Child of the Revolution: Growing up in Castro's Cuba

Child of the Revolution: Growing up in Castro's Cuba

by Luis M. Garcia
     
 

Compelling and vivid, this memoir presents an intimate portrait of Castro’s Cuba through a wide-eyed and eager boy growing up in the 1960s. At the naïve age of 10, Luis M. Garcia, embarrassed by his anti-revolutionary parents, pledges his allegiance to Lenin, Marx, and the mythical Che Guevara, knowing that this is the only path to become a better

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Overview

Compelling and vivid, this memoir presents an intimate portrait of Castro’s Cuba through a wide-eyed and eager boy growing up in the 1960s. At the naïve age of 10, Luis M. Garcia, embarrassed by his anti-revolutionary parents, pledges his allegiance to Lenin, Marx, and the mythical Che Guevara, knowing that this is the only path to become a better revolutionary—and to get out of school early. Told with a detailed intimacy and a gentle humor that conveys the richness and warmth of Cuban life, this memoir illuminates the uncertainty, fear, and political force that tore families apart as Castro sought to destroy capitalism and establish Cuba as a world superpower.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Clever, poignant and witty . . . fascinating reading."  —Peter Corris, author, The Cliff Hardy series

"[This book is] thick with cigar smoke and summer sweat . . . alive with personality."  —Sydney Morning Herald

"Balancing the rich flavor of Cuba’s sweet cigars against the hushed tones and paranoid whispers of its people."  —Cuba News

Booklist
The young boy's coming-of-age brings the forced-immigration story up close.

Publishers Weekly

Born in 1959, journalist Garcia spent his first 12 years in Cuba, plenty of time to pile up grievances against the Communist regime. His parents owned a small haberdashery whose business dried up with the gradual suppression of commerce after the revolution, until it was taken over by the state. When his parents applied to emigrate, his father was sent to a labor camp to cut sugar cane, and the family was meticulously divested of their belongings before being allowed to leave. Garcia's is an emblematic story of the dispossession and exile of Cuba's middle class, leavened with bittersweet reminiscences of his warmly convivial extended family, which comprised both Communist officials and disaffected partisans of the prerevolutionary past. As well, it's a study of the downside of Cuba's revolution�skimpy food rations, endless queues for shoddy goods, beady-eyed busybodies in the neighborhood Committee for the Defense of the Revolution, all justified by strident propaganda in the classroom and media. Garcia's rancorous score-settling with communism can be intrusive; "it's not a very revolutionary thing to do, but... even communists need toilet paper," he gloats about a common unauthorized use for the works of Lenin. But he does offer an intriguing corrective to romanticized accounts of socialist Cuba. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781741148527
Publisher:
Allen & Unwin Pty., Limited
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.62(d)

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