China, During the War and Since the Peace [NOOK Book]

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PREFACE. Vll calculate the extent of the forthcoming revolutions in the channels of national and commercial intercourse. But it may be predicted that a British colony with twenty-five thousand Chinese subjects, in sight of the ...
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China, During the War and Since the Peace

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
PREFACE. Vll calculate the extent of the forthcoming revolutions in the channels of national and commercial intercourse. But it may be predicted that a British colony with twenty-five thousand Chinese subjects, in sight of the south coast of China, is destined to play a part in the drama of the future. The two concluding chapters of the last volume, on the Indo-Chinese nations, may prove interesting at the present time. The chapter on Japan was already in the press, when the intelligence of an American mission to that country, of five vessels of war, reached London. Whatever may be the result of this undertaking, nothing important is likely to be gained by mere negociation, as the United States had already, in 1846, about as strong a force in the bay of Je"do, including a ship of 90 guns, under Commodore Biddle. It is possible that the present exclusively navalarmament may prove sufficient to carry out strong measures; but its amount is very different from our own seventy vessels of war and transports, with twelve thousand fighting men, before the walls of Nanking in 1842. If not sufficient, however, it may lead to something farther, from either the same or some other quarter. Vol. ii. page 287. This expedition is an opportune confirmation of the views and expectations entertained in the two chapters on the Indo- Chinese nations, who certainly will not be allowed much longer to remain in a state of avowed hostility to the rest of the world ; — more especially Japan, which fires on ships in their necessity, and exhibits shipwrecked mariners in cages, preparatory to a cruel death. With them, at least, the time has arrived, pacis imponere morem. It remains for the rest of the civilised PREFACE. world to wish the United States all success, and to expect that t...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940024174876
  • Publisher: Longman, Brown, Green , and Longmans
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1852 volume
  • File size: 373 KB

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PREFACE. Vll calculate the extent of the forthcoming revolutions in the channels of national and commercial intercourse. But it may be predicted that a British colony with twenty-five thousand Chinese subjects, in sight of the south coast of China, is destined to play a part in the drama of the future. The two concluding chapters of the last volume, on the Indo-Chinese nations, may prove interesting at the present time. The chapter on Japan was already in the press, when the intelligence of an American mission to that country, of five vessels of war, reached London. Whatever may be the result of this undertaking, nothing important is likely to be gained by mere negociation, as the United States had already, in 1846, about as strong a force in the bay of Je"do, including a ship of 90 guns, under Commodore Biddle. It is possible that the present exclusively navalarmament may prove sufficient to carry out strong measures; but its amount is very different from our own seventy vessels of war and transports, with twelve thousand fighting men, before the walls of Nanking in 1842. If not sufficient, however, it may lead to something farther, from either the same or some other quarter. Vol. ii. page 287. This expedition is an opportune confirmation of the views and expectations entertained in the two chapters on the Indo- Chinese nations, who certainly will not be allowed much longer to remain in a state of avowed hostility to the rest of the world ; more especially Japan, which fires on ships in their necessity, and exhibits shipwrecked mariners in cages, preparatory to a cruel death. With them, at least, the time has arrived, pacis imponere morem. It remains for the rest of the civilisedPREFACE. world to wish the United States all success, and to expect that t...
Read More Show Less

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