Overview

Chinese Culture and Mental Health presents an in-depth study of the culture and mental health of the Chinese people in varying settings, geographic areas, and times.
The book focuses on the study of the relationships between mental health and customs, beliefs, and philosophies in the Chinese cultural setting. The text reviews traditional and contemporary Chinese culture; characteristic relations and psychological problems common in the Chinese family; adjustment of the Chinese ...
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Chinese Culture and Mental Health

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Overview

Chinese Culture and Mental Health presents an in-depth study of the culture and mental health of the Chinese people in varying settings, geographic areas, and times.
The book focuses on the study of the relationships between mental health and customs, beliefs, and philosophies in the Chinese cultural setting. The text reviews traditional and contemporary Chinese culture; characteristic relations and psychological problems common in the Chinese family; adjustment of the Chinese in different socio-geographical circumstances; and general review of mental health problems.
Ethnologists, sinologists, psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists will find the book interesting.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781483276274
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 10/22/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 436
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Wen-Shing Tseng, M.D. is a professor of psychiatry at University of Hawaii School of Medicine. He has served as chairman of Transcultural Psychiatric Section of World Psychiatric Association for two terms from 1983 to 1993, and presently is honorable advisor for the Section. As a consultant to the World Health Organization, he has traveled extensively to many countries in Asia and the Pacific. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture (USA), and guest professor of the Institute of Mental Health, Beijing University, China. Relating to the subject of culture and mental health, he has coordinated numerous international conferences in Honolulu, Beijing, Tokyo, and Budapest. He has edited or authored more than a dozen books, including Culture and Psychopathology and Culture and Psychotherapy.
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Table of Contents

Contents

Contributors

Preface

Glossary

Part I Culture, Society, and Personality

1. Introduction: The Characteristics of Chinese Culture

Background

Different Courses of Sociocultural Change

Common Characteristics of Chinese Culture

Concluding Remarks

References

2. The Emergence of the New Chinese Culture

Introduction

The Concept of Culture

Social and Economic Transformations

Initial Ideological Campaigns

Impact of the Cultural Revolution

Response by the Chinese People

Cultural Transition

References

3. The Confucian Paradigm of Man: A Sociological View

Introduction

The Confucian Conception of Humanity

Family Structure and the Individual

The Problematic of the Confucian Paradigm

The Self and Relation-Construction

References

4. A Preliminary Study of the Character Traits of the Chinese

Introduction: Research on Personality

The MMPI

Preliminary Findings on the MMPI in China

Discussion and Cultural Explanation

References

5. Social Change, Religious Movements, and Personality Adjustment: An Anthropological View

Introduction

Theoretical Framework

Ritualized Society

Antiritualism Cults

Social Hygiene Cults

Millennial Cults

Nativistic Movements

Discussion

References

6. Traditional Chinese Beliefs and Attitudes toward Mental Illness

Introduction

Ancient Records of Mental Illness

Review of Traditional Medical Books

Emotional Disorders as Described in Literary Writing

Conclusion

References

Part II Family and Child

7. The Effect of Family on the Mental Health of the Chinese People

Background

The Role of the Family in Child Rearing

The Role of the Family in Married Life

The Role of the Family in the Care of the Elderly

Family Construction among Strangers

Discussion

References

8. The Chinese Family: Relations, Problems, and Therapy

Introduction

The Concept of Family Health and Pathology

Chinese Family Structure and Relationships

Common Psychological Problems

Usual Coping Patterns

Clinical Significance and Application

Summary

References

9. Child Training in Chinese Culture

Background

Research Methods

Theoretical Considerations

Chinese Child Rearing and the Development of the Mother-Child Bond

Situations That Arouse Fear and the Susceptibility to Fear

Aggression

Conclusion

References

10. Characteristics of Temperament in Chinese Infants and Young Children

Introduction

Report of Chinese Studies

Discussion

References

11. The One-Child-per-Family Policy: A Psychological Perspective

Introduction

A Need for Better Family Planning

Recent Developments in Family Planning

Advantages and Disadvantages of Only Children

Causes of Negative Behavior Patterns in Only Children

Special Aspects of Early Childhood Education

Conclusion

References

12. Child Mental Health and Elementary Schools in Shanghai

Introduction

The Elementary School System in China

An Example of the School Mental Health Situation in Shanghai

Psychiatric Disorders among Students

Closing Comment

References

Part III Adjustment in Different Settings

13. Language and Identity: The Case of Chinese in Singapore

Introduction

The Sociolingusitic Situation in Singapore

The Policy of Multilingualism

The Trend of Language Shift

The Chinese Dilemma

Language and Identity: Some Considerations

References

14. Social Stress and Coping Behavior in Hong Kong

Introduction

Prevalence of Psychiatric Stress

High-Density Living and Adjustment

Material Aspiration and Adjustment

Concluding Remarks: The Fading of Immigrant Culture

References

15. Chinese Adaptation in Hawaii: Some Examples

Introduction

Background: The Chinese in Hawaii

Successful Examples: The Subjects of the Interviews

Results of the Interviews

Discussion

References

Part IV Mental Health Problems

16. Mental Health in Singapore and Its Relation to Chinese Culture

The Singapore Chinese

Mental Health Services in Singapore

Conclusion

References

17. Psychiatric Pathology among Chinese Immigrants in Victoria, Australia

Demographic Sketch

Historical Background

Current Psychiatric Survey

Findings

Summary

References

18. Sociocultural Changes and Prevalence of Mental Disorders in Taiwan

General Social and Health Background

Prevalence of Mental Disorders

Discussion

References

19. An Overview of Psychopathology in Hong Kong with Special Reference to Somatic Presentation

Introduction

Manifestation of Mental Disorders

Psychological and Cultural Explanations

Treatment Resources

Methodological Issues

References

20. An Epidemiological Study of Child Mental Health Problems in Nanjing District

Introduction

Description of the Method

Results of the Investigation

Discussion

Comment

References

21. An Investigation of Minimal Brain Disorders among Primary School Students in the Beijing Area

Introduction

Investigations in Elementary Schools of Different Areas

Summary

References

22. Some Psychological Problems Manifested by Neurotic Patients: Shanghai Examples

Introduction

Common Psychological Problems

Comments

References

Part V Management and Prevention of Mental Illness

23. The Mental Health Delivery System in Shanghai

Introduction

A Three-Level Scheme of the Mental Health Care System

Summary and Future Perspectives

References

24. The Mental Health Home Care Program: Beijing's Rural Haidian District

Introduction

General Information about the Haidian District Project Area

Procedures Used in Setting up the Community Mental Health Care Network

Findings of the Psychiatric Survey in the Haidian District

Development of the Home Care Program

Results of the Home Care Program

Discussion

References

Part VI Summary and Suggestions for the Future

25. Mental Disorders and Psychiatry in Chinese Culture: Characteristic Features and Major Issues

Introduction

Characteristic Features of Mental Disorders among the Chinese

Treatment Modalities of Mental Disorders

Coping, Help-Seeking, and Delivery of Mental Health Services

for the Mentally 111 in Chinese Culture

Theories and Hypotheses about Mental Disorders

Concluding Remarks

References

26. Directions for Future Study

Introduction 3

Important Approaches to Studying Culture and Mental Health

Future Directions

Chinese Culture and Mental Health: Review

References

Index


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