A Child of the Jago

( 1 )

Overview

This novel, first published in 1896, is the story of Dick Perrot, born and bred in the Jago; but it is also a brilliant portrait of the community. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. Only the characters themselves are fictional: Morrison's descriptins of the fearful physical conditions are based directly on what he saw. He conjures up an extraordinarily vivid picture of a world which, even as he wrote, was about to ...
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A Child of the Jago

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Overview

This novel, first published in 1896, is the story of Dick Perrot, born and bred in the Jago; but it is also a brilliant portrait of the community. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. Only the characters themselves are fictional: Morrison's descriptins of the fearful physical conditions are based directly on what he saw. He conjures up an extraordinarily vivid picture of a world which, even as he wrote, was about to vanish in one of the first of the slum clearance schemes.
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Editorial Reviews

Dan Bivona
"Diana Maltz's new Broadview edition of Arthur Morrison's classic A Child of the Jago is superb in every respect. With a fine, wide-ranging introduction, helpful notes, and useful appendices identifying the many controversies in which Morrison's work enveloped him, this Jago is destined to become the standard text for readers of this important novel. Broadview has done it again."
Monica Flegel
"This edition is long overdue. The topics for the introduction and appendices are well chosen; in particular, I appreciate the attention to the controversies surrounding and aroused by the text, including the debate on environmentalism versus degradation. Given that even the bulk of the Victorian reading public were outsiders to the language and culture of the Old Nichol, on which the Jago was based, even established Victorianists will benefit from the edition's in-depth explanatory notes. Diana Maltz's edition will help to make the Jago immediately present to a new generation of readers."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781290742177
  • Publisher: Hard Press Editions
  • Publication date: 8/1/2012
  • Pages: 376
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Meet the Author

Arthur Morrison was born on November 1, 1863. Morrison gave conflicting information about his background, and when he died his wife, on his instructions, burned all of his notebooks and papers. He died in December, 1945.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Arthur Morrison: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
A Child of the Jago
Appendix A: The Debate Over the Novel's Veracity
From H. D. Traill, The New Fiction (1897)
From Arthur Osborne Jay, "The New Realism: To the Editor of The Fortnightly Review" (1897)
From Arthur Morrison, "What is a Realist?" (1897)
From Harold Boulton, "A Novel of the Lowest Life" (1897)
From Clementina Black, "A Septet of Stories" (1897)
Appendix B: Deciphering the Slum
From Lady Jeune, "The Homes of the Poor" (1890)
From Charles Booth, Labour and Life of the People (1891)
Appendix C: Class and Heredity: Slum Degeneration and Atavism
From Helen Dendy, "The Children of Working London" (1895)
From "To Check the Survival of the Unfit: A New Scheme by the Rev. Osborne Jay, a Militant Bethnal Green Parson, for Sending the Submerged to a Penal Settlement" (1896)
From Mary Higgs, "Mankind in the Making" (1906)
Appendix D: On Eugenic Discourse in A Child of the Jago
From H. G. Wells, "A Slum Novel" (1896)
From "The Children of the Jago: Slum Life at Close Quarters: A Talk with Mr. Arthur Morrison" (1896)
Appendix E: Restless Energies
From Reginald Bray, "The Children of the Town" (1901)
From C.F.G. Masterman, "Of the Hooligan" (1902)
From Arthur Osborne Jay, Life in Darkest London (1891)
Appendix F: Women and Match-Box Making at Home
From Clementina Black, "Match-Box Making at Home" (1892)
From Raphael Samuel, ed. East End Underworld (1981)
Image: Photo, "Match-Box Making at Home" (c. 1900)
Appendix G: A Nichol Boyhood
From Raphael Samuel, ed. East End Underworld (1981)
Appendix H: Middle-Class Views on Working-Class Economic Practices
From Octavia Hill, "A Few Words to Volunteer Visitors Among the Poor" (1877)
From Helen Dendy Bosanquet, "The Burden of Small Debts" (1896)
From Maud Pember Reeves, Round about a Pound a Week (1913)
Appendix I: Cultural Philanthropy
From Samuel Barnett, "The Universities and the Poor" (1884)
From Sir Walter Besant, All Sorts and Conditions of Men (1884)
From Jack London, The People of the Abyss (1903)
Appendix J: Maps of the Area
Image: Photo, Boundary Street Scheme, Plan No. 26: Map of the Nichol
Image: Photo, Boundary Street Scheme, Plan No. 27: Plan for the Boundary Street Estate

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