Chimpanzee Rescue: Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife

Overview

From the book:
"We need to give them the respect they deserve, as our closest living relatives in the animal kingdom."

Long used in mass media entertainment, chimpanzees are recognized and loved by people of all ages. In spite of their popularity, chimpanzees are threatened by a disappearing habitat, poaching and disease. In 1984, demand for lab chimpanzees skyrocketed when scientists discovered that ...

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Overview

From the book:
"We need to give them the respect they deserve, as our closest living relatives in the animal kingdom."

Long used in mass media entertainment, chimpanzees are recognized and loved by people of all ages. In spite of their popularity, chimpanzees are threatened by a disappearing habitat, poaching and disease. In 1984, demand for lab chimpanzees skyrocketed when scientists discovered that chimpanzees could be infected with HIV. Only four years later, the chimpanzee's status moved from threatened to endangered.

Chimpanzee Rescue explains the innovative strategies conservationists are using to prevent its demise.

While much is being accomplished through increased public awareness and conservation management, much needs to be done. The recent Ebola outbreak, a deadly virus that also affects humans, devastated chimp populations in central Africa. It's a grim reminder of how biologically similar our species are.

About the Firefly Animal Rescue series:

The Firefly Animal Rescue identifies endangered and threatened species and what is being done to protect them. Combining lively, accessible text and stunning color photographs, each book provides a detailed overview of the species, describing its characteristics, behavior, habits, physiology and more.

"These attractive books are a call to action... fascinating readable accounts."
- School Library Journal

"Succinct introductions to the science and practice of wildlife conservation... written in accessible, lively language."
- Booklist

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Editorial Reviews

Green Teacher - Debra Bridgman
Award winning... With beautiful photography and inspiring examples of individuals passionately devoted to wildlife conservation, these are excellent resource for the classroom or school library.
Library Media Connection - Ruie Chehak
[review of series:] Anyone interested in learning more about endangered animals will find these books fascinating... This series will make a strong addition to any school library.
Wildlife Conservation
Young readers will be inspired by the leading scientists and conservationists in the field... who are working to help chimpanzees survive.
Resource Links - Janet Toope
Very well organized... numerous photographs serve the dual purpose of adding visual appeal and bringing the text to life... a valuable resource in any school library.
Canadian Materials - Gillian Richardson
One can't read this book without admiring the dedication of those people working to save another creature on the brink of extinction.
Science Books and Films - Dorothy A. Billows
Sets the stage for stories of hope through human actions... a good primer of information about chimpanzees and bonobos.
Children's Literature
What impact do the disappearing rainforest trees have on the chimpanzee population? First, the shrinking African forests encourage chimp wars by forcing neighboring chimp communities to live close together. Second, shrinking African forests isolate the animals into islands of forests surrounded by farmland and open grassland. The chimps will not leave the trees to cross to open lands, so females must stay home and breed with close relatives. This inbreeding produces off spring that are small, weaker, and more disease prone. This nonfiction text, part of the "Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife" series, will enlighten readers about the connection between a chimpanzee's environment and their survival as a species. The book includes beautiful photography, easy to read sections with excellent supporting text from various sources, and a listing of organizations that are protecting the chimpanzee. The book is a perfect choice for an eighth or ninth grade science classroom or library. 2004, Firefly Books, Ages 12 to 15.
—Mindy Hardwick
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-These well-written titles introduce endangered or threatened species, describe how and why they are in danger, and explain what efforts are being made to protect them. In each book, a time line of conservation efforts with regard to the creatures' environments, research, and the law is included. Illustrated fast-fact sections provide information on name, size, life span, reproduction, diet, and more. Stunning, full-color photographs bring each species to life and depict a number of individuals in the field and laboratory working to save these animals. Each book also examines what the future looks like (bleak), and includes information on "How You Can Help." This last section lists contact information for conservation clubs and organizations. Each book includes an excellent index. These attractive titles are a call to action.-Cynde Suite, Bartow County Library System, Adairsville, GA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552979082
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/2/2004
  • Series: Firefly Animal Rescue Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 1,227,213
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Patricia Bow is a former librarian who studied journalism.

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Read an Excerpt

Our Cousins, The Chimps

Six or seven million years ago, a common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees roamed across Africa. Although evolution has led us along separate paths, humans are still closer to chimps than to any other mammal. Scientists look to the chimps for clues as they explore how our remote ancestors lived. No wonder the chimpanzee holds a special place in our imagination.

A century ago, as many as two million chimpanzees inhabited Africa. Today, probably fewer than 200,000 remain in the wild. Some estimates put the figure as low as 110,000. Up to 3,500 chimps live in captivity, including nearly 1,200 in zoos. The animals are extinct in five of the 25 countries where they once lived, and reduced to scattered remnants in half a dozen others.

Chimpanzees and the closely related bonobos, along with gorillas and orangutans, are great apes. They are part of the primate order of mammals, which also includes humans, monkeys, and about 200 smaller species. But all four subspecies of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the single bonobo species (Pan paniscus) are endangered.

Still, despite all that human beings have done to chimpanzees, the animals are not yet doomed. It's often said that when you look into the eyes of a chimpanzee, you can't help but feel a flash of recognition. Thousands of scientists, wildlife officials and zoo and sanctuary workers have looked into those eyes. Their dedication and hard work -- along with a lot of help from animal lovers around the world -- may be enough to keep our closest cousins alive.

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Table of Contents

Our cousins, the chimps
Where do chimpanzees live?
The story so far
Shrinking forests
Love and war in the rainforest
ON THE FRONTLINES: Greener pastures
AT WORK: Lee White
Too close for comfort
Dangerous company
ON THE FRONTLINES: Avoiding the traps
AT WORK: Vernon Reynolds
Apes on the menu
Shutting down the hunt
Primate peacemakers
ON THE FRONTLINES: The heart of Bonobo country
AT WORK: Inogwabini Bila-Isia
Chimps behind bars
Life under the big top
Setting them free
ON THE FRONTLINES: Return of the Chimps
AT WORK: Aliette Jamart
Blurring the line
ON THE FRONTLINES: Bailing out the Air Force chimps
What is the chimpanzee's future?
Fast facts
How you can help
Index
Photo credits
Author's note

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First Chapter

Our Cousins, The Chimps

Six or seven million years ago, a common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees roamed across Africa. Although evolution has led us along separate paths, humans are still closer to chimps than to any other mammal. Scientists look to the chimps for clues as they explore how our remote ancestors lived. No wonder the chimpanzee holds a special place in our imagination.

A century ago, as many as two million chimpanzees inhabited Africa. Today, probably fewer than 200,000 remain in the wild. Some estimates put the figure as low as 110,000. Up to 3,500 chimps live in captivity, including nearly 1,200 in zoos. The animals are extinct in five of the 25 countries where they once lived, and reduced to scattered remnants in half a dozen others.

Chimpanzees and the closely related bonobos, along with gorillas and orangutans, are great apes. They are part of the primate order of mammals, which also includes humans, monkeys, and about 200 smaller species. But all four subspecies of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the single bonobo species (Pan paniscus) are endangered.

Still, despite all that human beings have done to chimpanzees, the animals are not yet doomed. It's often said that when you look into the eyes of a chimpanzee, you can't help but feel a flash of recognition. Thousands of scientists, wildlife officials and zoo and sanctuary workers have looked into those eyes. Their dedication and hard work — along with a lot of help from animal lovers around the world — may be enough to keep our closest cousins alive.

Read More Show Less

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