The Chinese Americans

The Chinese Americans

by Barry Moreno, Marissa Lingen
     
 

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Like other immigrant groups, the Chinese came to North America in search of a better life. They sought to escape poverty and a harsh government. During the 19th century, hardworking Chinese immigrants helped build America's railroads and mine gold and silver. However, they often suffered persecution at the hands of white Americans, many of whom feared that the Chinese… See more details below

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Overview

Like other immigrant groups, the Chinese came to North America in search of a better life. They sought to escape poverty and a harsh government. During the 19th century, hardworking Chinese immigrants helped build America's railroads and mine gold and silver. However, they often suffered persecution at the hands of white Americans, many of whom feared that the Chinese would take their jobs. In 1882, the U.S. Congress passed a law designed to restrict immigration from China. Further legislation virtually shut off Chinese immigration in the 1920s. Still, Chinese Americans found ways to prosper.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-These slender series entries emphasize Japanese and Chinese immigration to the U.S., particularly to Hawaii and California, but immigration to Mexico and Canada is briefly touched upon. The jobs and living conditions of the immigrants, and the prejudices they encountered, are covered. Contino includes material on the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. However, the book is riddled with errors. There is no such person as "Emperor Edo." Terms like "the Edo government" and "shogun" are introduced with no background information. Children's picture-book author Taro Yashima is listed only as Jun Atsushi (minus his last name, Iwamatsu) in "Famous Japanese Americans." The caption accompanying a picture of cherry trees mentions the ones given to Washington, DC, "during the 19th century"; actually, it was in 1912. Chinese Americans is more reliable, but both books suffer from poor writing, with repetition, the inclusion of irrelevant material, and some patronizing language. Color and black-and-white photographs as well as many lengthy text boxes appear throughout; the typefaces are difficult to read. The chapter introductions to Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler's Japanese American Family Album (1996) and Chinese American Family Album (1998, both Oxford) include much of the same information.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422206058
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Series:
Major American Immigration Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1010L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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