BN.com Gift Guide

China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power

Overview

The definitive book on China's uneasy transformation into an economic and political superpower by two Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporters. An insightful and thought-provoking analysis of daily life in China, China Wakes is an exemplary work of reportage. 16 pages of photos.

A definitive book on China's rise to economic and political power by the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters of The New York Times. Taking readers inside the world's largest country at a ...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.61
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (145) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $5.79   
  • Used (136) from $1.99   
China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

The definitive book on China's uneasy transformation into an economic and political superpower by two Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporters. An insightful and thought-provoking analysis of daily life in China, China Wakes is an exemplary work of reportage. 16 pages of photos.

A definitive book on China's rise to economic and political power by the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters of The New York Times. Taking readers inside the world's largest country at a time of seismic change, Kristof and WuDunn encapsulate in human terms the exhilarating and terrifying paradoxes of China today. Photos throughout.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Nick Kristof's and Sheryl WuDunn's work as correspondents in China was beyond compare, and now they have written a book every bit as astonishing. China Wakes is filled with anecdote, detail, and analysis of the highest order...This book demands reading, and yet it is a pleasure as well as an education."—David Remnick

"Every page of China Wakes is trenchant, and I cannot think of a reportorial book on China so zealous in investigation and so painstaking in probing issues from every angle."—Ross Terrill, Foreign Affairs

"Thought-provoking and absorbing...Few books on China have done so much to further our understanding. Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn share with the readers their wealth of information, keen observation and intelligent interpretation."—Nien Cheng, author of Life and Death in Shanghai

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In one of the best books on contemporary China, Kristoff and WuDunn ponder a central paradox: an explosion of wealth and entrepreneurship in the world's third biggest economy (after the U.S. and Japan) flourishes under a repressive, authoritarian regime. This husband-and-wife team, Pulitzer Prize-winning Beijing correspondents for the New York Times from 1988 to 1993, take us from the Xinjiang region in China's far west, where an Islamic revival threatens Party rule, to occupied Tibet seething with hatred for the Chinese overlords. They report on widespread alienation from the government, massive rural poverty, rampant bribery and corruption, increasing discrimination against women in the workplace, routine abduction and trafficking in women and children. The authors also perceive ``the embryo of a civil society'' emerging that may one day undermine the dictatorship. WuDunn, who is Chinese-American, writes of her sometimes frustrating search for her native identity in a regimented society pervaded by a ``culture of silence.'' Photos. Author tour. (Sept.)
Library Journal
This thought-provoking analysis of daily life in China is the first book to rival Fox Butterfield's China: Alive in the Bitter Sea (LJ 4/15/82). All the authors are New York Times correspondents, but while Butterfield did five years of graduate work in Asian studies, Kristof graduated from law school and WuDunn has an MBA and a master's degree in public administration. As a result, they analyze China in terms of its progress in the areas of civil rights and business. The authors argue that today's leaders are remarkably similar to those of past dynasties but that, given their entrepreneurial energy, Chinese people are living better now than ever before. In interviews with many different types of people, Kristof and WuDunn (who won a Pulitzer Prize for their reporting on the Tiananmen Square massacre) observe that Chinese society is changing slowly in the face of much blatant injustice. On a positive note, they see China as a nation that is beginning to appreciate the benefits of law over imperial rule. Highly recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/94.]-Peggy Spitzer Christoff, Oak Park, Ill.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679763932
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/28/1995
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 724,747
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.95 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2002

    Good but be careful

    I must admit this book was quite amazing, and gave wonderful insight into the Chinese psyche and the problems in modern China. The analgie of the Communist Party to the Old Dynasties is quite insightful into Chinese culture. However while this is an excellent, its not the book for someone who knows little of China. Much of this book concentrates on the terrible hardships and injustices the people endure. While they are no to be ignored, they must be understood. One should have a basic knowledge of CHina and its culture before reading this, lest you be left with a bad impression of the country and its people. A good starting point would be 'Understandig CHina' published in 2001 an fairly comprehensive it is a quick and easy read, with lots of important bits on China's history and culture, where the people are today and where they are going--a good primer for anyone intrested in China with little knowledge of the people. Its also makes for a good read for any Sinophile out there.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2012

    If you really want to understand China, This stream of conscious

    If you really want to understand China, This stream of consciousness rambling by the author is not your best choice. I have read perhaps 100 books about life, people, history and culture in China and this one had absolutely nothing to add to one's knowledge. You are getting more opinion than in-depth analysis and the opinions offered seemed to be based on nothing except the fact that the author has been to China. To understand the modern history of China, a good start would be Wild Swans by Jung Chang, a captivating, never boring, and extremely well written book, exceeded perhaps only by her well documented and excellent biography of Mao Zedong. Additionally there are dozens of excellent books on the Cultural Revolution, both fiction and non-fiction. If you want to read a boring and non-informative book, then this is the one. Jonathan Spence has written several extremely informative books, all somewhat tedious, more like a college history textbook. Anyone who masters Spence's general history books on China will acquire a substantial knowledge of the country and its history/culture, but prepare to be bored. At least you can learn from Spence. I do not recommend his biography of Mao. which is overly summarized, unlike the extremely detailed nature of most of his books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2000

    An Enduring Analysis of China

    Kristoff and WuDunn have managed to collect a series of fascinating stories and vignettes from China which capture the essence of the nation. Though the book is now five years old, I have just reordered it for my China course at the University of South Florida. No use making students read something which is dull and less informative than this volume. Don't be put off too much by the pessimistic tone of the authors in the first half of the book. There is lots wrong with communist China. But the second half is more up-beat, and they end on an optimistic note.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2000

    This Book Is a Gem

    I emigrated from China when I was fourteen. In the twenty years or so of being in the US I've never found another book on the subject of modern China as insightful and heart-warming as 'China Wakes'. The strength of the book lies in the interviews, account after account, that the authors conducted not only in the 'tourist spots' but also in the remote regions. My years of growing up there confirm their stories, if not in substance, at least in spirit. Their conclusions, always carefully disclaimed as personal and not absolute (which add to, rather than detract from, the authors' authenticity), are both logical and even-handed. I found myself respecting the author's opinions, even when in a few instances when I disagreed with them. If there were anything which may make this book less well-accepted, I think it would be the lack of academic psycho-babbles which so proliferates in the literary and journalistic elite. But for the rest of us who haven't mastered the art of obfuscation, this book is a gem.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)