The Chinese Cultural Revolution

The Chinese Cultural Revolution

by Louise Chipley Slavicek
     
 

One of history's most horrific political upheavals, the Chinese Cultural Revolution began in 1966, when the Chinese Communist Party officially launched the radical movement on the orders of its autocratic chairman, Mao Zedong. Mao intended the movement to revitalize China's revolutionary fervor while simultaneously accelerating the country's evolution into a true

Overview

One of history's most horrific political upheavals, the Chinese Cultural Revolution began in 1966, when the Chinese Communist Party officially launched the radical movement on the orders of its autocratic chairman, Mao Zedong. Mao intended the movement to revitalize China's revolutionary fervor while simultaneously accelerating the country's evolution into a true Communist Utopia. China's young people became the advance guard for this new revolution, forming paramilitary Red Guard units. These adolescent shock troops humiliated, beat, and murdered teachers, intellectuals, local party officials, and others whom they judged to be insufficiently devoted to Mao and his radical ideals. By the time the Cultural Revolution finally ended in 1976, it had claimed the lives of some 3 to 4 million Chinese and left millions more physically or psychologically scarred.

Milestones In Modern World History introduces students to seminal historical events that helped shape the modern world. Bolstered by biographical sketches, illustrations, photographs, excerpts from primary source documents, and first-person narratives, this curriculum-based series is ideal for students writing reports.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—Spanning from 1966 until Mao's death a decade later, China's cultural revolution remains "one of history's most horrific political and social upheavals." Starting with a brief history of 20th-century China, the book discusses the political paranoia and machinations that set it into motion. Slavicek clearly explains this complex and confusing time for readers with little to no background in modern Chinese history, covering the social, economic, and political aspects of the era. The book is at its best when explaining Mao's political maneuvering. Numerous pull-out boxes provide context about and excerpts from primary sources. The final chapter offers a short overview of post-Mao China, explaining the country's economic growth and continued political oppression. In addition to the cited academic sources, the further-reading list gives many books and Web sites appropriate for students. With the number of memoirs coming out for middle grade and teen readers, such as Moying Li's Snow Falling in Spring (Farrar, 2008), Da Chen's China's Son: Growing Up in the Cultural Revolution (Delacorte, 2001), and Ji-li Jiang's Red Scarf Girl (HarperCollins, 1997), this welcome title provides much-needed context.—Jennifer Rothschild, Prince George's County Memorial Library System, Oxon Hill, MD

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604132786
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Milestones in Modern World History Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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