Children and Social Exclusion: Morality, Prejudice, and Group Identity

Children and Social Exclusion: Morality, Prejudice, and Group Identity

by Melanie Killen, Adam Rutland
     
 

“This is an outstanding book. Through their masterful integration of developmental and social psychological theories and research, Killen and Rutland have made a major contribution to our understanding of children’s morality, social identity, exclusion, and intergroup relationships. This very engaging book is a must-read for scholars and others

Overview

“This is an outstanding book. Through their masterful integration of developmental and social psychological theories and research, Killen and Rutland have made a major contribution to our understanding of children’s morality, social identity, exclusion, and intergroup relationships. This very engaging book is a must-read for scholars and others interested in these important and timely topics.”
Judi Smetana, University of Rochester

“This book makes important and unique contributions to the study of intergroup relations, morality, and social development. The authors, who are distinguished scholars in this area, introduce original insights that synthesize past research and will guide research in this area for many years to come.”
John F. Dovidio, Yale University

“This excellent book offers a sweeping treatment of a problem that all people either experience or fear at some time in their lives: social exclusion. The authors examine the problem from a developmental perspective, offering a comprehensive account of the roots, effects, and broader significance of social exclusion during childhood. This original, integrative account now stands as the definitive work on this familiar dimension of children’s social development.”
William Damon, Stanford University

“Killen and Rutland have done an extraordinary job illuminating a critical phenomenon: when and why children exclude other children. This topic has never been more important, and their book is scholarly, fascinating, wise, and extremely valuable. It is a must-read for everyone interested in understanding how to work toward a just society.”
Carol Dweck, Stanford University

Social inclusion and exclusion are pervasive aspects of social life. Understanding when exclusion is legitimate or wrong reflects an understanding of morality. While there are times when exclusion is legitimate and fosters group functioning, there are also times when it reflects prejudicial biases and stereotypic expectations. How children weigh fairness and stereotypic expectations when making exclusion decisions is determined by their understanding of group norms, social identity, and friendships with children from other backgrounds. In our contemporary global society, few topics are as timely or pressing as exclusion. Children and Social Exclusion: Morality, Prejudice, and Group Identity delves deeply into the origins of prejudice and the emergence of morality to explain why children include some and exclude others and sheds light on the origins of stereotyping, prejudice, and social justice.

By tackling these important issues from a global perspective, Children and Social Exclusion: Morality, Prejudice, and Group Identity illustrates how the concept of exclusion might be better understood in multiple cultures and reveals its implications in regions of conflict in the world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Killen and Rutland provide expert broad-ranging reviews of relevant theories, research, and interventions and conclude with an integrative framework for understanding and addressing peer exclusion."  (Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 2012)

"Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals." (Choice, 1 November 2011)

"In sum, as we continue to understand and decipher the development of exclusion and inclusion in children, the framework provided by Killen and Rutland will be an unequivocal guide and impetus for a myriad of empirical studies in the human development field. After reading this impressive book, I believe the future of scholarship in this area (and our collective future) is bright and exciting!" (Human Development Journal, 2013)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118571859
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
06/10/2013
Series:
Understanding Children's Worlds Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
246
Product dimensions:
14.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
This is an outstanding book. Through their masterful integration of developmental and social psychological theories and research, Killen and Rutland have made a major contribution to our understanding of children's morality, social identity, exclusion, and intergroup relationships. This very engaging book is a must-read for scholars and others interested in these important and timely topics.
—Judi Smetana, University of Rochester

This book makes important and unique contributions to the study of intergroup relations, morality, and social development.  The authors, who are distinguished scholars in this area, introduce original insights that synthesize past research and will guide research in this area for many years to come.
—John F. Dovidio, Yale University

This excellent book offers a sweeping treatment of a problem that all people either experience or fear at some time in their lives: social exclusion. The authors examine the problem from a developmental perspective, offering a comprehensive account of the roots, effects, and broader significance of social exclusion during childhood. This original, integrative account now stands as the definitive work on this familiar dimension of children's social development.
— William Damon, Stanford University

Killen and Rutland have done an extraordinary job illuminating a critical phenomenon: when and why children exclude other children. This topic has never been more important, and their book is scholarly, fascinating, wise, and extremely valuable. It is a must-read for everyone interested in understanding how to work toward a just society.
—Carol Dweck, Stanford University

Meet the Author

Melanie Killen is Professor of Human Development, Professor of Psychology (Affiliate), and Associate Director for the Center for Children, Relationships, and Culture at the University of Maryland. She is a Fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. She is also a recipient of the Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Award by the Provost from the University of Maryland. Her book with Dan Hart, Morality in Everyday Life: Developmental Perspectives (1995), received the outstanding book award from AERA, and her book with Sheri Levy, Intergroup Attitudes and Relations from Childhood to Adulthood, received an Honorable Mention for the Otto Klineberg Memorial Prize from SPSSI. Her research examines the development of morality, intergroup attitudes, exclusion and inclusion, peer relationships, prejudice, culture, and how social experience is related to social-cognitive development.

Adam Rutland is Professor of Developmental Psychology at the Child Development Unit and Centre for the Study of Group Processes in the School of Psychology at the University of Kent. Previously he has been a British Academy Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Surrey and been a member of Faculty at the University of Aberdeen. His research examines the development of children's prejudice and social identities. He has conducted recent research into when and how children learn to self-present their explicit attitudes; how intergroup contact can reduce children's prejudice; children's exclusion of peers within groups and acculturation amongst ethnic minority children.

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