BN.com Gift Guide

Children of the Revolution: The French, 1799-1914

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $9.92
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 61%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $9.92   
  • New (4) from $19.12   
  • Used (2) from $9.92   

Overview

For those who lived in the wake of the French Revolution, from the storming of the Bastille to Napoleon’s final defeat, its aftermath left a profound wound that no subsequent king, emperor, or president could heal. Children of the Revolution follows the ensuing generations who repeatedly tried and failed to come up with a stable regime after the trauma of 1789. The process encouraged fresh and often murderous oppositions between those who were for, and those who were against, the Revolution’s values. Bearing the scars of their country’s bloody struggle, and its legacy of deeply divided loyalties, the French lived the long nineteenth century in the shadow of the revolutionary age.

Despite the ghosts raised in this epic tale, Robert Gildea has written a richly engaging and provocative book. His is a strikingly unfamiliar France, a country with an often overwhelming gap between Paris and the provinces, a country torn apart by fratricidal hatreds and a tortured history of feminism, the site of political catastrophes and artistic triumphs, and a country that managed—despite a pervasive awareness of its own fall from grace—to fix itself squarely at the heart of modernity. Indeed, Gildea reveals how the collective recognition of the great costs of the Revolution galvanized the French to achieve consensus in a new republic and to integrate the tumultuous past into their sense of national identity. It was in this spirit that France’s young men went to the front in World War I with a powerful sense of national confidence and purpose.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Christian Science Monitor

At the heart of Robert Gildea's Children of the Revolution: The French, 1799–1914 is a vast project: not just a history of France during those astonishing years—from Napoleon to the killing fields of Verdun—but a history of the French themselves. Stimulating and highly readable...Robert Gildea has drawn very effectively on recent research in the areas he chooses to explore, and he presents his material in admirably lucid and entertaining prose. And, above all, he succeeds in one central task: showing just how surprisingly livable and creative France was during this golden century-long interval between two moments of horror. No wonder that so many remain nostalgic for it, and not just within the country's borders.
— Gail Russell Chaddock

The Nation

[An] erudite account of France's long nineteenth century...It is impossible to interpret the slaughter of a million and a half people as a triumph in any setting, but Gildea shows unforgettably a national identity winning out against all odds. It's a lengthy, complex saga, but he manages to sustain enough buoyancy in his prose to allow it to be read from beginning to end with interest and pleasure...One of the considerable strengths of Children of the Revolution is Gildea's eye for an individual example, anecdote or aphorism, combined with his comprehensive knowledge of the literature of nineteenth-century France...Gildea's book is a substantial contribution to understanding the individual nation that is France.
— Ruth Scurr

New Republic

Stimulating and highly readable...Robert Gildea has drawn very effectively on recent research in the areas he chooses to explore, and he presents his material in admirably lucid and entertaining prose. And, above all, he succeeds in one central task: showing just how surprisingly livable and creative France was during this golden century-long interval between two moments of horror. No wonder that so many remain nostalgic for it, and not just within the country's borders.
— David A. Bell

The Atlantic
With penetration and style, [Gildea] paints a complex portrait of a society geographically and temperamentally divided, constantly at war with itself, yet managing to forge a cohesive national identity at home and abroad.
Christian Science Monitor - Gail Russell Chaddock
At the heart of Robert Gildea's Children of the Revolution: The French, 1799–1914 is a vast project: not just a history of France during those astonishing years--from Napoleon to the killing fields of Verdun--but a history of the French themselves. Stimulating and highly readable...Robert Gildea has drawn very effectively on recent research in the areas he chooses to explore, and he presents his material in admirably lucid and entertaining prose. And, above all, he succeeds in one central task: showing just how surprisingly livable and creative France was during this golden century-long interval between two moments of horror. No wonder that so many remain nostalgic for it, and not just within the country's borders.
The Nation - Ruth Scurr
[An] erudite account of France's long nineteenth century...It is impossible to interpret the slaughter of a million and a half people as a triumph in any setting, but Gildea shows unforgettably a national identity winning out against all odds. It's a lengthy, complex saga, but he manages to sustain enough buoyancy in his prose to allow it to be read from beginning to end with interest and pleasure...One of the considerable strengths of Children of the Revolution is Gildea's eye for an individual example, anecdote or aphorism, combined with his comprehensive knowledge of the literature of nineteenth-century France...Gildea's book is a substantial contribution to understanding the individual nation that is France.
New Republic - David A. Bell
Stimulating and highly readable...Robert Gildea has drawn very effectively on recent research in the areas he chooses to explore, and he presents his material in admirably lucid and entertaining prose. And, above all, he succeeds in one central task: showing just how surprisingly livable and creative France was during this golden century-long interval between two moments of horror. No wonder that so many remain nostalgic for it, and not just within the country's borders.
The Nation
[An] erudite account of France's long nineteenth century...It is impossible to interpret the slaughter of a million and a half people as a triumph in any setting, but Gildea shows unforgettably a national identity winning out against all odds. It's a lengthy, complex saga, but he manages to sustain enough buoyancy in his prose to allow it to be read from beginning to end with interest and pleasure...One of the considerable strengths of Children of the Revolution is Gildea's eye for an individual example, anecdote or aphorism, combined with his comprehensive knowledge of the literature of nineteenth-century France...Gildea's book is a substantial contribution to understanding the individual nation that is France.
— Ruth Scurr
New Republic
Stimulating and highly readable...Robert Gildea has drawn very effectively on recent research in the areas he chooses to explore, and he presents his material in admirably lucid and entertaining prose. And, above all, he succeeds in one central task: showing just how surprisingly livable and creative France was during this golden century-long interval between two moments of horror. No wonder that so many remain nostalgic for it, and not just within the country's borders.
— David A. Bell
Christian Science Monitor
At the heart of Robert Gildea's Children of the Revolution: The French, 1799–1914 is a vast project: not just a history of France during those astonishing years--from Napoleon to the killing fields of Verdun--but a history of the French themselves. There's a sea of books on the French Revolution and its fallout. There's another sea of books on French cultural history--its edgy Parisian salons, its sun-drenched villages in Provence. It's rare to try to fuse both, rarer still to do it well. He does...It's a great read.
— Gail Russell Chaddock
Publishers Weekly

The French Revolution's cries of "liberty, fraternity, and equality" reverberated throughout Europe and America. Yet in France, as Oxford historian Gildea (Marianne in Chains) demonstrates in this elegant political and cultural history, the consequences of the revolution were far more ambiguous: its mixed legacy included "hope for a new day" as well as "anarchy, bloodletting and despotism." Chronicling five generations, Gildea discovers diverse responses, including opposition and a longing for the monarchy in the first generation. The second generation after the revolution-those born around 1800-longed for liberty, equality and fraternity without the terror and dictatorship that called into question the revolutionary project. The third generation, born around 1830, was more pragmatic than ideological, but did develop a secular morality that challenged the political power of the church. Later in the 19th century, the revolution sharply divided the French Republic, but by WWI, both opponents and proponents laid aside their differences and fought side by side for France's greatness and unity. Invoking writers and thinkers from Musset to Flaubert to Péguy, Gildea's spellbinding book offers a challenging new portrait of the long-term impact of the French Revolution. Maps. (Sept.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

In this thoroughly researched work of scholarship, Gildea (history, Oxford Univ.) argues that the French Revolution spawned two conflicting ideologies that dominated the course of French history from 1800 to 1914. Through the lives of five generations of French citizens, Gildea elucidates the seemingly irrevocable differences between these two opposing camps. The Monarchists viewed the Revolution as an abhorrent rebellion against legitimate authority, while the Republicans embraced the Revolution as the unfettering of human potential. This conflict became manifest through the turbulent events of 1815, 1848, 1851, and 1871 when French blood was shed to assert the conflicting legacies of the Revolution. Gildea (Marianne in Chains: Daily Life in the Heart of France During the German Occupation ) maintains that this conflict permeated the entire fabric of French society, and it was only the unifying crisis of the Great War that finally ended the turbulent debate over the legitimate legacy of the Revolution. This thesis should generate controversy since historians like Julian Jackson (France: The Dark Years 1941-44 ) maintain that the divisive legacy of the Revolution survived beyond World War I and the conflict included Bonapartists, Socialists, and Communists as well as monarchists and republicans. Still, Gildea's book is a worthy addition to all comprehensive modern French history collections.-Jim Doyle, Rome, GA

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674057241
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 10/30/2010
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 973,400
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Gildea is Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford, and the author of Marianne in Chains, the winner of the Wolfson Prize for history.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Maps

Introduction The Children of the Revolution 1

Pt. 1 France, 1799-1870

1 Revolution or Consensus? French Politics, 1799-1870 19

2 Discovering France 66

3 A Divided Society 91

4 Religion and Revolution 118

5 'Le Malheur d'etre femme' 141

6 Artistic Genius and Bourgeois Culture 168

7 The French in a Foreign Mirror 199

Pt. 2 France, 1870-1914

8 War and Commune, 1870-1871 229

9 Consensus Found: French Politics, 1870-1914 246

10 Reconciling Paris and the Provinces 289

11 Class Cohesion 311

12 Secularization and Religious Revival 337

13 Feminism and its Frustrations 364

14 Modernism and Mass Culture 390

15 Rebuilding the Nation 410

Conclusion: 1914 437

Notes 444

Index 521

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)