China Rising: Peace, Power, and Order in East Asia

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.37
(Save 65%)
Est. Return Date: 06/15/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$15.48
(Save 35%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 91%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $17.99   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   

Overview

Throughout the past three decades East Asia has seen more peace and stability than at any time since the Opium Wars of 1839-1841. Durgaing this period China has rapidly emerged as a major regional power, averaging over nine percent economic growth per year since the introduction of its market reforms in 1978. Foreign businesses have flocked to invest in China, and Chinese exports have begun to flood the world. China is modernizing its military, has joined numerous regional and international institutions, and plays an increasingly visible role in international politics. In response to this growth, other states in East Asia have moved to strengthen their military, economic, and diplomatic relations with China. But why have these countries accommodated rather than balanced China's rise?

David C. Kang believes certain preferences and beliefs are responsible for maintaining stability in East Asia. Kang's research shows how East Asian states have grown closer to China, with little evidence that the region is rupturing. Rising powers present opportunities as well as threats, and the economic benefits and military threat China poses for its regional neighbors are both potentially huge; however, East Asian states see substantially more advantage than danger in China's rise, making the region more stable, not less. Furthermore, although East Asian states do not unequivocally welcome China in all areas, they are willing to defer judgment regarding what China wants and what its role in East Asia will become. They believe that a strong China stabilizes East Asia, while a weak China tempts other states to try to control the region.

Many scholars downplay the role of ideas and suggest that a rising China will be a destabilizing force in the region, but Kang's provocative argument reveals the flaws in contemporary views of China and the international relations of East Asia and offers a new understanding of the importance of sound U.S. policy in the region.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Times Higher Education Supplement - Steve Tsang
[A] provocative book.
Globe & Mail - Charles Burton
[Kang] provocatively contends that China's aspirational rise will make the East Asian region more stable.
Political Science Quarterly - Andrew Scobell
A refreshing read... should be required reading for everyone concerned about the rise of China or East Asian international relations.
Far Eastern Economic Review - John Frankenstein
Any serious student of Asia will find China Rising challenging, and will give that reader a good deal to consider—and perhaps rethink.
Pacific Affairs - Robert E. Bedeski
A very useful guide to international relations in the region today.
Korean Studies - Jungmin Seo
China Rising is genuinely exceptional.
East Asia - Stefan Fergus
China Rising offers an alternative approach to international relations in East Asia that ought to stimulate debate.
Times Higher Education Supplement
[A] provocative book.

— Steve Tsang

Globe & Mail
[Kang] provocatively contends that China's aspirational rise will make the East Asian region more stable.

— Charles Burton

Political Science Quarterly
A refreshing read... should be required reading for everyone concerned about the rise of China or East Asian international relations.

— Andrew Scobell, Texas A&M University

Far Eastern Economic Review
Any serious student of Asia will find China Rising challenging, and will give that reader a good deal to consider—and perhaps rethink.

— John Frankenstein

CHOICE
Clearly written and cogently argued, this book is essential reading for all audiences.
Pacific Affairs
A very useful guide to international relations in the region today.

— Robert E. Bedeski

Military Review
A refreshing, persuasive, and provocative book.
Korean Studies
China Rising is genuinely exceptional.

— Jungmin Seo

East Asia
China Rising offers an alternative approach to international relations in East Asia that ought to stimulate debate.

— Stefan Fergus

Choice
Clearly written and cogently argued, this book is essential reading for all audiences.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231141895
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 12/23/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

David C. Kang is a professor of international relations and business at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Crony Capitalism: Corruption and Development in South Korea and the Philippines and, with Victor Cha, Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies. He is a regular media commentator, and has published opinion pieces in the New York Times and the Washington Post. Kang is also a frequent consultant to both multinational corporations and U.S. government agencies, including the CIA, National Intelligence Council, and State Department.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Pt. I The Puzzle and the Argument 1

1 The Puzzle and China's Amazing Rise 3

2 Power, Interests, and Identity in East Asian International Relations, 1300 to 1900 18

3 Describing East Asia: Alignment Strategies Toward China 50

Pt. II East Asia Responds to China 77

4 China: Identity, Sovereignty, and Taiwan 79

5 South Korea: Embracing Interdependence in Search of Security 104

6 Southeast Asia: Accommodating China's Rise 126

7 Japan: A Normal Identity 153

Pt. III East Asia and the United States 183

8 The Role of the United States in East Asia 185

9 Conclusions and Implications 197

Notes 205

Selected Bibliography 253

Index 263

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)