BN.com Gift Guide

Children of Dune [NOOK Book]

Overview

The desert planet of Arrakis has begun to grow green and lush. The life-giving spice is abundant. The nine-year-old royal twins, possesing their father's supernatural powers, are being groomed as Messiahs.
But there are those who think the Imperium does not need messiahs...


Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Children of Dune

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

The desert planet of Arrakis has begun to grow green and lush. The life-giving spice is abundant. The nine-year-old royal twins, possesing their father's supernatural powers, are being groomed as Messiahs.
But there are those who think the Imperium does not need messiahs...


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Nine years after Paul Muad'Dib disappeared blind into the deserts of Arrakis at the conclusion of Dune Messiah, his orphaned twins, Ghanima and Leto, are quickly growing up and realizing that they are pawns in an epic struggle for the ultimate power -- control of the Imperium. No one around them can be trusted, as evidenced by Alia, the twins' aunt and official guardian, who has become the Abomination so many feared she would be. She is, in fact, possessed by ancestral voices inside her mind, and one in particular -- the Baron Vladimir Harkonnen -- is pushing her to fulfill her darkest prophecies.

Conspiracies abound in this novel as the cult of Muad'Dib and the post-Paul governmental brain trust seem to be rotting from within. Sensing weakness, greedy factions -- like the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood and House Corrino -- converge on Arrakis to destroy House Atreides once and for all.

Easily the most memorable character in the first sequence of Dune novels is the Preacher, a mysterious prophet introduced in Children of Dune. The blind old man (who may or may not be Paul Muad'Dib) speaks out against the policies of Alia's regency and deplores the way the Fremen culture has become twisted in so little time. Using such a wise, all-knowing character, in my opinion, enabled Herbert to be more didactic in his writing without being too obvious. Through the words of the Preacher, the ecological and evolutionary themes running throughout the first three Dune novels become crystal clear -- a wonderfully emotional conclusion to a brilliant trilogy. Paul Goat Allen

Challenging Destiny
Herbert adds enough new twists and turns to the ongoing saga that familiarity with the recurring elements brings pleasure.
From the Publisher
“Simon Vance anchors this full-cast production. He is engaged with the characters and the complex plot. His presentation of the many characters is skillful, and the narrative passages never lag. Vance has a serious but light touch…” - AudioFile

Praise for Dune:

“One of the monuments of modern science fiction.”—Chicago Tribune on Dune

“Unique…I know nothing comparable to it except The Lord of the Rings.” —Sir Arthur C. Clarke on Dune

“A portrayal of an alien society more complete and deeply detailed than any other author in the field has managed...a story absorbing equally for its action and philosophical

vistas.... An astonishing science fiction phenomenon.”—The Washington Post on Dune

“Powerful, convincing, and most ingenious.”—Robert A. Heinlein on Dune

“Herbert’s creation of this universe, with its intricate development and analysis of ecology, religion, politics, and philosophy, remains one of the supreme and seminal achievements in science fiction.”—Louisville Times on Dune

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440630514
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/3/2008
  • Series: Dune , #3
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 22,113
  • File size: 500 KB

Meet the Author

Frank Herbert was born in Tacoma, Washington, and educated at the University of Washington, Seattle. He worked a wide variety of jobs--including TV cameraman, radio commentator, oyster diver, jungle survival instructor, lay analyst, creative writing teacher, reporter and editor of several West Coast newspapers--before becoming a full-time writer. He died in 1986.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 139 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(78)

4 Star

(37)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 139 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 24, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Another great addition to the dune series!

    Children of dune is a great addition the Dune science fiction series. I really enjoyed reading this book. Leto II is my favorite character in the series after reading this. Children of dune is set 9 years after Dune messiah. Paul and chani's children are 9 years old and have certain memories that they maybe shouldn't about their parents and the past of planet arrakis. This is one of the best in the dune series. I highly recommend it to fans of the series and fans of science fiction in general. Frank Herbert has a unique and great writing style.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2014

    its DUNE

    its DUNE

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2014

    The 3rd Novel in Frank Herbert¿s Dune series, Children of Dune h

    The 3rd Novel in Frank Herbert’s Dune series, Children of Dune has all of the qualities the first novel has and more. As the story continues, the children of the Dune Messiah, Paul Muad’Dib, have very special minds that the entire universe wishes to manipulate into their own personal source of power. However, the children have their own plans for the future. All of them struggle to control the future and end up losing all control. If you are interested in Science Fiction, twisted plot lines, and awesome action then this book is something you should read. Herbert is a great writer and every one of his novels have impressed me and this one was no different.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 26, 2013

    I often caught myself thinking, as I read this book, that this s

    I often caught myself thinking, as I read this book, that this series is beginning to get a little long in the tooth now, after three books.




    In the first book, the plot was to assassinate Duke Leto Atreides. In the second book, it was to assassinate his son, Paul "Maud'Dib" Atreides. Now, in the third book, it is to assassinate his twin children, Ghanima and Leto II. But like the other three, there is way more to it than an assassination plot! There are plots within plots within plots. It's long, convoluted, frustrating and difficult to read at times. But in true Frank Herbert style, just when you think of abandoning the book, some new twist leaps off the pages at you, and you can't put it down until you find out how the new hook will turn out.




    By the third book, the planet of Arrakis has changed so much that it's very difficult to think of it as the same place you encounter in the first book. But still, many things are still the same, and one of the sub-plots is a struggle to return the planet to the way it once was.




    I was planning to give this book two stars, and remove the rest of the series from my to-read list. The ending changed my mind; it shocked me so much that I simply cannot wait to see what happens next!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Liked It

    The planet once called Dune is now known as Arrakis, because of the dramatic and rapid environmental changes. Arrakis is being transformed into a green planet. This is one of the several abominations that are mentioned in this book. Alia, the regent, plans to make the spice even rarer than it is now. With only a handful of worms, there will not be enough spice for all in the Imperium. Another abomination is the religion of Muad'Dib, which the Preacher speaks out against. The Preacher's goal is to bring Paul down from a religious god to just a man. However the question on everyone's mind is, is the Preacher really Paul Atreides? The obvious abomination is that of Alia, filled by all the voices in her genetic line. She repeatedly and purposefully goes into a spice trance, which is the invitation to her possession. The twins fear the possibility of abomination which Alia is not able to withstand against. Adding to Alia's stress is her mother Jessica's return to Arrakis, as a Bene Gesserit. She instructs Gurney on how to test 9-year-old Leto II for possession. Leto is captured at the taboo Sietch Jacurutu and forced to undergo the spice trance. Where in he defeats sub coming to possession and succeeds in finding his own self/person while at the same time he is aware of all the others of the entire Atreides genetic line in his own skin. Every fiber in Leto's being is saturated with spice. His Golden Path is the only way to escape from what has been done to Arrakis. His skin will become not his own as he physically transforms himself into God Emperor. Princess Wensicia tells her son Prince Farad'n of her plot against the Atreides twins. Believed to be a dandy book lover by his mother and useless in her plans to take back the Lion Throne, Farad'n takes Jessica's advice and has his mother exiled. By the Preacher's order, Jessica is eventually sent to Salusa Secundus where she teaches and transforms Farad'n from Corrino into Bene Gesserit. Now he is considered suitable for marriage to Ghanima, which will be the starting point in the Bene Gesserit breeding program that the God Emperor takes over.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Liked It

    The planet once called Dune is now known as Arrakis, because of the dramatic and rapid environmental changes. Arrakis is being transformed into a green planet. This is one of the several abominations that are mentioned in this book. Alia, the regent, plans to make the spice even rarer than it is now. With only a handful of worms, there will not be enough spice for all in the Imperium. Another abomination is the religion of Muad'Dib, which the Preacher speaks out against. The Preacher's goal is to bring Paul down from a religious god to just a man. However the question on everyone's mind is, is the Preacher really Paul Atreides? The obvious abomination is that of Alia, filled by all the voices in her genetic line. She repeatedly and purposefully goes into a spice trance, which is the invitation to her possession. The twins fear the possibility of abomination which Alia is not able to withstand against. Adding to Alia's stress is her mother Jessica's return to Arrakis, as a Bene Gesserit. She instructs Gurney on how to test 9-year-old Leto II for possession. Leto is captured at the taboo Sietch Jacurutu and forced to undergo the spice trance. Where in he defeats sub coming to possession and succeeds in finding his own self/person while at the same time he is aware of all the others of the entire Atreides genetic line in his own skin. Every fiber in Leto's being is saturated with spice. His Golden Path is the only way to escape from what has been done to Arrakis. His skin will become not his own as he physically transforms himself into God Emperor. Princess Wensicia tells her son Prince Farad'n of her plot against the Atreides twins. Believed to be a dandy book lover by his mother and useless in her plans to take back the Lion Throne, Farad'n takes Jessica's advice and has his mother exiled. By the Preacher's order, Jessica is eventually sent to Salusa Secundus where she teaches and transforms Farad'n from Corrino into Bene Gesserit. Now he is considered suitable for marriage to Ghanima, which will be the starting point in the Bene Gesserit breeding program that the God Emperor takes over.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Children of Dune, the Dune Chronicles, Book 3

    Coming soon.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2006

    Amazing

    This book was really good. Not quite as good as the first, but much better than the second. The whole book is interesting. Some chapters focusing on Alia drag on a little, but everything about the twins, the precher, and jessica will keep you reading. The ending is amazing, i think possibly the best ending out of all the dune books. Herbert has a great way of making you feel for the characters, and it shows most in this book. Surprising and very interesting, this book is a must read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2006

    Ignorant, that's what you are when you skip Dune Messiah...

    Children of Dune was no doubt a wonderful book, that's why I gave it the rating that I did...but if you skip Dune Messiah it's because you're ignorant to the messages that it puts out. It gives out way too much information to just skip over. You can't tell me that the death of Chani, and the 'dissapearance' of Paul Muad'dib, the two most important characters of the original trilogy is not important. This book is awesome, but if you skip the one before it, you're not a true fan of Herbet's genius, or his hard work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2005

    I've gotta say something!

    First this book is the real sequl to Dune its really entertaining because its smart and action packed and everything is cloaked in one gigantic mysterie.the best character by far is the preacher i love him because he so mysterious and you get the impresiom hes all powerful.get this book after dune and just borrow dune messiah-that stunk because it was short and boring.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2005

    A warning about this small format 'library binding' softcover edition

    While the content of this book is of course excellent, be warned that this edition is a small format book. Also, the description 'hardback' is misleading, the book is not really a hardback format, it has a softcover glue binding and only the outside is 'hardback'.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2004

    miniseries dune

    I have seen the miniseries for dune and children of dune. They were the most enspiring thing that you can watch, and for that matter, read. A book that is recammended for all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2003

    The most significant of them all

    I'm going to try to keep this nice and short. To understand the entire Dune Chronicles, especially the end, you have to read Children of Dune. It's literally the prologue to God Emporer of Dune, the greatest of all Dune books. Children of Dune sets the stage of the events that will unfold on Dune. True there are some drawn out chapters, but if you don't read it from beginning to end, you won't see how all those things come together at the end. To really understand the Golden Path, and especially the sacrifice Leto II makes, you have to read Children of Dune, it takes you into the reasons of the why and how Leto is the way he is in God Emporer of Dune, and how he changes Arrakis forever...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2003

    Great Book

    This book is an outstanding expansion of the Dune World. It is much darker than you might expect with an ending that leaves you wanting to get into the God Emporer phase immediatey

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2002

    Good but could have been condensed

    Great book, although i was disappointed in the length of it. This part of the series did indeed need to be told, but had some drawn out chapters which were indeed boring

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2002

    Not living up to the other books

    I'm a huge fan of the dune books but this by far was the worst of them i disliked it so much i didn't even finish it. Herbert try to much to be deep when not much more than a soap oprea is going on.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2000

    Greatest book ever... yes...

    Without a doubt this enables you the reader to step back from every day life here... the way he writes and everything... Just within the book itself it's wonderful... the twins, the characters in general........ but after reading this... you can't look at anything the same... You are missed Frank Herbert.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2000

    Best So Far

    This is the greatest of the Dune books up to it's release. It surpasses both Dune and Dune Messiah in it's Mystery and Intrigue, leaving the reader with the desire to see it to the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 139 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)