Chilling Stars: A Cosmic View of Climate Change

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New evidence based on Henrik Svensmark's scientific research prompts questions to be raised about the role of man-made carbon dioxide in global warming. The sun, stars, and cosmic rays have often been overlooked, but in this radical new book they are placed center stage in the climate change debate.

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Overview

New evidence based on Henrik Svensmark's scientific research prompts questions to be raised about the role of man-made carbon dioxide in global warming. The sun, stars, and cosmic rays have often been overlooked, but in this radical new book they are placed center stage in the climate change debate.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781840468663
  • Publisher: Icon Books, Ltd. UK
  • Publication date: 8/25/2008
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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  • Posted January 16, 2010

    Very original contribution to the debate about climate change

    Having read The Weather Makers by Tim Flannery and The Skeptical Environmentalist by Bjorn Lomborg, I thought I read about both sides of the debate on climate change. The Chilling Stars presents a completely different take on climate change; that it has always occurred and the major driver of warming and cooling is the amount of cosmic radiation that enters the Earth's atmosphere. This cosmic radiation seeds clouds, which has a chilling effect everywhere except Antarctica, which is warmed and which the carbon dioxide/greenhouse theory cannot explain. The amount of cosmic radiation that reaches Earth is due to the strength of the Sun's magnetic field and a good indicator of a strong magnetic field are lots of Sun spots and when it is weak there is very little Sun spot activity. This book bounces deftly from geology, astronomy, meteorology and archeology. The ideas are very clearly explained. Very well worth the read.

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  • Posted September 6, 2009

    Well written, compelling view of climate science

    A less explored aspect of climate science leading to a breakthrough in the understanding of cloud formation and its possible effect on global temperatures. A must read for those interested in the science side of the climate change issue without the bother of political views.

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  • Posted October 31, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Splendid account of the reaons for climate change

    Henrik Svensmark, director of the Centre of Sun-Climate Research at the Danish National Space Centre, and Nigel Calder, the well-known science writer, have produced a challenging book on climate change.<BR/><BR/>When stars die, they do so in supernova explosions that emit cosmic rays, which create ions, which form clouds. Low clouds ¿ less than 3000 metres above the surface - keep the planet cool. The less active the sun is, the more cosmic rays get through to the earth, and so the more clouds there are to cool the earth. <BR/><BR/>The Danish National Space Centre¿s SKY experiment showed how cosmic rays set free electrons which then catalysed the clubbing together of sulphuric acid molecules, the most important source of condensation nuclei. These cosmic rays have varied since the world began; their influx depends largely on where the earth is in the galaxy in our orbit around the centre of the Milky Way. When the earth is in dark regions with few stars where the rays are scarce, the climate is warm. When the earth is in bright regions where the rays are intense, the climate is cool.<BR/><BR/>The medieval warm period of 1000-1300 was followed by the cool periods of 1300-60 and 1450-1540, and a worse one, the little ice age of 1645-1715, then another cool period in 1790-1820. The peak of the little ice age was 1700, which coincided with the Maunder Minimum, when the sun¿s magnetic activity was very low, reducing its ability to shield the earth from cosmic rays.<BR/><BR/>In the last century, the sun¿s magnetic field doubled in strength, reducing the cosmic rays and so the clouds, thus heating up the earth by 0.70C from 1900 to 2005, 70% of the 20th century¿s warming. The authors predict that global warming in this century is likely to be at the low end of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change¿s forecast of a 1.80C-40C rise by 2100.<BR/><BR/>Indeed, temperatures have not risen since 2001, even though global CO2 emissions have been rising faster than ever. Also, the Antarctic¿s area of sea ice grew by 8% between 1978 and 2005.

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