Children of the Revolution (Inspector Alan Banks Series #21)

Children of the Revolution (Inspector Alan Banks Series #21)

3.9 31
by Peter Robinson
     
 

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Multiple award-winning, New York Times and #1 internationally bestselling author Peter Robinson returns with Children of the Revolution, a superb tale of mystery and murder that takes acclaimed British Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks back to the early 1970s—a turbulent time of politics, change, and radical student activism.

The

Overview

Multiple award-winning, New York Times and #1 internationally bestselling author Peter Robinson returns with Children of the Revolution, a superb tale of mystery and murder that takes acclaimed British Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks back to the early 1970s—a turbulent time of politics, change, and radical student activism.

The body of a disgraced college lecturer is found on an abandoned railway line. In the four years since his dismissal for sexual misconduct, he’d been living like a hermit. So where did he get the 5,000 pounds found in his pocket?

Leading the investigation, Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks begins to suspect that the victim's past may be connected to his death. Forty years ago the dead man attended a university that was a hotbed of militant protest and divisive, bitter politics. And as the seasoned detective well knows, some grudges are never forgotten—or forgiven.

Just as he’s about to break the case open, his superior warns him to back off. Yet Banks isn’t about to stop, even if it means risking his career. He's certain there’s more to the mystery than meets the eye . . . and more skeletons to uncover before the case can finally be closed.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
03/15/2014
Robinson's latest Inspector Banks mystery (after Watching the Dark) features the ever-intriguing detective investigating the death of a former college instructor. The body is discovered on railway tracks underneath a bridge, and the victim has a large amount of money still in his pocket. The circumstances suggest blackmail to Banks, who proceeds to dig into the dead man's past for clues. Robinson's sympathetic portrayal of the victim, Gavin Miller, depicts a man without family and with few friends, whose welfare is treated with casual disregard even by those closest to him. Banks instinctively senses that more information about Miller's life and character will lead the police to the killer. Intertwined with the story are more decisions and personal issues for the popular DI; he is considering a promotion that, if accepted, will make changes to his future plans. Unfortunately, his falling once again for a much younger woman will irritate some readers, as Banks's repeated affairs with various young women erode his appeal. VERDICT Fans of mystery and suspense will enjoy this excellent story from an award-winning author. [See Prepub Alert, 10/20/13.]—Linda Oliver, MLIS, Colorado Springs
Publishers Weekly
02/10/2014
In Edgar-finalist Robinson’s absorbing 21st novel featuring Det. Chief Insp. Alan Banks (after 2013’s Watching the Dark), Gavin Miller lives in poverty-stricken isolation after allegations of sexual misconduct cost him his job as a college lecturer. Yet when his battered body is found near a disused Yorkshire railway track, he has £5,000 in his pocket. Believing the money came from drug sales or blackmail, Banks and his team investigate both the recent misconduct charges and Miller’s college days decades earlier. Banks quickly uncovers a link between the victim and Lady Veronica Chalmers, once a Marxist rebel and now a successful romance novelist and aunt to the probable next home secretary. Robinson excels at connecting his detectives’ personal stories to the investigation, endowing familiar characters with fresh nuance and depth. Impeccable pacing fleshes out Miller’s tragic life and unravels the killer’s motive. Agent: Dominick Abel, Dominick Abel Literary Agency. (Apr.)
Booklist (starred review) on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Consistently fun...[A] first-rate procedural and character study..”
Seattle Times on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Banks is a fully rounded character - smart, dogged and not above defying his superiors. The supporting cast is equally strong, including the wonderfully named Detective Sergeant Winsome Jackman and Lady Veronica Chalmers, an aristocrat whose radical activities during her university years link her to the dead man.”
Booklist on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Consistently fun...[A] first-rate procedural and character study..”
Providence Journal on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Meticulously detailed...This is a fine, twisty, surprising tale.”
Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Robinson again succeeds in creating a satifyingly confounding mystery and increasing the already formidable depth of his superb ensemble cast.”
Wall Street Journal
“Superb mystery series...outstanding.”
USA Today
Praise for Peter Robinson and the Detective Banks series: “Robinson rolls out a police procedural with exquisite precision.”
New York Times Book Review
“Ambitious…Robinson shows a keen awareness of the global reach of crime.”
New York Post
“It’s easy to relate to and root for Banks.”
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-03-06
Robinson's latest Inspector Banks novel is an English murder mystery sure to please lovers of the genre. The body of Gavin Miller shows up on a lonely pathway beneath a railroad bridge in the Yorkshire countryside. Was it an accident? Or suicide? Or murder? The dead man has £5,000 in his pocket, so robbery seems an unlikely motive. DCI Alan Banks heads the investigation, which leads him and his team to ask unwelcome questions of some rich and powerful people. Banks digs deeply, learning about radical political pasts dating back to the 1960s and '70s, when people read Karl Marx, talked of revolution and did plenty of dope. Today they think that's all in the past, and the past won't return to haunt them. In any event, Miller had seemed like a shabby loser and a drunk—so what was he doing with all that money? Responding to outside pressure, Banks' boss tells him to back off the investigation, which of course a good fictional detective doesn't do. He and fellow detectives Cabbot and Winsome are smart and determined, with just the right amount of attitude to make them likable. Readers who grew up in the age of bands like The Doors and Led Zeppelin will appreciate the frequent references to the rock music of that era. Robinson's descriptions are rich and beautifully done, although now and then the detailed scene-setting slows the pace too much. This is a mystery that depends less on action than on DCI Banks' thought process. It's well-plotted and satisfying right to the end. Robinson has won many awards for his Detective Banks novels (Watching the Dark, 2013, etc.), and with this latest, he demonstrates his mastery of the craft.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062240552
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/25/2014
Series:
Inspector Alan Banks Series , #21
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
37,911
File size:
859 KB

Meet the Author

Peter Robinson's award-winning novels have been named a Best-Book-of-the-Year by Publishers Weekly, a Notable Book by the New York Times, and a Page-Turner-of-the-Week by People magazine. Robinson was born and raised in Yorkshire, but has lived in North America for more than twenty-five years. He now divides his time between North America and the U.K.

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Children of the Revolution 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
MissBethBC More than 1 year ago
Skeletons in the closet indeed!   This was an excellent police procedural with lots of twists and turns. Children of the Revolution refers to that of the sixties and early seventies and there is much reference to bands and their music and the eclectic tastes of Inspector Alan Banks.    Yes, those were the good ole days.   No witnesses, few clues at all and an introverted dead professor, sends Inspector Banks and his team on a wild goose chase in the present and forty years ago as well. Robinson had a well plotted mystery and supported his solution with well developed characters who exuded intricate personality defects.   Internal strife and rivalry also paved the way of the investigation.  This was one of the more interesting police procedurals  I've read recently --a very enjoyable read!
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
Banks is an investigator in Yorkshire and is debating about retiring and saying goodbye to the police force.  An intriguing case gets him excited about his job as a former college professor is not only found dead but in an interesting spot that complicates the murder mystery.   Another mystery that took place in England and felt very similar to ones that I have recently read and just moved way too slow for me.  Because the flow wasn't there the ending wasn't as satisfying, so I may have to think twice about picking up the next one in this series.
SherryF More than 1 year ago
A step by step approach to a murder investigation I have read several books by the prolific writer, Peter Robinson – Playing With Fire, Friend of the Devil and All the Colors of Darkness – so I was very happy to have won Children of the Revolution. The cover led me down a path to murder and wicked political machinations. They do make, to me, not such strange bedfellows. If you want a detailed, step by step, approach to an investigation of a murder, this is the book for you. Children of the Revolution is a convoluted tale that drives Banks decades back into the past to find the answers. I do like knowing the process of an investigation, but I am an action junkie and needed more mayhem with my murder. I enjoyed the journey and I am sure I will travel through the pages of another Peter Robinson novel in the near future. I love this quote: Hell is other people. I won the ARC paperback on Goodreads First Reads.
LaylaCD More than 1 year ago
A huge disappointment to a loyal fan who has read all of the Banks novels. The whole feel of the book is that robinson set up the situation then lost interest and was unable to find his way out. And the additional of a much younger stunningly beautiful love interest is way too self indulgent. I expected more.
VicG More than 1 year ago
Peter Robinson in his new book, “Children Of The Revolution” Book Twenty-One in the Inspector Banks series published by William Morrow. gives us a new mystery with Inspector Banks. From the back cover:  Multiple award-winning, New York Times and #1 internationally bestselling author Peter Robinson returns with Children of the Revolution, a superb tale of mystery and murder that takes acclaimed British Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks back to the early 1970s—a turbulent time of politics, change, and radical student activism – to solve a case that has been decades in the making. The body of a disgraced college lecturer is found on an abandoned railway line. In the four years since his dismissal for sexual misconduct, he’d been living like a hermit. So where did he get the 5,000 pounds found in his pocket? Leading the investigation, Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks begins to suspect that the victim’s past may be connected to his death. Forty years ago the dead man attended a university that was a hotbed of militant protest and divisive, bitter politics. And as the seasoned detective well knows, some grudges are never forgotten—or forgiven. Just as he’s about to break the case open, his superior warns him to back off. Yet Banks isn’t about to stop, even if it means risking his career. He’s certain there’s more to the mystery than meets the eye . . . and more skeletons to uncover before the case can finally be closed. I think the most difficult mystery to write is the one that takes place in the current time period but has its origins twenty or thirty years ago.  When I was growing up Ross MacDonald was the master at that kind of story.  Here comes Peter Robinson and he has given us exactly that kind of story.  To fully understand what is happening now Inspector Banks has to delve into the past and uncover the buried secrets.  ”Children Of The Revolution” is a police procedural taking place in London.  Mr. Robinson likes to tell an engaging mystery with wonderful characters.  This is my first Peter Robinson mystery but it will not be my last. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Partners In Crime.   I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
McGeeArch More than 1 year ago
As per usual Peter Robinson has written another great entry to the Inspector Banks series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly enjoyed this read. Not so engrossing that I had to do a binge read, but always a pleasure to look forward to picking it back up and reading each time.
Delphimo More than 1 year ago
I am really enjoying audiobooks, since I can knit as I listen. This story by Peter Robinson brings back memories of the 1970's, of course, I was not a flower child or hippie. Robinson incorporates music into every story and his choices remain eclectic. This story centers on the death of a ravaged and downtrodden professor, and the various people within his circle. Robinson paints a descriptive setting, along with vivid characters. The ending sends a lesson that sometimes the whole truth hurts more than a white lie, and Robinson must decide which route to follow. Many events of the story bring comic relief, as the music reminds the reader of the chorus in a Greek tragedy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Found little sympathy with the characters. Felt little for the victim or any of the suspects that interested me in their character. The lovely woman Banks was interested in was nebulous at best. Took me forever to finish it because of vague interest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
DCI Alan Banks, as usual, takes matters into his own hands in this rather convoluted novel which begins with the discovery of the body of Gavin Miller, a disgraced college professor. Subsequent investigation by Banks and his team uncovers many potential suspects, some from the victim’s college days 40 years before. The murdered man appeared to have been desperate, malnourished, and greatly in need of funds. And among the possible motives for his death were drugs and blackmail. With only theories to go on, the police begin a plodding check into Miller’s life, from his earliest days to his dismissal from his teaching post for sexual indiscretion. And all sorts of secrets begin to surface. The plot is an interesting one, but bogs down with various side issues and long-winded passages and dialogue. While the writing is the usual high standard of a Peter Robinson novel, it is slow reading because of these characteristics. And because of the depth of the police procedural as well, which seems never-ending. Nonetheless, as with all entries in this series, it is recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read just about every book in the Alan Banks series and would give all the others at least a 4 and more often 5 stars. This one was somehow less than satisfying as Banks and company re-interview the same people over and over, squeezing out one more drop of info each time. I couldn't decide whether to give this 2 stars or 3 but I'll go with the higher one since I still like the characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read many of the Inspector Banks books and have liked them all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Peter Robinson is a wonderful mystery writer. I have read all his books and enjoyed them all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I never did connect with the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
donnfo More than 1 year ago
This is another of Peter Robinson's wonderful books in a long series of crime-solving stories. This is a mystery set in the past, and all the better for it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in. May i help? She asks. Whats the plan? Who are you attacking first? Whos your leader. I need to talk to him/her. She hissed sharpening her claws on a stick.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago