The Chinese Book of Animal Powers by Chungliang Al Huang, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Chinese Book of Animal Powers

The Chinese Book of Animal Powers

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by Chungliang Al Huang
     
 

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For thousands of years, the Chinese have believed that each of us is born with the characteristics and powers of a member of the animal kingdom, depending on the month and year of our birth. Now readers of all ages can discover for themselves the fun and wisdom of this age-old Chinese tradition in this exquisite book by celebrated author and artist Chungliang Al

Overview

For thousands of years, the Chinese have believed that each of us is born with the characteristics and powers of a member of the animal kingdom, depending on the month and year of our birth. Now readers of all ages can discover for themselves the fun and wisdom of this age-old Chinese tradition in this exquisite book by celebrated author and artist Chungliang Al Huang.
Find out which animal powers you were born with and which powers your friends and family possess. Discover how to absorb and adapt other animal powers into your own. Have fun pronouncing Chinese names with sounds that date back to ancient times. Feel each animal's graceful movements by tracing elegant brush calligraphy.
With a full-page spread devoted to each animal, a glossary of movement and art, and an easy-to-use year and month chart, The Chinese Book of Animal Powers is a unique introduction to the Chinese Zodiac by an expert teacher and philosopher.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Huang (Embrace Tiger, Return to Mountain, for adults) incorporates Chinese beliefs via an energetic and artistic tribute to the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. When Buddha called 12 creatures together under the Banyan Tree, the brief preface explains, he "taught them about their strengths and weaknesses, then sent all twelve animals into the world to guide people in their growth, linking each animal to a month and year." Youngest readers may require some additional enlightenment for a few of the terms that follow (e.g., chi, power of creative expression, and tao, one's path), but all readers will likely appreciate the fact that Huang offers an unadulterated story here. Thick black brush strokes that seem to dance on the page outline one exuberant creature per spread, labeled by its Chinese name (Tswoo, Neeoh, Whoo, etc.), accompanied by its calligraphic symbol. Concise descriptions explain the characteristics of the animal as well as its relevance to the sermon under the Banyan Tree. For instance, the first arrival, Tswoo, "sometimes call[ed] a mouse, a rat, or a guinea pig..." represents the innocence of "The Beginner's Mind" in Buddhism. Joo (a pig), who arrives just in time for the sermon, is "a lesson in what the Chinese call the TAO of Being instead of Doing." Readers of all ages will want to use the closing chart to piece together their own characteristics (based on their year and month of birth), then profile all their friends. All ages. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Gr 4 Up-Using a picture-book format, an accomplished calligrapher depicts each animal of the Chinese zodiac on a double-page spread and outlines the supposed personality traits of people born under that sign. The Chinese characters naming the animals are written in elegant black-and-white brush strokes, as well as the cursive letters of the English alphabet, using the author's own idiosyncratic, phonetic Romanization. Calligraphy, the foundation of Chinese painting, revered above all other Chinese arts for 2000 years, is the star here. In a "Dancing Glossary," the author connects calligraphy with whole-body movement and briefly explains related terms (chi, yin and yang, and tai ji). The text is as entertaining as a newspaper astrology column and just as slight. Ed Young's Cat and Rat: The Legend of the Chinese Zodiac (Holt, 1995) and Eric Kimmel's The Rooster's Antlers (Holiday, 1999) tell different stories explaining how the animals were chosen and placed in sequence. Since Huang does not tell a story that will hold children's interest, this book is most useful for showing examples of fine modern Chinese calligraphy.-Margaret A. Chang, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848190665
Publisher:
Kingsley, Jessica Publishers
Publication date:
05/15/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Chungliang Al Huang is the founder of Living Tao Foundation, an international cultural-arts network for lifelong learning, and the director of the Lan Ting Institute, a cross-cultural study and conference center at the sacred and historic Wu Yi Mountain, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the People's Republic of China, and at Gold Beach on the Oregon Coast in the USA. He has written many classic books including Embrace Tiger, Return to Mountain: The Essense of Tai Ji; Essential Tai Ji; and The Chinese Book of Animal Powers, all of which are now brought back into print by Singing Dragon.

Chungliang Al Huang is the founder of the Living Tao Foundation, an international cultural-arts network for lifelong learning, and he is also director of the Lan Ting Institute, a cross-cultural study and conference centre at the sacred and historic Wu Yi mountain in China, and at Gold Beach on the southern Oregon Coast in the USA. An extremely well-known Chinese Master, he grew up in China steeped in the studies of the classics. fine and martial arts. He came to the USA as a student in 1955 to become an architect and performing artist and began building bridges in East/West cultural synthesis, teaching at all the Human Potential Centers around the world, including Esalen Institute and Omega Institute in the USA; and Findhorn and Dartington Hall in the UK. He has written many classic books including Quantum Soup: Fortune Cookies in Crisis, Embrace Tiger, Return to Mountain, and Essential Tai Ji, all of which are now brought back into print by Singing Dragon. He has collaborated with Joseph Campbell, John Blofeld and Huston Smith, and is also co-author with Alan W. Watts of "Tao : The Watercourse Way" and with Dr. Jerry Lynch of "Thinking Body, Dancing Mind".

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