Chilis to Chutneys

Chilis to Chutneys

by Neelam Batra
     
 

A ginger-scented hamburger on the grill. Steaming pasta redolent of eggplant and fenugreek. Stir-fried garlic with the pungent aroma of chopped cilantro. In Chilis to Chutneys author Neelam Batra takes familiar American fare and reinterprets it using her Indian spice cupboard and cooking know-how. Try French Fries with Chaat Masala, Pizza Naan with Green

Overview

A ginger-scented hamburger on the grill. Steaming pasta redolent of eggplant and fenugreek. Stir-fried garlic with the pungent aroma of chopped cilantro. In Chilis to Chutneys author Neelam Batra takes familiar American fare and reinterprets it using her Indian spice cupboard and cooking know-how. Try French Fries with Chaat Masala, Pizza Naan with Green cilantro Chutney and Grilled Seekh Kebab Rolls, or Basmati "Risotto" with Wild Mushrooms for new taste-tingling twists on old favorites.

She also shows how traditional Indian preparations can make the transition to the American table. Think of curry as nothing more than a kind of stew. Use piquant chutneys as you would salsas to serve on the side with fish or chicken. And introduce the taste of the tandooe oven to your next barbecue with Grilled Ginger and Lemon Chicken Drumsticks and Flame Roasted Corn on the Cob.

Two hundred recipes in all, Chilis to Chutneys will add a welcoming zing to your everyday cooking.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688156909
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/28/1998
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
7.83(w) x 9.58(h) x 1.04(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Basic Wild Rice Pilaf

Wild rice is not a true rice but a long-grain aquatic grass seed. And it is not wild, as the name suggests. It is cultivated in paddies. Nutritionally speaking, wild rice compares to brown rice and is rich in protein and vitamin B.

1-1/2 cups wild rice
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 bay leaves
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
1 cup thoroughly washed, finally chopped leek whites
1 teaspoon minced garlic
41/2 cups of water
3/4 teaspoon salt, or to your taste
Chopped cilantro (fresh coriander) or parsley leaves for garnish

Put the rice in a large sieve and wash thoroughly under running water. Set aside.

In a large saucepan, heat the oil over moderately high heat and cook the bay leaves, stirring, for a few seconds. Stir in the cumin seeds, which should sizzle until they turn golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook until all the water is absorbed and the rice is safe, 50 to 60 minutes.

Remove to platter, garnish with chopped cilantro, and serve.

Meet the Author

Neelam Batra is a native of India and learned to cook at her mother's side. She teaches cooking at Santa Monica College and in her home in Santa Monica, California. She is also the author of the The Indian Vegetarian.

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