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Children We Remember
     

Children We Remember

4.5 2
by Abells
 

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Through moving photographs from the Yad Vashem Archives in Jerusalem, Israel, archivist Chana Byers Abells has created an unforgettable essay about the children who lived and died during the Holocaust. While it is a story of death and loss, it is also a story of courage and endurance, a story to be shared with today's children.

Overview

Through moving photographs from the Yad Vashem Archives in Jerusalem, Israel, archivist Chana Byers Abells has created an unforgettable essay about the children who lived and died during the Holocaust. While it is a story of death and loss, it is also a story of courage and endurance, a story to be shared with today's children.

Editorial Reviews

Elie Wiesel
Look at these children. Look at their faces. They will break your heart.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Powerful. Sobering. Harrowing. Stark. These are but some of the descriptions for the reactions evoked by this pictorial account of the Nazi era as suffered by Jewish children. Originally published by Kar-Ben, Abell's book uses a chronological organization, beginning with ```Before the Nazis . . . some children lived in towns like this,'' showing ordinary settings. Later, children are seen hungry in the streets; one is shot while being held by a woman. The pictures of happier times, the naming of specific children who died, and an economy of words increase the ghastly impact. Total despair does not reign; some children survive. Young readers will feel empoweredalmost saved through identificationby these children's strategies for rescue, hiding and escape. The book is meant to be shared with someone who can explain the images; its message is one that richly deserves a wide audience. (All ages
Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
This pictorial account uses a chronological organization, beginning with "Before the Nazis... some children lived in towns like this," showing ordinary settings. Later, children roam hungry in the streets; one is shot while being held by a woman. "The book is meant to be shared with someone who can explain the images," wrote PW. "Its message is one that richly deserves a wide audience." Ages 8-12. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
This photographic essay, first published by Kar-Ben in 1983, written on the Holocaust is part of the movement to introduce this horrific 20th century event to young children. Made up of photographs from the archives of Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust museum, the book includes pictures of prewar children attending schools and synagogues, playing with their friends, and living ordinary lives. Then the reader is able to see the influence of the Nazis and when they came how everything changed. The children had to sew yellow stars on their clothing, they weren't allowed to attend school, they didn't have enough to eat, and eventually, many of them were killed. Although the book ends with the more hopeful information that some children were rescued, the photographs remain profoundly disturbing, especially for the very young child the book seems to be addressing. (Although the recommended range is 8 to 12, the book "looks" much younger.) One must ask what is to be gained by presenting the Holocaust and its appalling effects on children to children, especially children younger than middle-school students. How can they relate to such murderous rage, and what are they to do with their natural fear? The Children We Remember is handsomely produced, but represents an alarming trend. 2002 (orig. 1986), Greenwillow,
— Miriam Rinn <%ISBN%>0688063713
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
April 7th is Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day; a day that stands in tribute to the six million Jewish dead. This book is a powerful telling of how children suffered and died in the Holocaust. There are few words and the powerful photographs demand discussion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688063719
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/18/1986
Edition description:
1st edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
9.81(w) x 9.29(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range:
7 - 9 Years

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Children We Remember 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
JennGrrl More than 1 year ago
This is a great book for very young children. There's nothing graphic to worry about. The story is extremely simple, and really for extremely young children, but the photographs are really what the book is about and bring home the Holocaust for anyone.
momandteacher More than 1 year ago
What a fantastic book to use in a classroom! With minimal (yet very poignant) text, this book tells the story of the Holocaust through its pictures. Instead of being told how to feel about the treatment of Jews during the Holocaust, their story is told through the pictures of the children affected by it. This is a must-read for teachers, parents, middle schoolers and high schoolers alike!