Children Who Kill: Profiles of Teen and Pre-teen Killers

Children Who Kill: Profiles of Teen and Pre-teen Killers

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by Carol Anne Davis
     
 

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Why would two young boys abduct, torture and kill a toddler? What makes a teenage girl plot with her classmates to kill her own father? Traditionally, society is used to regarding children as harmless — but for some the age of innocence is short-lived, messy and ultimately murderous. Children Who Kill is a comprehensive new study of juvenile homicide. Carol

Overview

Why would two young boys abduct, torture and kill a toddler? What makes a teenage girl plot with her classmates to kill her own father? Traditionally, society is used to regarding children as harmless — but for some the age of innocence is short-lived, messy and ultimately murderous. Children Who Kill is a comprehensive new study of juvenile homicide. Carol Anne Davis sets out to explore this disturbing subject using in-depth case studies of thirteen killers aged between ten and seventeen. Exclusive interviews with experts offer an invaluable insight into the psychology behind these atrocities and a hard-hitting look at the role of society in an area too shocking to ignore

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780749006938
Publisher:
Allison & Busby, Limited
Publication date:
12/14/2011
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
734,449
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 7.10(h) x 1.18(d)

Meet the Author

CAROL ANNE DAVIS was born in Dundee, moved to Edinburgh in her twenties and now lives in the south of England. She left school at fifteen and was everything from an artist's model to an editorial assistant before going to university. Her MA degree included criminology and was followed by a postgraduate diploma in Adult and Community Education. Now a full-time writer, she is the author of four crime novels and non-fiction books including Women Who Kill and Children Who Kill.

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Children Who Kill: Profiles of Teen and Pre-Teen Killers 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Snarky More than 1 year ago
I was disappointed with this book because the writer clearly did not research enough of the facts. In the case of Wendy Gardner and James Evans, the author goes easy on James Evans, completely ignoring his violent temper and behavioral problems. The writer pins most of the blame on Wendy Gardner, who did not force James Evans against his will to murder someone. The writer completely left out how James had tortured animals, beaten a car with a baseball bat, picked fights with people, stabbed a boy with a hemostat, and even grabbed Wendy by her throat, threatening to rip out her throat if she ever left him. The author also claims that a 'layperson' would label James as a sociopath or a psychopath. But the truth is, professional psychiatrists are the ones who had diagnosed James as being a sociopath who'd kill again if given the chance. Anyone who can kill someone with his bare hands and then push his girlfriend into having sex near the dead body is a sociopath. I don't care how many gifts James bought her or claimed to have loved her. He is clearly a dangerous person who confused obsession as love, and he took a life, and he justifies his own actions in his own twisted mind. James also kicked the dead body afterwards, and bragged about how powerful killing made him feel. Instead, the author wrote about how 'tearful' and 'traumatized' James was after the murder. She didn't write about how James wanted to have sex near the dead body and enjoyed taunting Wendy about her dead grandmother's body being near them. James has had no remorse for killing Betty Gardner, and that is also something about James' character that cannot be blamed on Wendy Gardner. That is the James Evans that the writer failed to include in this book, and paints Wendy out to be a mastermind, and James as a loverboy who just wanted to help. The family of James Evans had downplayed how violent they knew James to be. They blamed others for his actions and made excuses for his behavior in a smoke-screen after he had committed murder. But neighbors know how James really was. My own family lived right on the same street as Wendy Gardner. Many people knew about the abuse and how Wendy and James were not Romeo and Juliet. They were two very troubled kids who developed an obsessive relationship that would not have survived. Wendy, in fact, had attempted to break up with James, but he always manipulated or threatened Wendy into staying with him. After the murder, Wendy was afraid of James, and he refused to let her out of sight. There's no good reason for anyone to doubt that, especially since she had just turned 13 and only dated James about 4 months. Many 13 year old girls would probably have been equally as terrified and compliant in such a situation. Of course, being abusive does not necessarily mean someone deserves to be murdered by some punk. Being emotionally disturbed does not give someone a licence to kill. These factors explain how it can happen, but it doesn't excuse it. Wendy and James didn't even really know each other as well as they believed they did, and now they are done forever. She has moved on with her life, putting James and everything in the past. There were many bad factors that went into that horrible crime, and people always want to play the blame game. When you make the decision of putting your hands on another person and take a person's life, that is what makes all the difference between talking about it - and doing it without remorse.