China Pop: How Soap Operas, Tabloids, and Bestsellers Are Transforming a Culture

Overview

Born in China, Jianying Zha now spends part of the year there and the rest in the United States. From her constant contact (and in many cases friendship) with a dynamic group of young novelists, filmmakers, and artists in China, she is able to describe a wide range of developments largely unknown to Western readers: the careful planning of television soap operas to placate popular unrest after Tiananmen, the growth of sex tabloids and pornography, the new generation of entrepreneurs successfully bringing to the ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (43) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $9.95   
  • Used (40) from $1.99   
China Pop: How Soap Operas, Tabloids and Bestsellers Are Transforming a Culture

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$15.95 List Price

Overview

Born in China, Jianying Zha now spends part of the year there and the rest in the United States. From her constant contact (and in many cases friendship) with a dynamic group of young novelists, filmmakers, and artists in China, she is able to describe a wide range of developments largely unknown to Western readers: the careful planning of television soap operas to placate popular unrest after Tiananmen, the growth of sex tabloids and pornography, the new generation of entrepreneurs successfully bringing to the mainland the consumer techniques of Hong Kong and the West, and the politics behind the censorship and commercial success of the film directors Chen Kaige (Farewell My Concubine) and Zhang Yimou (Ju Dou and Raise the Red Lantern). The extraordinary transformation of China comes alive in these intriguing and enjoyable portraits. We see once-committed Communists becoming cynical capitalists, the regime seeking to control and manipulate the new media, and the confusion in the younger generation as to which values to follow. Writing from years of first-hand experience in China, Jianying Zha gives us a fascinating look at the transformation of contemporary China.

Written by a Chinese American journalist, China Pop is an original look at the ways in which contemporary China has been changed by its media. Soap operas were planned to placate unrest after Tiananmen, and sex tabloids and pornography are growing. Zha provides readers with a fascinating example of the way modern media are transforming the non-Western world.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zha, who was born and raised in Beijing, examines the ways in which the proliferation of pop culture and mass media is changing traditional Chinese society. (Apr.)
Library Journal
As one who fundamentally believes that culture, not economics, will "save" China, Zha (a Chinese journalist who now lives in Chicago and works for the Center for Transcultural Studies) writes about how popular culture has developed in Beijing, China's cultural capital. She discusses the major individuals involved in the production of the nation's most popular soap opera, Yearning; the development of contemporary Chinese architecture; the production of such award-winning movies as Farewell My Concubine and Raise the Red Lantern; the transformation of the Ministry of Culture's China Culture Gazette; pervasive corruption in the journalistic world; the wholesale promotion of the novel The Abandoned Capital; and, from Hong Kong, the proliferation of the avante-garde via the CIM investment company. Much of what Zha discusses is supported in other recent accounts (e.g., Frank Viviano's Dispatches from the Pacific Century, LJ 4/1/93; Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's China Wakes, LJ 7/94; and Orville Schell's Mandate of Heaven, LJ 8/94). However, since her stated intention is to portray China in a "minute fashion," the result is that the book reads more like an extended gossip column than a serious analytical work. An optional purchase.-Peggy Spitzer Christoff, Oak Park, Ill
Booknews
A tale of China's "new mandarins," describing developments largely unknown to Western readers: the careful planning of television soap operas to placate popular unrest after Tiananmen Square, the growth of pornography, a new generation of entrepreneurs importing the consumer techniques of Hong Kong and the West, and the politics behind both the censorship and the commercial success of Chinese filmmakers. The author, a journalist who divides her time between China and the United States, charts the progress of a nation's transformation. Portions appeared in different form in magazines including The Voice Literary Supplement, The Nation, and The Antioch Review. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565842502
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 4/28/1996
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.17 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)