Chicago's Famous Buildings

Chicago's Famous Buildings

by Franz Schulze, Kevin Harrington
     
 

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One of the premier architectural cities of the United States—if not the world—Chicago boasts a breathtaking skyline, dozens of architectural monuments, and a historic legacy few other cities can equal. And it's still growing! Since its first appearance in 1965, Chicago's Famous Buildings has been the standard and bestselling guide to the city's

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Overview

One of the premier architectural cities of the United States—if not the world—Chicago boasts a breathtaking skyline, dozens of architectural monuments, and a historic legacy few other cities can equal. And it's still growing! Since its first appearance in 1965, Chicago's Famous Buildings has been the standard and bestselling guide to the city's architectural riches. Now thoroughly revised and updated, this fifth edition will remain the leading pocket guide to some of the world's greatest urban architecture.

Chicago's Famous Buildings, fifth edition, completely updated and revised by Franz Schulze and Kevin Harrington, covers more than a decade of extraordinary new architecture and takes a fresh look back at the city's classical legacy of Adler, Sullivan, Burnham, Root, Wright, and Mies van der Rohe. The authors have added many new descriptions and images of the most important projects in Chicago since the fourth edition, including the massive reconstruction of Grant Park around Frank Gehry's Music Pavilion, and they cover as well the current status of older buildings—some destroyed, others, such as Burnham's Reliance Building, marvelously restored and brought back to life. Chicago's Famous Buildings, fifth edition, also includes expanded sections on the city's future and the development of its diverse neighborhoods, presented with new maps to serve as an even more effective walking guide. A glossary of architectural terms, an extensive index, and more than sixty new photographs of both old and new buildings bring this guide completely up-to-date.

Authoritative, informative, and easier to use than ever before, this fifth edition of Chicago's Famous Buildings will serve tourists and residents alike as the leading architectural guide to the treasures of this marvelous city.

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Editorial Reviews

Chicago Tribune - Edward Keegan
"Chicago's Famous Buildings is the grandaddy of the city's architectural guidebooks. Sought by architectural aficionados since its first edition in 1965, its latest incarnation is the fifth. Franz Schulze and Kevin Harrington, art and architectural historians, respectively, have edited the last two editions of this constantly evolving yet still essential volume. . . . Schulze and Harrington write engaging prose that weaves together many aspects essential to a building or neighborhood's creation and interpretation. Their inclusive approach is appropriate for a city of Chicago's enormous diversity."

Atlantic Monthly - Benjamin Schwartz
"Chicago's Famous Buildings has long been the standard guide to the city's most distinguished buildings. . . . Schulze and Harrington are unusually brisk, even saucy, writers, and their descriptions are commendably concrete and vivid. This is an admirable reworking of a book that's at once a classic and a work in progress."
Atlantic Monthly
Chicago's Famous Buildings has long been the standard guide to the city's most distinguished buildings. . . . Schulze and Harrington are unusually brisk, even saucy, writers, and their descriptions are commendably concrete and vivid. This is an admirable reworking of a book that's at once a classic and a work in progress.

— Benjamin Schwartz

Chicago Tribune
“This is the one book on Chicago architecture that everyone should have.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226740669
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
11/28/2003
Edition description:
1
Pages:
358
Sales rank:
1,381,165
Product dimensions:
4.75(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Franz Schulze is the Hollender Professor of Art Emeritus at Lake Forest College and the author of Mies van der Rohe: A Critical Biography, published by the University of Chicago Press.

Kevin Harrington is a professor of humanities and architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Read an Excerpt


Chicago's Famous Buildings



By Franz Schulze and Kevin Harrington


University of Chicago Press



Copyright © 2003


University of Chicago
All right reserved.


ISBN: 0-226-74064-1





Chapter One


[9]
Chicago Cultural Center (1897)
(Originally the Chicago Public Library)
78 East Washington Street
Architects: Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge (1897); restoration, Holabird & Root
(1977)

Chicago had long needed an adequate central public library when Shepley,
Rutan & Coolidge won the commission for this building. As the successor
firm of the late H. H. Richardson (whose Glessner House [123] is his only
surviving Chicago building), they participated in the 1893 World's
Columbian Exposition. Their Art Institute of Chicago had already shown
their skills in large, complex, and symbolic public projects. Sited on a
small public square facing east across Michigan Avenue to rail yards, one
entered the library at its narrow north or south ends. At Washington
Street, to the south, one entered between Ionic columns into a vestibule
dominated by a grand stairway of Carrara marble inlaid with mosaics. At
the top of these stairs is the present Preston Bradley Hall, crowned by a
Tiffany dome. Words and images enliven the surfaces of these spaces,
celebrating language, literature, and the book. The many languages of the
texts acknowledge themultiethnicity of Chicago's people. One text notes
the sweetness of finding, in a foreign land, works in one's mother tongue.

The north entrance on Randolph Street uses the Doric order, associated
with the military, to lead into the spaces of the Grand Army of the
Republic. The GAR was the association of Union veterans of the Civil War.
Its grand staircase leads first to a large room, the GAR Rotunda,
dominated by another stained-glass dome, this time by Healy & Millet.
Beyond is Memorial Hall, where the campaigns of the war are inscribed.
Lincoln and Grant are only the best known of Illinoisans who served the
nation at the time.

As Chicago's population rocketed from 1 million in 1890 to more than 3
million in 1930, the library was soon inadequate to the demands placed on
it. In 1974 the library began its move to temporary quarters in
anticipation of a new central facility, which was completed in 1991.
Holabird & Root completed their conversion and restoration of the building
in 1977. The open U-shaped court on its west side was enclosed with
accessible ramps and other services. Renamed the Chicago Cultural Center,
the building has a rich and eclectic mix of uses including galleries,
performance, lecture, and film spaces, visitor's and senior citizen's
centers, a cafe, a Museum of Broadcast Communication, and offices for the
city's Department of Cultural Affairs.

(Continues...)







Excerpted from Chicago's Famous Buildings
by Franz Schulze and Kevin Harrington
Copyright © 2003
by University of Chicago.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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