Review
"[Solomson tells] the fascinating story of this competition, the diverse designs it attracted, and its lasting impact. . . . This is the most detailed account of its history published so far."
Chicago Tribune
In Solomonson's careful and many-sided account, Tribune Tower becomes a pole around which the whole pattern of a society turns. Building up from details, she draws together a fascinating social and material history....The book represents a landmark effort to connect architectural discourse to the larger culture of which it is a part....this fine social history offers an exemplary model for anyone seeking to understand what buildings mean to people.
Library Journal
The Tribune Company's 1922 competition to design the "world's most beautiful office building" as its headquarters captured the interest of an international audience of architects, business leaders, and the public at large. Solomonson (Univ. of Minnesota) argues persuasively that the competition, now often relegated to the footnotes of architectural history, was a vortex around which swirled the major currents of debate on skyscraper design, city planning, and the role of business in an industrial/capitalist society. Based on her doctoral dissertation, this thoroughly documented study inspects Hood and Howells's winning entry, runner-up Eero Saarinen's ultimately more influential design, and a host of other proposals, from historicist to avant-garde. A brief and unsatisfactory final chapter tentatively raises the issue of the competition's enduring influence. Architect Stanley Tigerman reenacted the competition in his idiosyncratic Chicago Tribune Tower Competition and Late Entries (1980. o.p.); Solomonson, however, offers the first well-rounded examination of this important episode in the development of the urban skyline. Her fine book is recommended for academic libraries. David Solt sz, Cuyahoga Cty. P.L., Parma, OH Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226768007
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 10/15/2003
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 370
  • Sales rank: 970,039
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Katherine Solomonson is an associate professor of architecture and co-head of the Department of Architecture at the University of Minnesota's College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Planning the Competition
2. "Class Appeal" for the Masses: Imagining Community
3. Conducting the Competition, Shaping an International Agenda
4. Design for Advertising
5. The Gothic Skyscraper: "Ancient Beauty" versus "Ultra Modern"
6. City of Towers: Transforming the Skyscraper
7. Tribune Tower: Constructing a Corporate Icon
Postscript
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)